Author Topic: The Dayton Banana  (Read 7099 times)

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Offline Jeffrey

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The Dayton Banana
« on: August 11, 2007, 10:56:38 AM »






















Pancake buildings are the norm in Dayton.  It is rare to see anything above two or three stories in the suburbs.



Mead had bought all this land for a corporate HQ campus but never moved here.  Mead subdivided it for office parks and condos/apartments starting in the 1970s, and located its computer subsidiary here, which became Lexis-Nexis.  In the end, what’s left of Mead in the Dayton area, New Page, did eventually relocate out here.



The Exchange is well under development  the start of retail creep south of the Mall toward Austin Road, whch will be the hot new area south of this, really an extentsion of  the office development you’ve seen here southward to the county line and beyond.

 

NCR data warehousing spin-off





The first drive-through Starbucks in Dayton



Banking moving north from Butler & Warren Counties







The interstate opened through here in 1959.  The first corporations to relocate from Dayton came in the mid 1960s …Huffy and Monarch Marking (now Paxar). The Mall was built in 1969-70. Development started in the 1970s, but really took off in the 1980s, when the DAYCO building (AKA Prestige Plaza) was built.  DAYCO makes auto parts.








The first retail applications for the bar code/UPC was developed here in the late 60s/early 70s. Another Dayton technology first.



Retail shifts in the mall area.  This area is sort of declining as there is more modern product elsewhere on the Banana.



Older shopping mall…this place was lightened up during a renovation to put in skylights. The mall was built at an angle so the view is broken up a bit and one doesn’t experience long corridors.



New addition from the early 1990s (to the new Penny’s) is double-decker






“Lifestyle Center” outbuildings trying to copy The Greene.




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The first big extension of the Mall Area was to the east, along OH 725 and I –675.  This stretch of 675 was built in 1984.  The area was touted in the local press as the “yuppie corridor” of sorts, during the 1980s and early to mid 90s, with development peaking around 1990-91.   Though it remains a business center it isn’t quite as “in” as it used to be.





Route 725 paralleling the bypass







As this was the center of the local singles scene for awhile there are a number of bars, including that weird (to me) Dayton touch of putting nightclubs to the rear of shopping centers (like in the last example).


















This was one of the first spec office/industrial thing to go in here in the  mid 1970s.  I like that tilt slab design. sort of high-tech.



Interiors firm designed to look like a big Ohio barn



The exterior finishes on this one are in wood, stone, and shingle, intended to meld better with nearby residences



The Ministry of Truth, broadcasting to the telascreens from that tower in the back





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The I-675/OH 48 (Far Hills) interchange was considered as a location for the Dayton Mall in the late 60s.  Commercial development was creeping down here along Far Hills, but really kicked off in the 1980s:  Cross Pointe shopping center was built in 1984.  Not sure about the office park, probably started in the 1970s, but really developed in the 1980s mostly.








 Bethany Village is mostly ranchettes, but has this one tower, which is one of the taller buildings outside of downtown.  Dayton has nearly no suburban towers.



Kettering Foundation.  This is another example of local institutions leaving downtown. They had an office building downtown on Monument Street, next to the prestigious Engineers Club, but turned that over to Wright State as a downtown campus and moved out here to this beautifully landscaped suburban site.



Cross Pointe- a giant strip center



Fairly large office park.  Fun architecture, particularly the last one






 

I-675 heads off into the east towards Wilmington Pike.  This was the last stretch opened.  Nov 1986.  The alignment was approved in 1966-67.  One of the most controversial interstates in Ohio.  The wooded areas are mostly residential, but on the right (south) side there are offices and such on and off. 



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This is developing into a hot new location on the banana. 

I love these aerials (from the Bear Creek Capital website). I love The tag cloud of logos floating over the scene.  What better illustration of the branded landscape.  One doesn’t see or experience the landscape, one sees and experiences the marketing, the virtual reality of capitalist space, where “Everything that was directly lived has receded into a representation”.


The area to the south was developed first, starting with Cub foods and that strip center (closest to the freeway) in 1987.  Most all else was developed in the 1990s.



The area to the north was developed in the late 90s & 00’s, mostly.



Miami Valley Hospital follows the population south.   The wooded area being cut through by I-675 is the “enchanted NIMBY forest”.  The people in the subdivision next to the interstate, to the left (Oak Creek), were responsible for kicking off the 11 year delay in the construction of I-675 as they wanted the freeway routed around those woods, not through them, but the irony was that their subdivision was sited in anticipation of the freeway, which is why the woods was left undeveloped.

Their pressure kicked off an EIS,  and then a bitter controversy between Dayton mayor /council and the suburban governments and the business community.  This was serious political hardball, with things like the editor of the Dayton Journal-Herald being forced to retract an editorial opposing the interstate, and then getting sacked, and the paper publishing the name and the street address of the head of the Kettering citizens group that originally opposed the freeway.





The issue was eventually became a Presidential campaign issue, elevated to the White House of both the Carter and Reagan administrations.  The controversy was a major reinforcement of city-suburban alienation in the Dayton area.

Fortunately Reagan became president, or I-675 wouldn’t have been built

Major new development will bring offices and modified lifestyle center to the interchange.





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Latest plans









Development is heading south on Wilmington Pike, with the Wilmington/Alex-Bell intersection having the last undeveloped land.  This is right on the county line.





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The Greene is the latest addition to the Banana.  The first lifestyle center in SW Ohio, this is proving to be a popular attraction, with Phase II under construction (closer the freeway). 


The novelty of the Greene is that the corrupt city government of Beavercreek used TIF to subsidize the development.  Was this necessary? This interchange was one of the two looked at for the Fairfield Commons Mall, so it was a prime development site.  IMO this site would have eventually been developed, TIF or no TIF.

In any case one can’t argue with the result.  This is a very nice shopping center.   


















This is a great example of suburban cannibalization.  This comedy club replaced one at the Dayton Mall area, which was just torn down.


Gold’s Gym.  I actually like this building.  Finally back to modernism!



Yet the urban mis-en-scene is pretty effective.





Lots of restaurants.  I think they may get a good lunch crowd from the nearby Research Park, which is our next bite of the Dayton Banana



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The Research Park was a Shaker colony, then the farm for the state insane asylum.  Planning commenced in the 1970s, and I think it went under development in the 1980s. 







The park was recently featured in the ULI publication “Urban Land” as an example of a “green” office park.



There are areas east of I-675 that are being developed, but the main action is west.



The park acts as a buffer for Beavercreek, separating that suburb from the declining inner-ring areas of Kettering and Belmont

Reynolds and Reynolds foreground) is a major new tenant, relocating their operations from downtown Dayton (the mostly empty skyscrapers of downtown are visible in the distance)









..another large firm (A/E/GIS/Aerial Photog/Planning/LA) that recently relocated from downtown.



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 Nearly nothing we’ve seen on the banana was “industrial”, as this is the locus of Dayton’s new economy. A key node in the emerging economic complex is the major role of Defense.  Dayton is a node in the nationwide Defense establishment, and this area is the heart of that activity.  This is Dayton’s Defense Edge City (though it also has the suburban campus of the local state university), and military R&D sets the tone on this part of the Dayton Banana.

With BRAC relocations this area is anticipated to intensify in development activity.





















This is just a taste of the office development between I-675 and the university.  I wish I had more pix of this area



Wright State University in the distance, which itself looks like an office park.  The military drove this particular suburban location, as they offered land. 







Fairfield Commons Mall

There is no public transit in the area except one line to the university.  This means the transit dependent population are effectively excluded from shopping in this mall (not that they could afford it).  The consensus is that this is a good thing as it keeps the riff raff out.  The mall itself is delightful, one of the nicest I’ve seen.  Very light and airy.  It was opened in the early ‘90s.  Security is tight.  I had to get Mall management permission to take these pix.











The Hindu Temple and some of the new development…offices are now developing around the mall (the Acropolis and Pentagon Park)







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The final bite out of the Dayton Banana is Valle Greene.  This is  development is just getting interest, with a small boom in construction.  Presumably after the area around the Fairfield Mall and WSU is developed this area might see more activity. 







Beyond this development drops off in intensity on the next two I-675 interchanges.  Mostly low density minimal industrial or log uses, scruffy stuff. 


Friends to Save the Arcade...stay informed via the website of the grassroots movement to save the Dayton Arcade.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2007, 01:24:55 PM »
Holy crap

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2007, 01:54:06 PM »
DAMN!     OUTSTANDING WORK!
...there's a reason that Elm Street and Main Street resonate in our cultural memory. It's not because we're sentimental saps. It's because this pattern of human ecology produced places that worked wonderfully well, and which people deeply loved. - Jim Kunstler

Offline Jeffrey

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2007, 04:40:37 PM »
Yeah, "Dayton Development News", all on one thread.  However, it looks like I am in trouble with photobucket.


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Offline ForeverGlow

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2007, 10:25:28 AM »
That's pretty sad to see. That shot of Research Park with Dayton in the background was awesome. I can't comprehend that Reynolds & Reynolds built that flipping humongous building out there. They could've built the tallest building in the center of downtown and actually have done a lot of good for the city. Dayton would really be chugging along if even half of those places could've been lured to the city or convinced to stay. You showed a picture of where my dad works—Kodak (formerly Scitex) in Research Park.

Offline Jeffrey

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2007, 09:09:34 PM »
^
sad to see?  A bi-nuclear linear city?  Well there is a touch of nihilist chic to it all, or I'm spinning it that way.  City of Quartz meets Rem Koolhass/MVRD, with a dusting of Debord, soundtrack by that electronic German group "Autobahn", while we bowl in a declining 50's Kettering.

Truth in advertising....I got this idea from the Blue Banana, from across the pond.




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Offline mark1152

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007, 02:02:45 PM »
The "Dayton Banana" could soon become the "Banana Tree" as Montgomery, Warren, and Butler Counties work together to develop the I-75 business corridor from Austin Pike to West Chester.

Offline edale

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2007, 02:14:20 PM »
Wow that Hindu Temple looks pretty cool!

Offline Jeffrey

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2007, 03:44:08 PM »
^
yeah its pretty visible over the strip centers on Fairfield Road.  A mosque is coming , too, but to different part of Beavercreek.  B-C is quite the 'international' suburb.

Quote
The "Dayton Banana" could soon become the "Banana Tree" as Montgomery, Warren, and Butler Counties work together to develop the I-75 business corridor from Austin Pike to West Chester.

Yeah, I read that, but I think I-75 is developing into a business corridor with or without the help from local govt.  I guess the countys want to coordinate things more?

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Offline Jeffery

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2011, 01:13:58 PM »
Wow..its been awhile!

Theres a cool new mid-rise hospital up across the street from Pentagon Park in the nothern end of the Banana, and that proposed hospital at Wilmington Pike & I-675 is complete and open. 

Teradata moved into their new building...and shortly therafter moved OUT to a NEW building at Austin Boulevard, further south....


Offline Rusty Shackleford

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2011, 09:21:26 PM »
...And the gutting of Dayton's core is irrevocably complete. Now we're seeing the gutting of the original southern Dayton mall development. A bunch of businesses visible in your graphics and photos above (Cena, Click Camera, others) no longer exist.

"The consensus is that this is a good thing as it keeps the riff raff out. " - acid social commentary, love it.

I thought this was a great essay when you published it. The banana metaphor works. Well done.

Offline Vince_908

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2011, 08:34:42 AM »
Overall, very depressing, though it's better than Dayton just altogether disappearing.

Offline Jeffery

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2011, 11:02:51 AM »
Quote
The consensus is that this is a good thing as it keeps the riff raff out. " - acid social commentary, love it.

I was being sarcastic and sort of reporting on hearsay when I posted that,  but then there was that controversy about RTA extending their WSU service as a loop down Pentagon Blvd and to Fairfield Commons, and I couldnt believe what I posted ended up being actually true

To be honest I wouldnt have believed it if I didnt see it myself ....that people actually DID have these anit-bus attitudes, where I was just being snarky in a worst-case sort of way. 

I'm still not over this.   It left a real bad taste in my mouth in re the Dayton area and the people who live here, whats under that "Midwest Nice" veneer. 

Quote
I thought this was a great essay when you published it. The banana metaphor works. Well done

Thank You!   Though I should say I cribbed this concept  from some French geographer or economist, who wrote about the "Blue Banana" over in Europe. 


Offline Eighth and State

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2011, 04:04:32 PM »

   One of the local township governments in Cincinnati approved a zone change for a new shopping center on the condition that buses be prohibited, with the intention clearly being to keep the riff-raff out. After some disabled residents complained of discrimination, the language was changed to prohibit buses with a capacity of more than 10 passengers or something like that, meaning to allow Metro Access buses which have wheelchair lifts but not still prohibiting regular Metro buses. So, this stuff really happens, and quite blatently.

     

Offline jeffinmichigan

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2011, 08:40:57 PM »
This is the first time I have viewed the "Dayton Banana" post.  Great work!

 It would appear, however, that if the Dayton area was intent upon making itself into a minature Detroit, it is well on its way.  All I can think of is a hollow core with a rich, vibrant "crust" on the fringes. 

Good luck with that, SW Ohio.  That sort of thing has worked out great in Detroit!
In my 40 years on this earth I have learned that if you can't discuss religion and politics without offending someone, only do it with people you KNOW agree with you or with people you don't like anyway!

Offline Jeffery

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Re: The Dayton Banana
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2011, 12:38:53 PM »
Quote
One of the local township governments in Cincinnati approved a zone change for a new shopping center on the condition that buses be prohibited, with the intention clearly being to keep the riff-raff out. After some disabled residents complained of discrimination, the language was changed to prohibit buses with a capacity of more than 10 passengers or something like that, meaning to allow Metro Access buses which have wheelchair lifts but not still prohibiting regular Metro buses. So, this stuff really happens, and quite blatently.

Wow.....man...so much for "urban Ohio".  Instead folks want to keep the 'city' at bay.

@@@

Quote
It would appear, however, that if the Dayton area was intent upon making itself into a minature Detroit, it is well on its way.  All I can think of is a hollow core with a rich, vibrant "crust" on the fringes. 

We are pretty close to that.  There are a lot of parallels.  The "crust" here..in this banana area.... is actually pretty vibrant and suburbia is rather nice.  In fact Dayton has some of the nicest suburbs around.   

The city itself is dying, aside from some historical district restoration areas. 
 
A big difference is that urban demolition hasnt really taken off here.

The city has taken out A LOT of housing areas since the start of Urban Renewal decades ago...actually even earlier via industrial down-zoning...but this was sort of a planned culling of housing stock via replacement with light industry, institutianal growth,  freeway construction, etc.

Now, however, one of every four "dwelling unit" (houses and apartments) are vacant in Dayton CIty,  but they havnt all been torn down yet.   

So the Detroit-style little-house-on-the-urban-prairie environment is just starting up here, and we are seeing more the gap-tooth effect...though in some areas there is more open space than houses on blocks.   

The big urban prairie areas here  are due to industrial demolitions, so you see a lot of open space where factories used to be.  Dayton has been pretty well de-industrialized, too. 

I should say all this office development has pretty much emptied out downtown. Maybe around 30% vacancy downtown, and entire buildings are shuttered.   


 
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 01:19:01 PM by Jeffery »

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