Author Topic: Cleveland: Marketing the City  (Read 176149 times)

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Offline Enginerd

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1190 on: July 23, 2016, 03:42:06 PM »
News organizations and downtown employers were consistently telling people to stay away. Not once did the city try and refute that. Consequently the only people who were downtown were the 50,000 visitors. A lot, but less than a normal, non-event day.

Offline Mov2Ohio

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1191 on: July 23, 2016, 05:00:09 PM »
^So what you meant was the absence of large crowds were because of downtown employers and news organizations saying to stay away?

There were plenty of news articles throughout the lead up to the RNC saying the city was ready.
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Offline gottaplan

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1192 on: July 23, 2016, 05:15:06 PM »
News organizations and downtown employers were consistently telling people to stay away. Not once did the city try and refute that. Consequently the only people who were downtown were the 50,000 visitors. A lot, but less than a normal, non-event day.

My office building downtown was dead. E&Y tower.  Parking lot was empty.  All the big employers told employees to work remotely or use Akron office etc

Offline clvlndr

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1193 on: July 23, 2016, 05:15:13 PM »
A lot of places did lose money, but that's the city's fault. They broadcasted fear for everyone to stay away and they did. What ended up happening was downtown was a ghost town everywhere except E4th street.

I don't disagree... can you believe it, even the strip joints were hurting!!  ... and Republicans love the, er, gentlemen's clubs.

Offline David

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1194 on: July 23, 2016, 08:22:36 PM »
A lot of places did lose money, but that's the city's fault. They broadcasted fear for everyone to stay away and they did. What ended up happening was downtown was a ghost town everywhere except E4th street.

I don't disagree... can you believe it, even the strip joints were hurting!!  ... and Republicans love the, er, gentlemen's clubs.

Right!? I only made $201 this week.

So am I right that the RNC probably wasn't worth having here? Would there happen to be any estimates on how much money it generated for the city AFTER expenses? That would be interesting to know. In all fairness, those who avoided the downtown area probably still went out in other parts of the city, so it's safe to say that the city probably did make money from this. It seems to me that hotel tax would be the biggest direct source of income but I'm not sure how that works. Maybe the state or county benefited more than Cleveland. That would be crazy if that were the case yet the county and state weren't required to invest in the RNC. I'm not going to pretend that I'm an expert and know off hand all of the extra expenses (and God knows hidden costs) but I was just thinking that when you have to pay so many officers time and a half, including those officers they recruited from other cities, that alone could seriously rack up a tab. It's also a very inconvenient time to pool your police force into one small area. The week before the RNC was the most violent/crime-ridden week this year in Cleveland (and probably most other cities since its cyclical.)
« Last Edit: July 23, 2016, 08:40:22 PM by David »
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Offline dave68

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1195 on: July 23, 2016, 09:10:39 PM »
I can tell you firsthand that every out of towner I met during the RNC was thoroughly impressed with Cleveland!  All said they look forward to coming back to explore our region more.  That is incredible for Cleveland and well worth hosting this convention.  I was part of the design team that designed the set for the convention and all the delegates said that Cleveland was the best convention city they have been a part of.   The food, the venues, Downtown walkability, the hotels, the museums, the lakefront , and mostly the people was impressive.  I couldn't agree more with the assessment.  I was born and raised in Cleveland and moved to Los Angeles 25 years ago.  I have been singing Cleveland's greatness for years and was honored to show the world what we all have known. This event will pay off for years to come.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2016, 09:11:37 PM by dave68 »

Offline Mov2Ohio

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1196 on: July 24, 2016, 08:34:12 AM »
I can tell you firsthand that every out of towner I met during the RNC was thoroughly impressed with Cleveland!  All said they look forward to coming back to explore our region more.  That is incredible for Cleveland and well worth hosting this convention.  I was part of the design team that designed the set for the convention and all the delegates said that Cleveland was the best convention city they have been a part of.   The food, the venues, Downtown walkability, the hotels, the museums, the lakefront , and mostly the people was impressive.  I couldn't agree more with the assessment.  I was born and raised in Cleveland and moved to Los Angeles 25 years ago.  I have been singing Cleveland's greatness for years and was honored to show the world what we all have known. This event will pay off for years to come.

Exactly. What you mentioned are the returns we'll be getting. People saw we are not the mistake by the lake, that we have a lot to offeread, so that next time Cleveland comes up on a short list to host a big event there won't be as much skepticism.

Most of the time when people come here they are impressed and this event exposed our city to thousands more tourists, media and event planners. Cleveland left a food impression on them and that will be on their minds when they think of us again.
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Offline Enginerd

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1197 on: July 24, 2016, 09:08:18 AM »
I can tell you firsthand that every out of towner I met during the RNC was thoroughly impressed with Cleveland!  All said they look forward to coming back to explore our region more.  That is incredible for Cleveland and well worth hosting this convention.  I was part of the design team that designed the set for the convention and all the delegates said that Cleveland was the best convention city they have been a part of.   The food, the venues, Downtown walkability, the hotels, the museums, the lakefront , and mostly the people was impressive.  I couldn't agree more with the assessment.  I was born and raised in Cleveland and moved to Los Angeles 25 years ago.  I have been singing Cleveland's greatness for years and was honored to show the world what we all have known. This event will pay off for years to come.

Exactly. What you mentioned are the returns we'll be getting. People saw we are not the mistake by the lake, that we have a lot to offeread, so that next time Cleveland comes up on a short list to host a big event there won't be as much skepticism.

Most of the time when people come here they are impressed and this event exposed our city to thousands more tourists, media and event planners. Cleveland left a food impression on them and that will be on their minds when they think of us again.

Oh I totally agree with you. Dave Gilbert has even said hosting this event was never about the direct spending, it's about exposure (which Cleveland scored a gold for). I guess my point was only that locals stayed far away for reasons that never materialized. And that was unnecessary. The event was definitely still a success.

Offline NCJ

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1198 on: July 31, 2016, 09:38:32 PM »
http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/destinations/2016/07/30/cleveland-tourism-attractions-dining/87662838/ This article was on the USA Today homepage. It's a really well-written article, and the writer seems to really have done their homework. Even the captions to each of the pictures have full paragraphs completely explaining the picture. These are the type of articles our city needs more of.

Online Pugu

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1199 on: August 01, 2016, 07:51:17 AM »
Overall good, but they misnamed/mislabled the city's most famous building, calling it the "Tower City Center Building"

Online TPH2

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1200 on: August 01, 2016, 08:35:31 AM »
Also this:

"Private companies have invested heavily in the downtown, including Hiltonís gleaming new 32-story downtown hotel overlooking the FirstEnergy Stadium where the Cleveland Browns play."

The quality of life in cities has much to do with systems of transport...Many cars, used by one or more people, circulate in cities, causing traffic congestion, raising the level of pollution, and consuming enormous quantities of non-renewable energy. -Pope Francis

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1201 on: August 01, 2016, 05:07:05 PM »
Also this:

"Private companies have invested heavily in the downtown, including Hiltonís gleaming new 32-story downtown hotel overlooking the FirstEnergy Stadium where the Cleveland Browns play."


Pretty lazy...
"Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for."-- Barack Obama

Offline X

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Re: Cleveland: Marketing the City
« Reply #1202 on: August 13, 2017, 01:33:40 PM »
Originally Published: August 11, 2017 12:25 PM   Modified: August 11, 2017 1:07 PM
EDITOR'S CHOICE -- SCOTT SUTTELL
Cleveland experiments with the power of positive thinking
By Scott Suttell

"Cleveland, like many Rust Belt cities, has both an image and a self-image problem."
That's how Aaron Renn, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research who blogs at Urbanophile.com, starts a strong post about the city and its residents, headlined, "Changing the narrative in Cleveland," which ultimately has an upbeat take on the city's prospects.
From the post:
Cleveland, like many Rust Belt cities, has both an image and a self-image problem. Its residents have simultaneously had passion and loyalty for the city, while also being filled with shame about it and relentlessly negative and fatalistic about its future. Again, this is something that is the case for any number of places.
This is a problem because the economy runs on expectations. Why do you start a business doing X? Because you expect to make a profit at it. Why move to city Y? Because you expect the job you have there will be a good fit or you otherwise expect that you are going to find personal satisfaction there. ...

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20170811/BLOGS03/170819955/cleveland-experiments-with-the-power-of-positive-thinking#utm_medium=email&utm_source=ccl-morningroundup&utm_campaign=ccl-morningroundup-20170812&email_realestate

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