Author Topic: Cleveland: Detroit-Shoreway / Gordon Square Arts District: Development and News  (Read 597122 times)

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Offline peabody99

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #70 on: March 31, 2006, 10:10:32 PM »
Breaking news from the Arts District! :clap:

A lease has been signed for the Kennedy Building, on the SE corner of Detroit & W. 65th. The tenant will be a bakery/coffehouse/lunch place called Gypsy Beans & Baking Co., owned by the former manager of Talkies Coffee House in Ohio City.
The owner recently purchased Ohio City Muffins and will be moving operations of the bakery to the space.
Significant build-out will begin soon, with an anticipated opening date of July 1.

This is fantastic news for the neighborhood, and a harbinger of more good things to come!
did you see Nicki at the market today too? She just told us about this. I think she will do a great job.I hope we can all support her!

Offline blinker12

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #71 on: April 01, 2006, 09:18:13 AM »
^No, I work at Detroit-Shoreway's CDC.
KJP, her name is Nicole (something). I forget the last name. Peabody?

Offline peabody99

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #72 on: April 01, 2006, 09:42:27 AM »
No I know Nicki (aka Nicole) from when she worked at talkies. She will do a nice job I think, very hard working person. I love that little stretch of street on Detroit. I was once there...I think at the Vietnamese market (cannot remember) and parked in front of a drug store that had photo essay of people's stories with mental illness ...it was terrific. sometimes people in this community get overwhelmed or frustrated with people with disabilities-as there are many, and this did a nice job of putting their stories to life. One of the best things about the area, is that despite gentrification, there is a rich history of social services that seems to be maintaining it self. I hope this does not change. I am joining the near west side developmental corp, as a resident (I hope other forumers in hood do as well!)...but have huge interest in maintaining social services in the area, as I work in that field with folks with in Detroit Shoreway, Ohio City, Tremont neighborhoods. I will give kudos to the folks who own lease apartments in building on Gordon square-very supportive and welcoming of our clients with developmental disabilities. Blinker-what a cool job you must have!

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #73 on: April 01, 2006, 09:06:37 PM »
Thanks!
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Offline blinker12

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So what is the latest from the Gordon Square Arts District, you may ask?

1. We have another firm lease signed, by M% Gallery, currently located on Larchmere. The gallery will move to the P.J. Shier building (former adult bookstore) on Detroit circa fall. The owner lives in the neighborhood and wanted a shorter commute.

2. A major restaurateur is in talks to purchase the old Perry Family Restaurant building and turn it into -- what else? -- a family-oriented restaurant.

3. The new bar by the owner of the Treehouse, Pete Lenaghan, will be called Ballycroy. It is on W. 65th north of Detroit and is slated to open this fall. Lenaghan has spent $2 million on renovation.

4. Gypsy Beans & Baking started build-out on their new space in the Kennedy Building at W. 65th and Detroit, but work seems to have come to a screeching halt. We're hoping they're open by fall.

5. Scaffolding is down from the old Lou's Furniture building (now called Near West Lofts), which should be online by September. I toured the apartments last month and they will have gorgeous views and wood floors. The other buildings in the Gordon Square Homes project are also on track to be open this fall.

Other things are simmering retail-development-wise but these are the most prominent.

As for the Arts District capital campaign, the three member organizations (Detroit-Shoreway, Near West Theatre and Cleveland Public Theatre) are on the verge of signing a memorandum of understanding outlining their shared goals and responsibilities. We are almost done with an economic impact analysis and parking study and have started a green building analysis. We are in the process of forming our capital campaign committee to lead our $20 million capital effort. I know, nothing too sexy yet, but it's all important groundwork.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2006, 08:50:38 AM by blinker12 »

Online StrapHanger

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Wow, B12, sounds like you got plenty of cool stuff keeping you busy over there,  thanks for the update!
"Cleveland, as you see, is not an apple, but a bunch of grapes each of which has its own particular pattern-some large, others small, some round, others long and narrow, some sweet, others sour, some sound, others rotten throughout."  -Howard Whipple Green, 1932

Offline 3231

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Did someone buy that cool little church next to Cleveland Public Theater?  Any plans for it?

Offline Map Boy

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hot!  well done B12...keep up the good work...and keep us informed!

any input on the name Ballycroy? 

Offline blinker12

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That church is owned by James Levin, and finds its way in and out of the Arts District plan almost daily. His long-term goal is to have it become an acoustic music hall, or to have Cleveland Public Theatre acquire it. No one has bought it from him yet, and I don't think he even has it listed on PURE anymore, but I'm sure he'd be more than willing to talk to any interested buyers.

Meanwhile, the Parish Hall next to the church is now permanent home to the Miller-Weitzel Gallery, previously located at 5304 Detroit.

Oh, the Ballycroy will have an indoor bocce ball (sp?) court.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2006, 10:19:19 AM by blinker12 »

Offline Map Boy

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how about table top shuffleboard?

Offline Punch

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Ballycroy is a city in County Mayo Ireland, where the Leneghans are from.
Originally Punch, then CleveChiNola, now back to Punch.

Offline Map Boy

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^gotchya.  thanks!

Offline blinker12

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Some photos from today.


The old Lou's furniture, with scaffolding removed and new windows, Detroit and W. 67th.


The back of Lou's from W. 67th, with Near West Theatre's site in the foreground.


The P.J. Shier building. Future home of M% Gallery. Detroit between 65th and 67th.


The Kennedy building, on the far corner, will be the new home to Gypsy Beans & Baking. Detroit and W. 65th.


The unique Muriel Building, part of the Gordon Square Homes project, Detroit and W. 70th.

Offline Map Boy

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so, who's going to come up with the money for them to bury those power lines?  I know that a sidewalk widening may be in the works for this busy intersection and it would be a shame to miss out on an opportunity like that.  Though, I hear it's quite expensive to do...

Thanks for the shots, B12!  Exciting stuff!

Offline blinker12

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MGD, power line burial is supposedly part of the streetscape plan. Though streetscape is budgeted at about $4 million, which seems low to include new sidewalks, lighting, street narrowing AND burial. Who knows.

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The planning Commission approved a plan last Friday that will bury the power lines in the Kamm's Corner area.
It was on the summary calendar, so there was no discussion.

I wonder if there has ever been a study comparing the cost of underground and overhead utilities.
I would think that the periodic cost of replacing poles hit by vehicles, storm damage, and normal wear and tear would be higher over time then the upfront cost of burying.

Online StrapHanger

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^Good question regarding relative costs.  The one down side of burying is the jack-hammering (which apparently must be at 7:30am right outside my apartment) required to repair/replace cables.  I'm still for it though.  Looks sooooo much better.
"Cleveland, as you see, is not an apple, but a bunch of grapes each of which has its own particular pattern-some large, others small, some round, others long and narrow, some sweet, others sour, some sound, others rotten throughout."  -Howard Whipple Green, 1932

Offline w28th

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I like having overhead wires crisscrossing the city streets.  Visually it gives the street a bit of a ceiling and adds to the clutter of urban streetscapes.  I say leave them.
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Offline MyTwoSense

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I hate overhead utilities.  It looks so 70s and gives the impression the city is uncosmopolitan.  I say bury them throughout the city and FAST!
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Offline w28th

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I don't think the area around W65th and Detroit is going for the pristine, cosmopolitian look that certain parts of downtown should maybe be going for.  Stripping away layers of urbanity doesn't make a more enjoyable setting, just take a look at what has happened to Coventry.  It's a shell of it's former self urbanistically.
"When you stand at the corner of Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street in Cleveland, you stand at one of the busiest corners in the world -- and in the heart of a shopping district known far and wide for its many fine shops."

Offline w28th

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^The same can be said of East 4th Street.
"When you stand at the corner of Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street in Cleveland, you stand at one of the busiest corners in the world -- and in the heart of a shopping district known far and wide for its many fine shops."

Offline JDD941

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MTS...WHERE is your sense of urbanism!?!?!  We should keep all the wires, and while we are at it...give residents free pairs of shoes to toss over the wires as well!  Keep the wires so Cleveland can look like the neighborhoods in NYC...wait...I mean Chicago...uh, wait....I mean DETROIT!  :)

As a firefighter, I hate those poles, wires, and above ground utilities...they get in the way of fire ground operations.    Beyond that though, they just look plain ugly and pose potentia hazards.

Offline X

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I've never thought of utility poles as "layers of urbanity".  Maybe we could bury the wires, and then put up non-functioning public art designed to look like wires and poles.  Then we would be considered forward thinking by the architectural press.

Offline MayDay

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"The same can be said of East 4th Street."

As someone who remembers the former Wig Walk *ahem* East Fourth Street before it was rehabbed, sorry - it was hideous back then. Hideous with a capital F. Urban? Yeah... wig stores are definitely going to attract urbanites with disposable income.

"just take a look at what has happened to Coventry.  It's a shell of it's former self urbanistically."

That's because the people who made Coventry what it was have since moved on, for things like... employment.

Offline zaceman

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well utility poles arent quite a layer of urbanity, maybe you're thinking overhead trolley/light rail wires??  i wouldnt mind some of those...

Offline Map Boy

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W 28th...I think you're defining "urbanistic" in a different way than some of us here.  And not that aesthetic beauty is "urban," but I think Coventry is much more picturesque today than it was 2, 5, 10, 20 years ago.  Sure, the retail mix and clientele is a little different, but what they've done with streetscaping is pretty outstanding...from the decorative elements to the pedestrian crossings...I give 'em an "A!"

I can't really speak to E. 4th, because I didn't really frequent it in the past, but I do remember walking by or down the street and thinking that it was something special...and too bad there's no reason for me to come here!

Gordon Square is unique because it has such fantastic and intact architecture, but the sidewalks are so narrow that you can barely pass a pedestrian going the opposite direction.  And Detroit is no E. 4th...it's a busy street!  I'm not sure how or if they'll widen the sidewalk (taking away on-street parking will be a challenge), but there needs to be something done to make the pedestrian experience better.  I have no doubt in my mind that the cdc is working diligently on this!

Offline w28th

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Mister Good Day, I'm fine with the fact that our definitions may differ, that's what makes this site interesting and why I continue to post.

I just enjoy seeing the city as a space that doesn't have to be prepared for visitors to come and enjoy.  Now it may be utility poles that are removed first because people dont like overhead wires, next it is old school paintings on buildings you see on the buildings along Fleet Ave because people will say the area looks faded or rundown, then traffic lights are removed to speed traffic because people have to drive right? (Little Italys light at Murray Hill and Mayfield was removed, and with it ease of crossing Mayfield for pedestrians and the hustle and bustle of stop and go traffic, not good for commuters, but we should be worrying about the pedestrian here) etc, etc.  Then what?  We are left with a poorly planned, suburban visitor friendly, homogenized version of what something once was.  I realize the nature of cities is that of change, but it should be change for the better, and hopefully if these utility lines are buried something progressive is designed and built there to properly replace the old.  I guess what Im saying is that we need better planning at a city level, (if they got some of us here from urbanohio, I think wed be getting better results, or at least some arguments).

Also, if these utility wires are buried, what will the new lamp posts look like?  Hopefully "new" is the operative word for their appearance, and that the city doesn't see this as a place to install neoclassical light posts.  It would be great if we, gulp, had a DESIGN COMPETITION for new lamp posts replacing the old ones here in Cleveland.
New York City had one a few years ago and the results are pretty cool:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/html/citylights/
"When you stand at the corner of Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street in Cleveland, you stand at one of the busiest corners in the world -- and in the heart of a shopping district known far and wide for its many fine shops."

Offline Map Boy

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I agree, w28th, that sharing different perspectives and opinions is what this site is all about.  I hope you understood that that was what I meant to say in line one of my preious post...

I also agree that we, as a city/region/citizenry, could do a lot more to push the design agenda in our places.  Competitions like the one you mentioned above can do nothing but positive things for the future of our cities by increasing participation, awareness and potentially, the output.  Tokyo has several districts that are distinguished by their street lighting.  I was there for only two weeks, but I began to recognize where I was because of the unique design found in each neighborhood.  Whether this was intentional or just a great side effect, I don't know!

In Gordon Square, I might support something more old-fashioned, merely because that's what was there originally and the buildings at the main intersection (65th & Detroit) were all built prior to 1920.  There's also something to be said for desiging lights that are pedestrian oriented versus street oriented.  You can have more than one lamp on a single post...one at a height of 20 feet or so, for the street, and another at a height of 12 feet or so, for the sidewalk.

I, however, disagree that these efforts are done to make the place friendly primarily to visitors.  Coventry, West 25th, Mayfield, Wade Oval...these are spaces that visitors will certainly enjoy and be more likely to return to than if the sidewalk experience was unimproved, but they are also much greater amenities for neighborhood residents who walk those streets every day...not just once a week/month.  And they are most often the product of neighborhood and stakeholder meetings/workshops that produce the basic ideas that go into the design.  I'll give you that they could be more inclusive, but the initial effort is usually there.  Sometimes it just takes a champion to keep the public involved.  If no one is interested in coming to the meetings, then they'll stop having them.

Offline w28th

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I understand your point to possibly seeing older styled lighting/traffic signals at W65th and Detroit because of the surrounding context, but there is a lot of merit to utilizing the idea of exposing the contrast between new and old as a dynamic design gesture.  It reveals the intricacies and detail of the old (buildings, in the case of W65th & Detroit) vs. the smooth or angled of the contemporary (lighting/signals), playing off the idea of the city being a multilayered organism.  This idea could be used throughout the city in a variety of different programs. 

In a previous thread somebody brought up the idea of using the grain silos near the Center Street swing bridge as some ultra contemporary condominium complex.  I love that.  Imagine how interesting this would look if some weird shaped addition to those silos was designed onto it.  Maybe it engages the river somehow.  Its just an example, but it can be applied to almost anything.

We need to define the time that weve had control of the city, and there is no other way to do that than to always be forward thinking when it comes to urban planning and design.  We should be saying, lets use whats left of this old industrial city to be the most progressive city in the world, aesthetically, and then one would hope at some point, socially.
"When you stand at the corner of Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street in Cleveland, you stand at one of the busiest corners in the world -- and in the heart of a shopping district known far and wide for its many fine shops."

Online StrapHanger

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Great discussion, guys.  Really points to some of the central conceptual design dilemmas facing the city.
"Cleveland, as you see, is not an apple, but a bunch of grapes each of which has its own particular pattern-some large, others small, some round, others long and narrow, some sweet, others sour, some sound, others rotten throughout."  -Howard Whipple Green, 1932

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #100 on: June 20, 2006, 09:48:02 PM »
In a previous thread somebody brought up the idea of using the grain silos near the Center Street swing bridge as some ultra contemporary condominium complex.  I love that.  Imagine how interesting this would look if some weird shaped addition to those silos was designed onto it.  Maybe it engages the river somehow.  It’s just an example, but it can be applied to almost anything.

Thanks! See...
http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php?topic=9270.msg104135#msg104135
« Last Edit: June 20, 2006, 09:49:09 PM by KJP »
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Offline Map Boy

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #101 on: June 21, 2006, 09:39:42 AM »
Yes, I love the grain silo idea...it's been done more than a couple times and in a variety of ways.  I'll post my fave later...

"there is a lot of merit to utilizing the idea of exposing the contrast between new and old as a dynamic design gesture.  It reveals the intricacies and detail of the old (buildings, in the case of W65th & Detroit) vs. the smooth or angled of the contemporary (lighting/signals), playing off the idea of the city being a multilayered organism.  This idea could be used throughout the city in a variety of different programs."

Though I do think that historically appropriate fixtures would be nice in certain places, I do agree with w28th that a program like this could yield some fabulous results!  I think we'd benefit a great deal from something like this and I think it could be a wonderful success (or a colossal failure, who knows?) and why not try?  Cleveland Public Art, local design schools (CIA, UDC, Levin, etc) and the utility companies could run a year-long charette or competition and everyone would end up paying more attention to the little things they pass by each day.  Who could complain about that?

Offline superceleb

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #102 on: July 28, 2006, 10:01:12 AM »
http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=54852

Cleveland neighborhood gets makeover

Reported by  Tom Beres 
Created: 7/26/2006 9:07:23 AM
Updated:7/26/2006 9:43:41 AM

CLEVELAND -- Something exciting is going on in an old Cleveland neighborhood.
It's getting a makeover and becoming a hip place to live and visit.

We're talking about Gordon Square -- along Detroit Avenue between West 58th and West 73rd Streets.

From new and remodeled theaters to galleries and shops, our Senior Political Correspondent Tom Beres shows us the new booming arts district.

Click the "Play Story" link to watch Tom Beres' report.

(Here's the link to the video http://www.wkyc.com/video/player.aspx?aid=25280&bw=)

Offline 3231

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #103 on: July 28, 2006, 11:00:51 AM »
Well, its always good that the local news shines some positive light on the inner city.

Offline 3231

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Re: Cleveland: Detroit/Shoreway & Gordon Square Arts District Developments
« Reply #104 on: October 05, 2006, 01:24:56 PM »
Gypsy coffee moving business near Shoreway
Thursday, October 05, 2006
By David Plata
West Side Sun News
After two decades as a wholesale coffee operation in a Fulton Road warehouse, Gypsy Beans & Baking Co. is moving to the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood.

And while the wholesale coffee sales, serving restaurants in the Greater Cleveland area and beyond, will continue, the new venue also will include a neighborhood coffee house.

I've always been an urban pioneer of sorts, said Niki Gillota, who is spending some $200,000 to move the business and open at the new location.
 
I love being in a community, added Gillota, who has lived in Lakewood about a year but is looking to move back to Cleveland. I think Cleveland is so great for having these little pockets of community that grow and expand and develop around some key players.

The new business covers 2,200 square feet at the southeast corner of West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue, in a former Dollar Store, vacant about two years.

It's awesome, said Councilman Matt Zone, D-17, noting the key players Gillota referred to include the 1point618 art gallery and a new Mediterranean-style restaurant, yet to be named, to be opened by chef Marlin Kaplan _ all of them next to Cleveland Public Theatre.

The project is aided by some $30,000 in city loan and grant funds, including $20,000 routed through Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, which owns the building.

Matt Wiederhold, the group's commercial development director, said the property was kept vacant until the right project came along.

Nothing really fit with the arts district we wanted to do there _ until Niki's proposal, he said.

The fix-up was designed by architect Eli Mahler.

It was pretty much bare-bones space, Gillota said. We had to remove the ceiling and put up a fire barrier; we're redoing the hardwood floors, putting new hardwood floors in toward the front; all of the electrical and plumbing _ things like that.

Gillota said the business, expected to open the second week of November, will have five employees at first.

Hopefully by next summer we'll be up to nine or 10, she said.

She described the new venture, seating about 15 on antique oak or Mission Arts and Crafts tables and chairs, as a European-style coffee house.

That means cappuccino, espresso, drip coffee, she said. I'm using a variety of beans from around the world. Like your Costa Ricans, your South Americans; different roasts of those blends.

Our house blend is going to be a darker roasted mocha java. Mocha javas tend to be smooth and creamier. We want something that's very snappy and palate-cleansing to complement the food and pastries.

Gillota said all pastry _ muffins, scones, quickbreads, such as banana, zucchini carrot, cranberry orange and more _ will be baked on-site.


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