Author Topic: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion  (Read 308412 times)

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Online David

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2450 on: July 15, 2017, 12:48:40 AM »
It was?! I never saw any homes in Hilliard that looked that old. I suppose some parts are, though. There's neighborhoods in Upper Arlington that were built in the 50s that don't really look like it. I think Suburban Columbus might have been ahead of it's time in terms of bland, modern suburban architecture. Before exaggerated features that took over. I thought Hilliard didn't really take off until the 90s. I do recall seeing split-level houses that would be indicative of 70s'-ish development but the late 90s is when they built Tuttle and the farther-out parts of the west side of Columbus went to sh!t.

Before the mid-late 90s, it seemed that the Hilltop was much more in tact. It had many more middle class families and people who cared about the community and their kid's education. Now, it's worse than The Bottoms. With the recent development happening in The Bottoms, it's going to be MUCH worse than The Bottoms.

I remember as a kid living on the west side, people talking about Hilliard as if was some magical paradise. I honestly think the school district is what persuaded almost everyone to move there, though. Hilliard really isn't and never was that great. It's boring and sterile. It does have huge employment centers nearby, though. That's probably because the people who have a say in where companies are located, moved to Hilliard.

Personally, I'd rather live in the Westgate neighborhood, than Hilliard even though there isn't much commercially going on nearby. That area is truly a diamond in the rough. They have a really cool park (Westgate Park) with an awesome recreation center for kids and adults. You can grill out, there. Play tennis or basketball. They have a great playground for kids. It also has a big pond where you can catch giant catfish - some of which I've seen caught, are 4 feet long!

Murray Hill is also a tucked-away gem and very under-rated.

what neighborhood are you referring to when you say 'Murray Hill'?  I grew up on Murray Hill Road in Lincoln Village.

Murray Hill is just a street? I could have sworn it was a 'district.' I think the neighborhood is called Murray Hill but in any case, I was thinking of the neighborhood just north of that shopping center where the Westland Area Library is. New Rome/Westland area is generally quite a sh!t hole but I really liked that area north of those decayed shopping centers; you could tell residents take a lot of pride in it - at least around 2009-2011.
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Offline Toddguy

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2451 on: July 15, 2017, 12:39:51 PM »
It was?! I never saw any homes in Hilliard that looked that old. I suppose some parts are, though. There's neighborhoods in Upper Arlington that were built in the 50s that don't really look like it. I think Suburban Columbus might have been ahead of it's time in terms of bland, modern suburban architecture. Before exaggerated features that took over. I thought Hilliard didn't really take off until the 90s. I do recall seeing split-level houses that would be indicative of 70s'-ish development but the late 90s is when they built Tuttle and the farther-out parts of the west side of Columbus went to sh!t.

Before the mid-late 90s, it seemed that the Hilltop was much more in tact. It had many more middle class families and people who cared about the community and their kid's education. Now, it's worse than The Bottoms. With the recent development happening in The Bottoms, it's going to be MUCH worse than The Bottoms.

I remember as a kid living on the west side, people talking about Hilliard as if was some magical paradise. I honestly think the school district is what persuaded almost everyone to move there, though. Hilliard really isn't and never was that great. It's boring and sterile. It does have huge employment centers nearby, though. That's probably because the people who have a say in where companies are located, moved to Hilliard.

Personally, I'd rather live in the Westgate neighborhood, than Hilliard even though there isn't much commercially going on nearby. That area is truly a diamond in the rough. They have a really cool park (Westgate Park) with an awesome recreation center for kids and adults. You can grill out, there. Play tennis or basketball. They have a great playground for kids. It also has a big pond where you can catch giant catfish - some of which I've seen caught, are 4 feet long!

Murray Hill is also a tucked-away gem and very under-rated.

what neighborhood are you referring to when you say 'Murray Hill'?  I grew up on Murray Hill Road in Lincoln Village.

Murray Hill is just a street? I could have sworn it was a 'district.' I think the neighborhood is called Murray Hill but in any case, I was thinking of the neighborhood just north of that shopping center where the Westland Area Library is. New Rome/Westland area is generally quite a sh!t hole but I really liked that area north of those decayed shopping centers; you could tell residents take a lot of pride in it - at least around 2009-2011.

Murray Hill Road is a street. It runs north and south of Broad street and connects Lincoln Village South(south of Broad) with Lincoln Village North(north of Broad). The neighborhoods are Lincoln Village North and South. The area was built in the 50's and 60's by Murray Lincoln, connected to Nationwide Insurance, and it is about 3000 homes. At the northeast intersection of Murray Hill Road and Broad is a big sign saying 'LINCOLN VILLAGE'. Murray Hill road was named after Murray Lincoln, of course. East of Lincoln Village North is a different neighborhood called Garden Heights, and west of it is place called Little Farms. East of Lincoln Village South is a rundown Appalachian type of neighborhood called oddly enough, Mix Estates. West of it is Columbia Heights and Rome Heights.

The whole census designated place in Prairie township south of the railroad tracks, north of Sullivant avenue, west of the freeway(270) and east of Norton and Hilliard-Rome road is called Lincoln Village.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Village,_Ohio

(and the article is wrong in that 'Rome Heights' is not adjacent to the CDP, but is a part of the CDP of Lincoln Village.)

I have seen on google maps the name "Murray Hill' over Lincoln Village South and have heard of the area referred to as that a few times, but the area is really a part of Lincoln Village.

*Lincoln Village Plaza also is not that 'decayed' as it seems to be fully occupied and has a Giant Eagle among other things. One of my brothers lives on Deerfield in Lincoln Village North.

I also had noticed that the recession/depression hit the area hard and it seemed every third home on South Murray Hill was vacant. Now there is not a vacant house on the entire length of the street. It is a working class area now, a mix of white, black, hispanic. Unlike when I grew up and it was 100 percent white and among my young friends their fathers varied from factory workers to police officers and attorneys.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2017, 12:47:12 PM by Toddguy »

Offline KJP

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2452 on: July 15, 2017, 01:19:30 PM »
Murray Hill is both. It's the formal name of a street and an informal name of a neighborhood.
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Online David

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2453 on: July 16, 2017, 01:50:24 AM »
It was?! I never saw any homes in Hilliard that looked that old. I suppose some parts are, though. There's neighborhoods in Upper Arlington that were built in the 50s that don't really look like it. I think Suburban Columbus might have been ahead of it's time in terms of bland, modern suburban architecture. Before exaggerated features that took over. I thought Hilliard didn't really take off until the 90s. I do recall seeing split-level houses that would be indicative of 70s'-ish development but the late 90s is when they built Tuttle and the farther-out parts of the west side of Columbus went to sh!t.

Before the mid-late 90s, it seemed that the Hilltop was much more in tact. It had many more middle class families and people who cared about the community and their kid's education. Now, it's worse than The Bottoms. With the recent development happening in The Bottoms, it's going to be MUCH worse than The Bottoms.

I remember as a kid living on the west side, people talking about Hilliard as if was some magical paradise. I honestly think the school district is what persuaded almost everyone to move there, though. Hilliard really isn't and never was that great. It's boring and sterile. It does have huge employment centers nearby, though. That's probably because the people who have a say in where companies are located, moved to Hilliard.

Personally, I'd rather live in the Westgate neighborhood, than Hilliard even though there isn't much commercially going on nearby. That area is truly a diamond in the rough. They have a really cool park (Westgate Park) with an awesome recreation center for kids and adults. You can grill out, there. Play tennis or basketball. They have a great playground for kids. It also has a big pond where you can catch giant catfish - some of which I've seen caught, are 4 feet long!

Murray Hill is also a tucked-away gem and very under-rated.

what neighborhood are you referring to when you say 'Murray Hill'?  I grew up on Murray Hill Road in Lincoln Village.

Murray Hill is just a street? I could have sworn it was a 'district.' I think the neighborhood is called Murray Hill but in any case, I was thinking of the neighborhood just north of that shopping center where the Westland Area Library is. New Rome/Westland area is generally quite a sh!t hole but I really liked that area north of those decayed shopping centers; you could tell residents take a lot of pride in it - at least around 2009-2011.

Murray Hill Road is a street. It runs north and south of Broad street and connects Lincoln Village South(south of Broad) with Lincoln Village North(north of Broad). The neighborhoods are Lincoln Village North and South. The area was built in the 50's and 60's by Murray Lincoln, connected to Nationwide Insurance, and it is about 3000 homes. At the northeast intersection of Murray Hill Road and Broad is a big sign saying 'LINCOLN VILLAGE'. Murray Hill road was named after Murray Lincoln, of course. East of Lincoln Village North is a different neighborhood called Garden Heights, and west of it is place called Little Farms. East of Lincoln Village South is a rundown Appalachian type of neighborhood called oddly enough, Mix Estates. West of it is Columbia Heights and Rome Heights.

The whole census designated place in Prairie township south of the railroad tracks, north of Sullivant avenue, west of the freeway(270) and east of Norton and Hilliard-Rome road is called Lincoln Village.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Village,_Ohio

(and the article is wrong in that 'Rome Heights' is not adjacent to the CDP, but is a part of the CDP of Lincoln Village.)

I have seen on google maps the name "Murray Hill' over Lincoln Village South and have heard of the area referred to as that a few times, but the area is really a part of Lincoln Village.

*Lincoln Village Plaza also is not that 'decayed' as it seems to be fully occupied and has a Giant Eagle among other things. One of my brothers lives on Deerfield in Lincoln Village North.

I also had noticed that the recession/depression hit the area hard and it seemed every third home on South Murray Hill was vacant. Now there is not a vacant house on the entire length of the street. It is a working class area now, a mix of white, black, hispanic. Unlike when I grew up and it was 100 percent white and among my young friends their fathers varied from factory workers to police officers and attorneys.

I really don't understand why you're upset. I gave props to 'Murray Hill' by explaining what a great community and hidden gem it is. Whether it's a street or neighborhood, something inspired me to call the neighborhood 'Murray Hill.' I really believe that it was due to signage and marketing but even if that's not the case, does it really matter? Why the hell would you be offended by the kind words I've said, regarding the neighborhood which I've put in the spotlight against Hilliard or the City of Columbus? I said that the area is a hidden gem and that I'd rather live there, than Hilliard. Jesus Christ. What are you complaining about?
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 01:53:28 AM by David »
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Offline Toddguy

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2454 on: July 16, 2017, 11:46:18 AM »
Murray Hill is both. It's the formal name of a street and an informal name of a neighborhood.
It is the name of a street...I have never know it as even really an informal name of a neighborhood as I don't think much of anyone really refers to it as that-the first time I saw it called that was on Google maps and I wondered where did that come from?-I have relatives who live on Murray Hill Road and they have never heard of it. Are you from Columbus and did you grow up in the neighborhood or live there now? I have heard a few people refer to it but just a couple of times but never really thought much about it- is this something new that has developed in the last few years? I never heard of it ever referred to that way until a couple of years ago, and just a couple of times-which was why I was so surprised to see it on Google Maps.
It was?! I never saw any homes in Hilliard that looked that old. I suppose some parts are, though. There's neighborhoods in Upper Arlington that were built in the 50s that don't really look like it. I think Suburban Columbus might have been ahead of it's time in terms of bland, modern suburban architecture. Before exaggerated features that took over. I thought Hilliard didn't really take off until the 90s. I do recall seeing split-level houses that would be indicative of 70s'-ish development but the late 90s is when they built Tuttle and the farther-out parts of the west side of Columbus went to sh!t.

Before the mid-late 90s, it seemed that the Hilltop was much more in tact. It had many more middle class families and people who cared about the community and their kid's education. Now, it's worse than The Bottoms. With the recent development happening in The Bottoms, it's going to be MUCH worse than The Bottoms.

I remember as a kid living on the west side, people talking about Hilliard as if was some magical paradise. I honestly think the school district is what persuaded almost everyone to move there, though. Hilliard really isn't and never was that great. It's boring and sterile. It does have huge employment centers nearby, though. That's probably because the people who have a say in where companies are located, moved to Hilliard.

Personally, I'd rather live in the Westgate neighborhood, than Hilliard even though there isn't much commercially going on nearby. That area is truly a diamond in the rough. They have a really cool park (Westgate Park) with an awesome recreation center for kids and adults. You can grill out, there. Play tennis or basketball. They have a great playground for kids. It also has a big pond where you can catch giant catfish - some of which I've seen caught, are 4 feet long!

Murray Hill is also a tucked-away gem and very under-rated.

what neighborhood are you referring to when you say 'Murray Hill'?  I grew up on Murray Hill Road in Lincoln Village.

Murray Hill is just a street? I could have sworn it was a 'district.' I think the neighborhood is called Murray Hill but in any case, I was thinking of the neighborhood just north of that shopping center where the Westland Area Library is. New Rome/Westland area is generally quite a sh!t hole but I really liked that area north of those decayed shopping centers; you could tell residents take a lot of pride in it - at least around 2009-2011.

Murray Hill Road is a street. It runs north and south of Broad street and connects Lincoln Village South(south of Broad) with Lincoln Village North(north of Broad). The neighborhoods are Lincoln Village North and South. The area was built in the 50's and 60's by Murray Lincoln, connected to Nationwide Insurance, and it is about 3000 homes. At the northeast intersection of Murray Hill Road and Broad is a big sign saying 'LINCOLN VILLAGE'. Murray Hill road was named after Murray Lincoln, of course. East of Lincoln Village North is a different neighborhood called Garden Heights, and west of it is place called Little Farms. East of Lincoln Village South is a rundown Appalachian type of neighborhood called oddly enough, Mix Estates. West of it is Columbia Heights and Rome Heights.

The whole census designated place in Prairie township south of the railroad tracks, north of Sullivant avenue, west of the freeway(270) and east of Norton and Hilliard-Rome road is called Lincoln Village.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Village,_Ohio

(and the article is wrong in that 'Rome Heights' is not adjacent to the CDP, but is a part of the CDP of Lincoln Village.)

I have seen on google maps the name "Murray Hill' over Lincoln Village South and have heard of the area referred to as that a few times, but the area is really a part of Lincoln Village.

*Lincoln Village Plaza also is not that 'decayed' as it seems to be fully occupied and has a Giant Eagle among other things. One of my brothers lives on Deerfield in Lincoln Village North.

I also had noticed that the recession/depression hit the area hard and it seemed every third home on South Murray Hill was vacant. Now there is not a vacant house on the entire length of the street. It is a working class area now, a mix of white, black, hispanic. Unlike when I grew up and it was 100 percent white and among my young friends their fathers varied from factory workers to police officers and attorneys.

I really don't understand why you're upset. I gave props to 'Murray Hill' by explaining what a great community and hidden gem it is. Whether it's a street or neighborhood, something inspired me to call the neighborhood 'Murray Hill.' I really believe that it was due to signage and marketing but even if that's not the case, does it really matter? Why the hell would you be offended by the kind words I've said, regarding the neighborhood which I've put in the spotlight against Hilliard or the City of Columbus? I said that the area is a hidden gem and that I'd rather live there, than Hilliard. Jesus Christ. What are you complaining about?

Nobody is upset or complaining..why would you say that? What phrases or words did I use that conveyed that I was upset or complaining?  I was just explaining the neighborhood since I grew up in it. That is it.  What I don't understand is the apparent hostility to my comments here. What did I exactly write than suggested I was offended, upset, or complaining?  And no I am not upset, complaining, or offended now...just surprised really. Why  did pointing out some things and offering information about the neighborhood warrant such a harsh response?

Also it is not about 'props' or what anyone thinks of the place. It has steadily gone downhill(especially after the closing of Westinghouse and GM nearby) and I myself do not think of any of it as any kind of 'gem' of any sort. There are some decent sections but that is about it IMO.

Maybe I just don't need to be on this forum anymore...I just don't understand the way people respond here.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 11:53:17 AM by Toddguy »

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2455 on: July 16, 2017, 12:08:50 PM »
It's also interesting that Mexicans and other immigrants tend to almost always gravitate towards those Appalachian communities, yet somehow those white Appalachian folks are considered the most racist and intolerant group.

I guess these hipsters who somehow dictate all of the urban gentrification efforts, think they identify with the black community more-so than any other group, because they're a 'liberal.' This country is weird.

That's crazy, because the rivalries there have been known to the mainstream culture for decades.   Even in 70s TV, Archie Bunker had a petition that one minority family in the neighborhood was enough, George Jefferson got on his case about it.  Then he found out they were Puerto Rican, and signed it.

With Hispanics, it's not that they get a warm welcome from the Appalachians, it's that they don't get a hostile one like they get from some Blacks, who get similar from Appalachians.   

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2456 on: July 16, 2017, 12:49:04 PM »
It's also interesting that Mexicans and other immigrants tend to almost always gravitate towards those Appalachian communities, yet somehow those white Appalachian folks are considered the most racist and intolerant group.

I guess these hipsters who somehow dictate all of the urban gentrification efforts, think they identify with the black community more-so than any other group, because they're a 'liberal.' This country is weird.

That's crazy, because the rivalries there have been known to the mainstream culture for decades.   Even in 70s TV, Archie Bunker had a petition that one minority family in the neighborhood was enough, George Jefferson got on his case about it.  Then he found out they were Puerto Rican, and signed it.

With Hispanics, it's not that they get a warm welcome from the Appalachians, it's that they don't get a hostile one like they get from some Blacks, who get similar from Appalachians.   



If Archie Bunker were alive, he'd probably be living in Westchester or Mason. People like him ended up moving way out, I think.

I just think it's ridiculous how people get on here talking about hillbillies waiving confederate flags everywhere and acting ignorant and hostile. They're random anecdotes that don't coincide with real crime statistics or demographics that reveal diversity - at least in terms of historically Appalachian inner-city neighborhoods.
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Offline E Rocc

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2457 on: July 16, 2017, 01:00:42 PM »

If Archie Bunker were alive, he'd probably be living in Westchester or Mason. People like him ended up moving way out, I think.

I just think it's ridiculous how people get on here talking about hillbillies waiving confederate flags everywhere and acting ignorant and hostile. They're random anecdotes that don't coincide with real crime statistics or demographics that reveal diversity - at least in terms of historically Appalachian inner-city neighborhoods.

Or in terms of rural areas either.   They aren't strangers to destructive or violent behavior, but it's relatively quite rare and pretty much "man bites dog" as far as publicity goes.
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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2458 on: July 16, 2017, 01:07:30 PM »
Hillbillies are awesome. They're resourceful. They know how to fix EVERYTHING. They're really community-oriented and always look out for their neighbors. I loved having hillbilly neighbors! Any time I needed random tools, ladders, parts for my bike, etc., they always had them! Anytime I needed help fixing something, they were always there for me! Incredible that they took so much time away from waving their confederate flags to do all that.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 01:12:30 PM by David »
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Offline jjakucyk

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2459 on: July 16, 2017, 01:14:02 PM »
I think Mason or West Chester would be a bit out of Archie Bunker's price range.  I picture him in a place like Deer Park or Bridgetown.  The first ring suburbs and enclaves (and by first ring I mean immediately outside the city limits, though by date and style they'd probably be considered more like second ring) such as Deer Park and Bridgetown, as well as St. Bernard, Anderson, and Delhi, seem to be excessively curmudgeonly and anti-city compared to some of the farther out suburbs and exurbs. 

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2460 on: July 16, 2017, 01:51:07 PM »
Hillbillies are awesome. They're resourceful. They know how to fix EVERYTHING. They're really community-oriented and always look out for their neighbors. I loved having hillbilly neighbors! Any time I needed random tools, ladders, parts for my bike, etc., they always had them! Anytime I needed help fixing something, they were always there for me! Incredible that they took so much time away from waving their confederate flags to do all that.

Mexicans are similar, which could be a big part of why they seem to get along with Appalachians.   
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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2461 on: July 16, 2017, 02:00:02 PM »
There's parts of Mason that are cheap. Drive up 42 and see all the houses with crummy additions.

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2462 on: July 16, 2017, 05:58:04 PM »
Hillbillies are awesome. They're resourceful. They know how to fix EVERYTHING. They're really community-oriented and always look out for their neighbors. I loved having hillbilly neighbors! Any time I needed random tools, ladders, parts for my bike, etc., they always had them! Anytime I needed help fixing something, they were always there for me! Incredible that they took so much time away from waving their confederate flags to do all that.

Mexicans are similar, which could be a big part of why they seem to get along with Appalachians.   


That's not of much value to hipsters since they don't own anything. Therefore nothing can break.

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2463 on: July 17, 2017, 01:41:58 AM »
It's funny; not a single person on this site  has countered my argument with real statistics and there are a lot of nerds on this site with a lot of resources who I know would love to prove me otherwise. Fact is, most of the west side of Columbus, Old Brooklyn on down  to Clark-Fulton in Cleveland and Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati have relatively low crime rates and a history of inclusion compared to the rest of their respective cities. Inner-city Appalachian neighborhoods are indeed misunderstood and I dare say disenfranchised. I have Appalachian people in my family so it sort of hits home for me and I'd hope that people can understand  it's somewhat offensive when someone says something like, "I'd never live in Lower Price Hill because I don't want to live next to Kid Rock" or insinuating that they all wave confederate flags and act hostile towards everyone else  for no apparent reason. That's not true. I can see how it might be hard to differentiate the two but Hillbillies aren't the same as Rednecks!

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2464 on: July 17, 2017, 06:54:43 AM »
It's funny; not a single person on this site  has countered my argument with real statistics and there are a lot of nerds on this site with a lot of resources who I know would love to prove me otherwise. Fact is, most of the west side of Columbus, Old Brooklyn on down  to Clark-Fulton in Cleveland and Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati have relatively low crime rates and a history of inclusion compared to the rest of their respective cities. Inner-city Appalachian neighborhoods are indeed misunderstood and I dare say disenfranchised. I have Appalachian people in my family so it sort of hits home for me and I'd hope that people can understand  it's somewhat offensive when someone says something like, "I'd never live in Lower Price Hill because I don't want to live next to Kid Rock" or insinuating that they all wave confederate flags and act hostile towards everyone else  for no apparent reason. That's not true. I can see how it might be hard to differentiate the two but Hillbillies aren't the same as Rednecks!


Inclusion might be a bit of an overstatement (Appalachians are usually only truly inclusive with their own kin and allied families)  but only a bit of one as they aren't exclusive the way some groups can be.   They tend to be "equal opportunity" as far as suspicion goes.

One thing's for sure though, the disdain for them (and other rural/southern whites) is a big part of what got Trump elected.   It started with Gore in 2000 and a lot of people, myself included, thought that was mostly about guns.   That was part of it, but mostly it was about condescension.   Hillary was even worse than Obama and Gore at talking "at them" at best, but more likely down to them.   

No excuse for Hillary, because Bill didn't do that.  Trump, like him, got them to think he was talking to them, and with them.   He was probably faking and almost certainly generally full of fertilizer and deep down they knew it, but that turned them off far less than the "Progressive" approach does.
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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2465 on: July 17, 2017, 10:25:07 AM »
Young Appalachian males in Columbus are explosive. They're always jittering around and about to blow at any time. Always jabberjawing on the phone too. Between that and the willingness of an Appalachian to dump all their problems on you from the minute you meet them, you can see why they make other groups nervous.

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2466 on: July 17, 2017, 12:16:25 PM »
Growing up on the west side, our little baseball league teams were usually 50/50 Catholic/Appalachian.  The Appalachian kids on our teams always had dads who were gainfully employed (often wore those work uniforms to the games with name tags that said "Gary" or whatever).  But once or twice per year we'd play some hillbilly team up in Butler County near Hamilton.  Their dads didn't have jobs and things usually got out-of-control.  Their dads yelled at the umps, at each other, and occasionally coolers, folding chairs, and other items were thrown.  We were on vacation one year and so missed the time when a hillbilly dad got his gun out of his truck and threatened an umpire. 

In our area a fair number of the dads had union jobs at GE Aviation.  The place paid really well.  My dad had an advanced college degree but those guys were making as much or more than my dad did until he was at least 30.  Sometimes the moms had a little job on the side, but the men were definitely the breadwinners.  It established an order that allowed people to deal with problems one at a time.  Today, the lack of good employment for men is the cause of so much of the insane behavior we see all the time.   People are overwhelmed with problems because their financial situation is so precarious.   

Offline andrew0816

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2467 on: July 17, 2017, 12:21:32 PM »
It's funny; not a single person on this site  has countered my argument with real statistics and there are a lot of nerds on this site with a lot of resources who I know would love to prove me otherwise. Fact is, most of the west side of Columbus, Old Brooklyn on down  to Clark-Fulton in Cleveland and Lower Price Hill in Cincinnati have relatively low crime rates and a history of inclusion compared to the rest of their respective cities. Inner-city Appalachian neighborhoods are indeed misunderstood and I dare say disenfranchised. I have Appalachian people in my family so it sort of hits home for me and I'd hope that people can understand  it's somewhat offensive when someone says something like, "I'd never live in Lower Price Hill because I don't want to live next to Kid Rock" or insinuating that they all wave confederate flags and act hostile towards everyone else  for no apparent reason. That's not true. I can see how it might be hard to differentiate the two but Hillbillies aren't the same as Rednecks!

If you honestly think that your experience as a straight, white male who's family is from Appalachia is the same as other people's experiences (i.e. people who don't fit your description), then I don't know if it is worth even discussing this with you. But as far as Mexicans getting along with Appalachian folk, lol, yeah....maybe for my fellow Mexicans who are white, but that inclusion pretty much ends if you're unwilling to sell out your heritage (how many self-respecting Mexican Americans would put up with the blatant racism and anti-Mexican sentiment that white people/Appalachians/Trump supporters project?) or if you are not white presenting. Also, I used to work for a CDC that serves a neighborhood that has a mix of Latinos, African Americans, and white people of Appalachian decent and oh boy, do they not like outsiders, especially people who are not white. The amount of times I had to hear about how no one helps them out or how the area is being taken over by "those" people...

Oh, and I would not say that Old Brooklyn is primarily an "inner-city" Appalachian community, but my experiences with residents from those areas are anecdotal, but if you are truly interested in this and want statistics for these neighborhoods of which you speak, perhaps you could do your own work instead of relying on the "nerds on this site" to do it for you.

Online GCrites80s

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2468 on: July 17, 2017, 12:23:13 PM »
Growing up on the west side, our little baseball league teams were usually 50/50 Catholic/Appalachian.  The Appalachian kids on our teams always had dads who were gainfully employed (often wore those work uniforms to the games with name tags that said "Gary" or whatever).  But once or twice per year we'd play some hillbilly team up in Butler County near Hamilton.  Their dads didn't have jobs and things usually got out-of-control.  Their dads yelled at the umps, at each other, and occasionally coolers, folding chairs, and other items were thrown.  We were on vacation one year and so missed the time when a hillbilly dad got his gun out of his truck and threatened an umpire. 

In our area a fair number of the dads had union jobs at GE Aviation.  The place paid really well.  My dad had an advanced college degree but those guys were making as much or more than my dad did until he was at least 30.  Sometimes the moms had a little job on the side, but the men were definitely the breadwinners.  It established an order that allowed people to deal with problems one at a time.  Today, the lack of good employment for men is the cause of so much of the insane behavior we see all the time.   People are overwhelmed with problems because their financial situation is so precarious.   


If you've got your name embroidered on your shirt that indicates that your company at least cares about you a little and feels that you are important. All that warehouse stuff that dominates the sub I-70 Columbus economy doesn't do anything like that.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 12:23:57 PM by GCrites80s »

Offline Ram23

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2469 on: July 17, 2017, 12:37:39 PM »
^ I worked my way through college at a job wearing those uniforms with my name embroidered on the front. I took a shirt as a keepsake when I left and the company docked like $12 of pay from my last paycheck for it.

Online David

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Re: Suburban Sprawl News & Discussion
« Reply #2470 on: July 17, 2017, 12:42:32 PM »
They had just hired another guy named Ram and planned to re-use it.
Modern architects recognize 300 masterpieces but ignore the other 30 million buildings that have ruined the world. - Andres Duany

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