Author Topic: Painesville / Lake County: Development and News  (Read 27171 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Map Boy

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3210
Painesville / Lake County: Development and News
« on: September 15, 2005, 09:43:48 AM »
Home is where sports are
IMG, Beachwood firm planning Lake County resort community
Thursday, September 15, 2005
Joe Guillen

IMG, the Cleveland-based sports marketing firm, is joining forces with a Beachwood development company to build a sports-themed housing community on the former site of a chemical plant in Lake County.

IMG and Hemisphere Development LLC on Wednesday announced their deal to develop regional sports resort communities throughout the country. The first development will be on a 1,100-acre site in Fairport Harbor, along Lake Erie near the Grand River...

more at http://www.cleveland.com
« Last Edit: December 29, 2016, 03:01:28 PM by ColDayMan »

Offline Map Boy

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3210
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2005, 09:46:14 AM »
Also see: http://www.hemispheredev.com/case/lakeview.html

Hemisphere is very active these days, but how about an IMG project in the City of Cleveland?  I know it wouldn't be easy to assemble this much land, but we've definitely got enough brownfields for them to take a look at!

Offline Steele05

  • 367'-PNC Bank
  • **
  • Posts: 53
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2005, 11:02:30 AM »
So what is this the "Cleveland Quarries" east??  Is it even going to compare?  Area-wise they are almost identical.  Sounds interesting reguardless.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2005, 11:18:33 AM by Steele05 »

Offline smackem81

  • 468'-Scripps Center
  • ***
  • Posts: 251
  • Lost in cul-de-sac
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2005, 11:10:16 AM »
Ive been out that way a few times. Its pretty desolate and empty for an area thats near the lake and grand river and is not totaly near absolutely nothing. The area is aproximately as big as all of downtown cleveland proper. .I guess this brownfield stuff is the reason why it was never developed.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2005, 11:12:47 AM by smackem81 »

Offline Map Boy

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3210
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2005, 12:56:02 PM »
This is the sound bite I'm most worried about: "We are essentially building a new city," Davis said.

how is this justified?  will they be pulling mass amounts of people from outside the region?  what about the cities that already exist?  and the one that is slated for construction out in Steele's neck of the woods (Cleveland Quarries)? ? ?
« Last Edit: September 15, 2005, 12:56:25 PM by Mister Good Day »

Offline mrnyc

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 10121
    • friends of the highline
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2005, 01:46:29 PM »
this one is being done by real, known and local developers. the westside amherst quarries golf course version is fronted by a shady euro group we know nothing about. so look for this one as more likely to happen, cross yr fingers on the other. nice move to develop that brownfield area!
"That whole rural thing. It's a joke." Ed Koch

Offline Jim S.

  • 408'-Kettering Tower
  • **
  • Posts: 135
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2005, 04:13:03 PM »

The site is the former Diamond Shamrock. I can remember a lot of nasty smells and smoke in that area in the 70's. Also the large retaining pond fow waste water. It was a pretty torquose color and very toxic. The pond has dried up over the years and just about every time it rains some of the residue leaches into the Grand River. I don't think I would even call it a brown field but a black field along the Love Cannal area. Jim S.

Offline buildingcincinnati

  • aka grasscat
  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 8340
  • Building Cincinnati isn't a job, it's a lifestyle
    • Building Cincinnati
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2005, 03:26:05 PM »
^ That's the same exact article that leads off this thread.  I swear, sometimes I wonder if anyone actually reads the threads.
THE ColDayMan's sig solidifies my status as a UO Hall of Famer.

Offline Steele05

  • 367'-PNC Bank
  • **
  • Posts: 53
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2005, 03:43:19 PM »
HA! My apologies.....  I only skimmed it before, I posted.  Thought I its was a diffrent article.

and it was at 4:34 am, after all... LOL

Offline buildingcincinnati

  • aka grasscat
  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 8340
  • Building Cincinnati isn't a job, it's a lifestyle
    • Building Cincinnati
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2006, 06:45:48 PM »
From the 1/28/06 Willougby News-Herald:


Bluffs to open in 2008
World's first sports-oriented resort community slated for Lake County

By: Brandon C. Baker
BBaker@News-Herald.com
01/28/2006

 
Hemisphere Corp. President Todd Davis announced Friday the Lakeview Bluffs development project should open to the public in spring 2008.

Davis told the Lake County Development Council that Lakeview Bluffs will be the world's first sports-oriented resort community.

Parts of the community will be in three municipalities: Fairport Harbor Village, Painesville city and Painesville Township.

It will be adjacent to Lake Erie, with the Grand River running through it.

Davis describes Bluffs as a "comprehensive, multiphased, high-impact redevelopment project."

"We want this to be the national model for successful brownfield redevelopment," he said.

The community will be built on 1,100 acres of underutilized, vacant land, Davis said.

Bluffs will have about 2,300 residential units, with a mix of single-family homes, condominiums, apartments, permanent residences and time shares, Davis said.

"We're trying to plan for a very broad market," Davis said.

"We are not trying to make this an exclusive resort that no one can afford."

Beachwood-based Hemisphere Corp. has enlisted IMG Worldwide Inc. as a partner for the Lakeview Bluffs development.

IMG is a leader in sports management, Davis said. Lakeview Bluffs will emulate the IMG Academies training facility in Bradenton, Fla., which has been a training site for famous athletes such as Andre Agassi, Michelle Wie and Kevin Garnett, Davis said.

"The concept is to bring that level of training," Davis said. "We want to build a community around that concept of health and wellness."

Lakeview Bluffs will be a tourist attraction and should host about 16 events a year, Davis said. These will include golf tournaments, tennis exhibits, performing arts, chef presentations and a speakers forum.

The community will contain a resort village, luxury hotel, corporate conference area, and a private beach and marina, Davis said.

The 1,100 acres used to be part of the Diamond Shamrock industrial complex. The Ohio Controlling Board will provide $3 million to help with the cleanup of the complex.

The project has been discussed since 2001, Davis said.

It has not received any federal aid to date, but was awarded a $6 million grant from the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund and a $1.1 million grant from the Lake County commissioners.

Davis declined to state the total cost of the project.

The project will undoubtedly bring growth to the three communities it will become a part of, officials say.

"It's a wonderful thing," Painesville Township Trustee Angelo A. Cicconetti said. "It's valuable land, and it's right on Lake Erie.

"There isn't much land left on Lake Erie. It's going to be like a gold coast."

http://www.news-herald.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16019795&BRD=1698&PAG=461&dept_id=21849&rfi=6
THE ColDayMan's sig solidifies my status as a UO Hall of Famer.

Offline buildingcincinnati

  • aka grasscat
  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 8340
  • Building Cincinnati isn't a job, it's a lifestyle
    • Building Cincinnati
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2006, 06:54:32 PM »
From the 8/20/06 News-Herald:


PHOTO: Work continues on the park area of the Lakeview Bluffs development in Painesville Township.  Ken Blaze/KBlaze@News-Herald.com

Hemisphere not bluffing
Brownfield rehabilitation moving forward in Painesville Township

By: Jeffrey L. Frischkorn
JFrischkorn@News-Herald.com
08/20/2006


With determination and a plan that demonstrates flexibility, Hemisphere Corp.'s Lakeview Bluffs project is taking shape.

Even people without a civil engineering background can see that more than just dirt is being moved around.

A drive along Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville Township illustrates that besides soil being shifted, the many ugly buildings - eyesore remnants of the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. chemical plant - have gone under the earth-moving knife.

Yet Hemisphere officials say much more work is required as one of the nation's largest and most ambitious brownfield rehabilitation projects presses forward.

Work on the 1,100-acre Lakeview Bluffs project began in 1995, with site preparation commencing in 2003.
The anticipated completion date is 2008.

"Our goal for this summer is to complete everything north of Fairport-Nursery Road and, by the end of next year, to have all of the environmental issues addressed," said Todd Davis, president of the Beachwood-based Hemisphere.

"We've been making tremendous progress, and every day brings about new and better improvements."

The portion north of Fairport-Nursery Road will cost $20 million alone "when all is said and done," Davis said.

Other objectives will be even more expensive.

Among them is one of the project's showcases, the 250-acre, 18-hole golf course.

This course will straddle Fairport-Nursery Road and abut the Grand River to the south and Lake Erie to the north.
Golfers will have the opportunity to tee off in 2008, with the course likely becoming the only one where holes actually overlook Lake Erie, Davis said.

"Right now we're working with the (Ohio Environmental Protection Agency) and the U.S. EPA to rework the capped area south of Fairport-Nursery Road. The golf course is roughed in," he said.

Davis said Hemisphere will send out bid documents this month for important environmental cleanup work at the site once occupied by the coke plant.

"And we've been able to work through all of the rainy weather, too," Davis said.

Meeting the goals set by Hemisphere first required jumping over environmental hurdles imposed by state and federal regulators.

This effort has proven a challenge within a challenge, Davis said.

The area that had the really nasty stuff - the abandoned coke-making plant - has undergone the necessary remediation work, Davis said.

Virtually all of the former chemical-making buildings straddling Fairport-Nursery Road have been demolished and removed, Davis said.

But Davis said there are "no major problems" or barriers to achieving the project's objectives.

"We are on schedule, and we meet with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency at least once a week," Davis said.

Even the heavy rains of July 28 and the subsequent flooding of the Grand River hardly scratched the project, he said.

"We didn't have any flooding, but the project sits so high up from the river," Davis said.

For its part, the Ohio EPA said Hemisphere has proven itself a cooperative property owner.

"Whenever we've made a request, Hemisphere has done its best to comply," said Teri Heer, an Ohio EPA official who helps oversee the Lakeview Bluffs project.  "And I think we certainly can say this is an ambitious project, which is not to say it wasn't doable."

No unforeseen problems have popped up, Heer said.

But if they do, Hemisphere and the Ohio EPA have contingencies in place to deal with them, he said.

"We have good records - where things were and what went on - and that's been helpful," Heer said.

In order to accomplish its goals, Hemisphere has sought out grants and assistance to help fund the work.

In one instance, the firm was awarded a $3 million Clean Ohio Fund grant for Brownfield redevelopment.

Other important chores remain, though each is being conducted under the constraints of the summer construction season, Davis said.

Among the projects within the larger project is the rehabilitation of 1.2 miles of Lake Erie shoreline.

Here, the slope of the bluff facing the lake is being tempered, while various other modifications are being engineered to improve aesthetics, safety, access and drainage, Davis said.

Offshore, the project will entail the construction of a private marina, utilizing existing offshore structures and bulkheads built when the site was home to the now-defunct Diamond Shamrock chemical plant.

Another Lakeview Bluff centerpiece is the planned Olympic-style village, complete with a state-of-the-art sports center and a 50- to 200-room sports resort hotel.

The company hopes this center will accommodate up to 16 special events annually, including such things as golf tournaments and concerts, Davis said.

Hemisphere is working with Cleveland-based IMG Resorts, an international management group that represents such sports figures as Tiger Woods.

The merger of the minds will lay the foundation for a massive, multipurpose sports complex/campus that is expected to open sometime in 2008.

Called academies, these individual components will segment themselves into various sports disciplines.

The soccer fields, several tennis courts, and baseball and softball fields will allow clients to "train all year round," Davis said.

One of the soccer fields even will be contained in an inflated "bubble" for all-weather play.

"It will be state-of-the-art, where we'll be able to offer many different products," Davis said. "Our goal is to create multiple ports of interest."

He said the hope is to complete the entire development schematic before the original stated 10-year goal.

"We're going to use this a template for similar sites all across the country," Davis said.

Accomplishing any such mission - let alone achieving it on time and on budget - requires cooperation, he said.

And that cooperation extends beyond working with a like-minded management company or developing a non-confrontational posture with state and federal environmental regulators.

Working closely with local communities and county officials also helps smooth over potential rough patches, Davis said. If anything, the cooperation between the communities impacted by the project has been "extraordinarily good."

"All of the communities realize they must work together to get the job done and get it done right," he said.

"That spirit began with the Lake County commissioners, but we've been very fortunate in the way people have come together."

An important element in this synergy, Davis said, is how Hemisphere has approached the project in a "transparent" fashion.

Nothing is being left to chance or being done in smoke-filled rooms or behind people's backs, Davis said.

"We've discussed issues and topics openly and candidly."

The Ohio EPA concurs, said Heer.

"This is Hemisphere's project, but in our public meetings on it, we try to get across to the public exactly what the risks are and how they'll be addressed," Heer said.

Hemisphere pledges to ensure that the public has access to some of the project's amenities and even portions of the property, Davis said.

Public access also is planned for the Grand River.

Here, multiple access points are planned, Davis said.

The planned 1.2-mile lakefront promenade will be publicly accessible as well, he said.

"This will be one of the finest assets for the community."

The Lakeview Bluffs project further calls for the construction of 1,200 housing units; a mix of single-family and condominiums.

These dwellings are planned for both sides of Fairport-Nursery Road.

Also planned is a vineyard and winery, located on the south bank of the Grand River, opposite the gold course's club house.

The so-called "pipe bridge" over the Grand River will undergo a structural facelift with an improved catwalk, allowing foot traffic to move between the clubhouse and the winery.

This bridge was used to carry chemicals over the river and remains one of the area's most familiar landmarks.

"At the end of the day, we want to be proud of the work we've done," Davis said.

"This could become the role model for brownfield development."

The Ohio EPA agrees.

"This is really cutting-edge," Heer said. "The Ohio EPA won't sign off on the project unless it is safe for people and for the environment."

http://www.news-herald.com/site/index.cfm?newsid=17087257&BRD=1698&PAG=461&dept_id=21849&rfi=8
THE ColDayMan's sig solidifies my status as a UO Hall of Famer.

Offline glutmax

  • 408'-Kettering Tower
  • **
  • Posts: 140
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2007, 10:17:21 AM »
Thought some update on this project, courtesy of the News-Herald, would be useful.  Wondering if this development would have much of an effect on greater Cleveland as a whole, or not.  Hope I beat grasscat to it ;)


Dreams of Lakeview beginning to develop
Story by Jeffrey L. Frischkorn and David S. Glasier
06/27/2007
 
Construction workers from Durocher Marine carefully place large rocks recently in an effort to reinforce the shoreline of the Lakeview Bluffs Development project.   
While still a gem in the rough, the massive Lakeview Bluffs project is seemingly on its way to being a cut and
polished stone.

Encompassing more than 1,100 acres in Painesville, Painesville Township and Fairport Harbor, the project ultimately will include an 18-hole golf course, baseball diamonds, soccer fields, a marina, indoor sports complex, hotel, fishing lake, winery, vineyard and 2,200 units of residential dwellings, developers say. A nine-hole golf course might be added later.
When redevelopment of the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. industrial complex began in 2001, the site, bordered by Lake Erie to the north and bisected by the Grand River to the south, had been in disrepair for about 30 years. It was classified as a brownfield by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA defines a brownfield as property needing remediation from chemical contaminants and other hazardous substances.

Up to 250 people a day are working at the site now, including about 20 to 25 environmental consultants. Lakeview Bluffs has been awarded $3 million in voter-approved Clean Ohio Fund grants. When all is said, done and developed, the complex could cost up to $500 million to build. The ambitious project is going forward on a 99-year lease held by Hemisphere Corp. of Beachwood, whose president, Todd Davis, is an environmental lawyer specializing in reclaiming and developing brownfields.

Progress made at the site has been striking in the last 15 months, especially with demolition of the old coke and concrete plants. "I would argue that this is one of the largest and most creative brownfield developments in the country," said Davis, who said he plans to be a Lakeview Bluffs homeowner. "We're counting on this becoming a template for other projects around the country."
During a recent tour of the site with reporters, Davis explained that construction of Lakeview Bluffs is being done in 10 phases.

The marina and lakefront amphitheater are scheduled to open next year. Home sites will be sold beginning next year, too. Barring unexpected delays, home construction will begin in 2009, Davis said.
Davis has struck a deal with International Management Group of Cleveland, one of the world's leading sports management companies. IMG will design and operate the golf course and a multi-sport academy.
Plans call for the golf course, Steelhead Run, to welcome its first players in the summer or fall of 2009. The academy could open in 2009 or 2010.

 
 
Toxic past to green present
Visitors to the site search for words to describe the emergence of Lakeview Bluffs on land formerly dominated by crumbling buildings, rusting vehicles and "soup ponds" laced with toxic chemicals.
About 500,000 yards of material has been moved on the site with at least 1 million more needed, mostly for the golf course. Also, about 30,000 tons of concrete and stone from the site has been recycled and used as road base.

Davis said the project is meeting its remediation goals. Developers and representatives of Ohio EPA have regular meetings to discuss the operation's progress.
"It's amazing, isn't it?" said Terri Heer, Ohio EPA site coordinator. "It's proceeding well, and we're continuing to get documents weekly."
Heer said the project has met with only a few snags, including concrete slab disposal that wasn't initially taken into account.
"That's not an environmental thing, but it has slowed down the project a little," Heer said.

Monitoring by Ohio EPA also has led to materials having to be removed from a couple of sites not included in the original remediation plan.
"As things crop up, they've been able to deal with them," Heer said. "It's a huge project, and they've done an incredible amount in the past few years, removing a lot of soil and bringing in clean fill."
Davis concedes that some people will have trouble getting past the perception that the property remains a highly toxic, dangerous place.
"The history of this site is its history. We embrace it," Davis said. "The project is a challenge, but we want to do this the right way."
Input will be sought from environmental groups to ensure that all operations at Lakeview Bluffs are environmentally friendly, Davis said.
"We want to protect the river corridor as well as the lake," Davis said.

Public welcome
Some areas of Lakeview Bluffs will be reserved for use only by homeowners, sports academy participants and hotel guests. However, it will not be a completely private development.
"There's going to be public access. I'm very, very sensitive to that," Davis said. The project will include a 1.25-mile publicly accessible trail overlooking Lake Erie. The shoreline currently is being "armored" by the installation of large stones and concrete pylons shaped somewhat like a child's jack. Davis said the new shoreline protection is designed to last 50 years.
Hemisphere intends to work closely with Lake Metroparks in developing a walking trail and fishing access to the Grand River along a 2.5-mile stretch of the Grand River.
When the project is completed, it will become a destination place for people seeking the river's "unique natural beauty along with exercise," said David A. Noble, executive director of Lake Metroparks.
"Can you imagine having a river corridor trail stretching for 21/2 miles and holding together two of the river's best steelhead fishing holes - the Uniroyal and Pipe Bridge holes?" Noble added.
The several baseball fields planned for Lakeview Bluffs might even be linked to the existing public fields on East Street in Fairport Harbor, Davis said.

Joint effort
Davis isn't alone on an island in the development of Lakeview Bluffs.
He's received help from Lake County commissioners in obtaining the Clean Ohio Fund grants. Commissioners also have authorized trucking tens of thousands of cubic yards of clay topsoil to Lakeview Bluffs from the county's landfill for capping.

Establishing the market value of the soil has enabled Hemisphere to reach the level of matching funds needed to qualify for Clean Ohio grants.
"This is government at its best," said Raymond E. Sines, president of the Lake County commissioners. "We're doing whatever we can to keep this important project moving forward."
Government officials in the three communities spanned by Lakeview Bluffs continue to monitor developments there with keen interest.
Painesville City Manager Rita McMahon said she and Davis have had "really preliminary" discussions about the impact the project will have on her community during construction and after its opening.
Painesville Township Trustee Jeanette A. Crislip said her community has similar concerns.
"I've got my fingers crossed that it all works out and everyone is satisfied," Crislip said.
Fairport Harbor Mayor Frank J. Sarosy said the fact that only 11 acres of the site are in the village is deceiving.
"The gateway (to Lakeway Bluffs) is Fairport, and 80 percent of the homes planned for there will be in our school district," Sarosy said.
So far, there has been no reported friction between Hemisphere and the four political entities with stakes in the development of Lakeview Bluffs.
"From the very beginning," Davis said, "we've worked so that everyone wins with this project."


AND,


Lakeview Bluffs will be a sports mecca
David S. Glasier
DGlasier@News-Herald.com
06/27/2007
 
International Management Group is aiming high with its designs for the Lakeview Bluffs.
If those designs become reality, by this time in 2010, the reclamation project spanning three Lake County communities will be emerging as a participatory sports mecca offering world-class opportunities for golf, tennis, soccer, baseball, basketball and possibly cross-country skiing.
IMG, a prestigious sports management company based in Cleveland, has been engaged by Lakeview Bluffs developer Todd Davis to design, build and operate a sports academy and allied facilities on the 1,100-acre site in Painesville, Painesville Township and Fairport Harbor.
"We wouldn't have gotten involved at Lakeview Bluffs if we didn't believe it ultimately will be an extremely successful enterprise," said Terri Bell, consultant to special projects for IMG.
With its mix of indoor and outdoor venues, the IMG Resort Recreation Academy at Lakeview Bluffs will share some characteristics with IMG's sprawling sports academy in Bradenton, Fla.
The major difference between the two academies, Bell explained, is that while the Florida location houses young athletes who might someday turn professional, the academy at Lakeview Bluffs will be geared to adults using participatory sports as part of an overall fitness program.
Bell said that IMG's plans call for residents of the estimated 2,200 home sites at Lakeview Bluffs to have preferred access to the Lakeview Bluffs academy, golf course and various playing fields.
"We want to establish this as a lifestyle community," Bell said.
IMG also envisions Lakeview Bluffs as a draw for corporate outings and for guests of the hotel that will be built next to the main academy complex on a large parcel north of Fairport Nursery Road.
The hotel and academy, slated for openings in 2009 or 2010, will have commanding views of Lake Erie.
Among area golfers, there already is anticipation for Steelhead Run, the 18-hole, par-72 course that will snake its way around Lakeview Bluffs with frontage on Lake Erie to the north and the Grand River to the south.
Using five sets of tees and playing at lengths from 5,000 yards to 7,300 yards, the course is the brainchild of Britt Stenson, director of design for IMG Golf.
Stenson's long list of design credits includes championship-caliber courses in Las Vegas, Connecticut and the Tampa Bay area. He's also assisted in course designs by noted touring pros Vijay Singh, Colin Montgomerie and Mark O'Meara.
Stenson said Steelhead Run will offer "an interesting journey around a pretty big piece of property."
The course is being built on land reclaimed from the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. industrial complex. The land formerly was classified as hazardous by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.
"By necessity, because of the environmental issues, you can't go down here to sculpt the course," Stenson said. "But that gives us the opportunity to do a genuine links-style layout where wind will always be a big factor. We'll use tall grasses, sand and mounding to give it shape."
Work has begun on a loop of four holes north of Fairport Nursery Road. The third hole, a long and scenic par-3 routed north toward the lake, is already shaped and planted with the tall grass.
The Steelhead Run clubhouse will be built south of Fairport Nursery Road. Adjacent to the clubhouse will be a double-ended driving range, situational hole, pitching station and putting green.
Barring unexpected delays in construction, Stenson said he hopes to have the first players on the course in the summer or fall of 2009.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2007, 12:15:21 PM by MayDay »
Born in Paine, livin the 'Wood. . .

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2008, 07:41:11 AM »
A quick update from the News Herald in yesterday's paper. Not much new, but it looks like they're hoping to market the project in late 2009 early 2010, depending on market conditions.

I drive by there a lot, and actually was just at a presentation that Davis, Ohio EPA and Lake County Waste Management made on the project for Painesville Twp. It's pretty exciting stuff. They've got a lot of the golf course terraformed already, the bluffs have been pulled back to allow for beachfront access and much of the land has been cleared by the EPA. They even have a vineyard planted. I know it's not downtown, but it's pretty exciting nonetheless.

06/23/2008
Bluffs taking shape  
David S. Glasier
DGlasier@News-Herald.com
 

Experts say development in Fairport Harbor, Painesville and Painesville Township will benefit Northeast Ohio, Lake economies

Superlatives are not spared when professor Robert A. Simons of Cleveland State University discusses the Lakeview Bluffs development taking shape on the former Diamond Shamrock industrial complex in Fairport Harbor, Painesville and Painesville Township.

 
« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 09:55:53 AM by AJ93 »
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline surfohio

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6263
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2008, 08:50:38 AM »
I want to like this project, but I really, truly hate how they're armoring the coastline. That's completely backward, and that kind of thinking is why the Ohio shoreline is so screwed up and has so few beaches. Come on Ohio, WTF.

http://www.jjr-us.com/JJRWaterfronts/Content/Projects/imagesbig/339-01.jpg

Offline jam40jeff

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3766
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2008, 10:52:54 AM »
There's a reason that shoreline is armored...this thing probably shouldn't be being built.  From the Cleveland Scene...kind of long, but a good read...

Badlands
« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 03:17:00 PM by jam40jeff »

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2008, 11:02:42 AM »
I'm not sure what you mean by "armoring the coastline". I think you're talking about the gargantuan boulders they're using to prevent erosion. From the presentation, those were necessary, as the 'surf' was eating away tremendous amounts of the coastline each year.

My understanding is that the waterfront is going to be open for public access, and he's grooming a number of pocket parks, with fire pits, etc. that will be available for use.
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline surfohio

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6263
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2008, 11:43:27 AM »
That's it AJ, I'm talking about the boulders/rocks.

Beaches are supposed to erode, and then replenish. The natural transfer of sand from one place to another is called littoral drift. When that process is messed with extensively, you end up with Ohio, a state with hardly any sand beaches whatsoever. There are other, less harmful options to limit erosion, but unfortunately they are generally not employed here.

http://www.shoregro.com/P03_Coastal%20erosion-options.html

Human influence / hard engineering aka "armoring the coast"

Human influence has and will invariably alter the natural balances in sediment supply. Coastal development will often restrict the natural supply of beach material by armoring the coastline and preventing dune or cliff erosion.

Coastal erosion control structures such as sea walls and revetments are built to defend the shore, not the beach. They will always have a negative impact on a beach, as they will prevent any new material from entering the littoral zone from the shore.

p.s. I did read that  jam40jeff....it's best just not to think about that stuff. Scary!!!
« Last Edit: June 24, 2008, 11:52:59 AM by surfohio »

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2008, 12:25:51 PM »
A couple things about the Scene article.

The "soup pond" which is the settling pond referred to, consisted primarily of the waste from dredging out the salt underground (there are large salt mines under the property into which DS pumped lake water to draw out the salt). As a byproduct, a lot of calcium and another byproduct I can't remember, went into the settling pond. It stunk, looked frothy when it was there, but the stuff is completely non-reactive. Other chemical byproducts did make their way in there, but they were neutralized by the calcium. This is per Ohio EPA, not Davis. They stated it was completely clean, needing no remediation whatsoever. Davis' problem with it is that the ground is a couple feet of chalk, which won't hold any kind of structure unless he's willing to drive footers deep underground. It's actually where he's planting the vineyard, as the soil conditions are perfect for a certain type of vine imported from France. OSU has an agricultural division that's managing it.

The chromium, and byproducts of that process, are all in an area called the "one acre landfill". This area is being capped, and will have nothing on top of it.

The EPA requires that, in addition to the removal of contaminated soil, that all areas that were tested and found to have contamination have between 2' of clean fill on top for recreational purpose (i.e. golf course) and 4' for residential.

Apparently the land that DS was on was mostly clay-like soil, which did a nice job of preventing the contaminants from permeating too deep into the ground, which makes remediation a little easier. Also, the property was shaped like a bowl, preventing a lot of the contaminants from leaving the site (good for the surrounding land).

That said, Hemisphere stated they've spent up to $17MM just to clean up the land where the main plant was in the Northwest quadrant.

I guess the homes will be slab homes (no basements) and there will be a rider on the deed saying owners can't use ground water for any purpose, so there will certainly be marketing challenges.

But given what the EPA was telling us about the amount of testing, and their involvement, I don't think they're going to give the project a green light until they're 100% satisfied that the property is 100% remediated, and Davis indicated he won't build a single structure until the site is 100% cleared by the EPA.
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2008, 12:27:20 PM »
That's it AJ, I'm talking about the boulders/rocks.

Beaches are supposed to erode, and then replenish. The natural transfer of sand from one place to another is called littoral drift. When that process is messed with extensively, you end up with Ohio, a state with hardly any sand beaches whatsoever. There are other, less harmful options to limit erosion, but unfortunately they are generally not employed here.

http://www.shoregro.com/P03_Coastal%20erosion-options.html

Human influence / hard engineering aka "armoring the coast"

Human influence has and will invariably alter the natural balances in sediment supply. Coastal development will often restrict the natural supply of beach material by armoring the coastline and preventing dune or cliff erosion.

Coastal erosion control structures such as sea walls and revetments are built to defend the shore, not the beach. They will always have a negative impact on a beach, as they will prevent any new material from entering the littoral zone from the shore.

p.s. I did read that  jam40jeff....it's best just not to think about that stuff. Scary!!!


BTW, thanks for the primer on beaches / erosion prevention options. I learned something today :-)
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline surfohio

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6263
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2008, 08:17:09 AM »
^ There is a quiz on Friday!!!

Offline glutmax

  • 408'-Kettering Tower
  • **
  • Posts: 140
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2008, 02:55:14 AM »
-The Scene article is actually pretty upsetting- in that they have been rehabbing that sight from atleast 1998 when they were capping wells both physically on that sight and to the west- in Mentor Headlands- at the same time.  The ground soil- and the brine wells- which are the worrisome pollution- are removed and/or isolated- allowing IMG to develop 1000 acres of upto now (and rightfully so) unused lake/riverfront land.  I guess my point would be, that IMG would not develop land meant for the use of 8-17 year-olds that would allow them to be found liable for gross misrepresentation.  Everybody in the universe knows that this was industrial, the EPA had to sign off on it. Unlike the Scene- I find it hard to belive that a company would expose itself to this type of litigation without researching the ramifications of building upon this site.
Born in Paine, livin the 'Wood. . .

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2009, 09:41:38 AM »
News Herald had an update piece on the Lakeview Bluffs project. Not much new, but here it is.

Developer isn't bluffing about Lakeview project / Hemisphere Corp. president says work has slowed, hopes for stimulus money

Monday, March 9, 2009 12:31 AM EDT

By Jason Lea
JLea@News-Herald.com

Todd Davis received a call on election day from Painesville City Manager Rita McMahon.

There had been a rumor around the polls that the Lakeview Bluffs project was on hold.

"Nothing could be further from the truth," Davis assured her.

Davis is the president of Hemisphere Corp. in Beachwood. His company is in the process of turning 1,100 acres of caterpillar into a redeveloped butterfly. The bluffs encompass parts of Painesville, Painesville Township and Fairport Harbor. It was an environmental quagmire because of its history as the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. industrial complex.


URL: http://www.news-herald.com/articles/2009/03/08/news/nh578113.prt

© 2009 news-herald.com, a Journal Register Property
« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 09:34:27 AM by AJ93 »
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2009, 12:05:08 PM »
News Herald had an update piece on the Lakeview Bluffs project. Not much new, but here it is.

Developer isn't bluffing about Lakeview project / Hemisphere Corp. president says work has slowed, hopes for stimulus money

Monday, March 9, 2009 12:31 AM EDT

By Jason Lea
JLea@News-Herald.com


Davis is the president of Hemisphere Corp. in Beachwood. His company is in the process of turning 1,100 acres of caterpillar into a redeveloped butterfly. The bluffs encompass parts of Painesville, Painesville Township and Fairport Harbor. It was an environmental quagmire because of its history as the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. industrial complex.

As recently as November 2000, 42,000 gallons of liquid and 571 tons of contaminated soil had to be removed from it because hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen, leaked from the previously capped chromate pond during sewer construction.



"an environmental quagmire"? That's putting it mildly! I'm guessing the "capped chromate pond" is what we referred to as the "soup pond" growing up not far from there in Painesville's north end. I remember "steam" blowing toward my neighborhood on warm, summer days. I'm surprised I'm still alive. Although I remember riding my bike with a friend along the perimeter of said pond, on a dam-like berm several feet above the surface--truly a sight to behold, with dead trees poking out of a silvery-gray marbleized lake of toxic sludge--like the surface of some distant planet, hoping I wouldn't hit a rock and lose my balance and fall in. Ah, memories.

Offline MyTwoSense

  • 40+ and Fly
  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 21067
  • back with a vengeance!
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2009, 12:50:54 PM »
EVD's 3D sci-fi experience!  lol
my 2 ¢     Please Sell Crazy Someplace Else....We Have Excess Inventory Here!!

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2009, 01:14:49 PM »
EVD's 3D sci-fi experience!  lol

honestly, I wish I had pictures of this place (someone has to have pix out there), it was so eerie; and surrounding the soup pond was an area of abandoned salt mines (Morton Salt)--little white wooden huts that had some sort of pumps deep into the ground. I remember taking a tour of the Diamond Shamrock plant for chemistry class; they made us walk up and down catwalks over vats of Lord-knows-what. There was a constant stench, and mounds of what looked like some sort of sulphuric dust everywhere. I don't know how anyone who worked there made it past age 40; but at its peak it was the biggest employer in the area. Really, if you had seen that area 40 years ago (or probably even 10 years ago)  the last thing you would have imagined would be a setting for outdoor pleasure activities and upscale housing!

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2009, 08:21:50 AM »
News Herald had an update piece on the Lakeview Bluffs project. Not much new, but here it is.

Developer isn't bluffing about Lakeview project / Hemisphere Corp. president says work has slowed, hopes for stimulus money

Monday, March 9, 2009 12:31 AM EDT

By Jason Lea
JLea@News-Herald.com


Davis is the president of Hemisphere Corp. in Beachwood. His company is in the process of turning 1,100 acres of caterpillar into a redeveloped butterfly. The bluffs encompass parts of Painesville, Painesville Township and Fairport Harbor. It was an environmental quagmire because of its history as the former Diamond Shamrock Corp. industrial complex.

As recently as November 2000, 42,000 gallons of liquid and 571 tons of contaminated soil had to be removed from it because hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen, leaked from the previously capped chromate pond during sewer construction.



"an environmental quagmire"? That's putting it mildly! I'm guessing the "capped chromate pond" is what we referred to as the "soup pond" growing up not far from there in Painesville's north end. I remember "steam" blowing toward my neighborhood on warm, summer days. I'm surprised I'm still alive. Although I remember riding my bike with a friend along the perimeter of said pond, on a dam-like berm several feet above the surface--truly a sight to behold, with dead trees poking out of a silvery-gray marbleized lake of toxic sludge--like the surface of some distant planet, hoping I wouldn't hit a rock and lose my balance and fall in. Ah, memories.

It's funny everyone brings up the soup pond. I met Todd Davis once and he was telling me that the soup pond was ironically one of the cleanest sites on the property. I guess it was the holding pond for the salt dredging they did underground (there's large salt mines under the property that DS used to pump lake water into to draw out...consequently, apparently there's huge empty caves under a lot of Painesville now as a result of that process).

The soup pond was mostly calcium and some other non-reactive byproduct. There was other stuff that got pumped in there as well, but the calcium neutralized it. It stunk like h#ll, but wasn't necessarily dangerous.  The EPA came in and after testing said the ground was fine, and little to no remediation was necessary.

Hemisphere's problem is that the land there is a few feet of basically chalk, and can't sustain any kind of building. So he has to find alternate uses for the land.

There's other parts of the property that were horrifically contaminated and there's about a 1 acre piece of land that was a chromium dump site that he's just capping/sealing off and doing nothing with, because he'll never be able to clean it up. But the soup pond ended up being one of the least problematic sites of the whole project.
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #26 on: March 12, 2009, 11:43:52 AM »
^Okay, apparently I was confusing the soup pond with the other site mentioned. Whatever the case, none of it was conducive to healthy living. As a matter of fact, next door to the Diamond was the Industrial Rayon Corporation (I don’t think that’s still there, is it?), which by all accounts was an even more egregious polluter that DS; and next to that was Painesville Township Park, on a bluff overlooking Lake Erie with a narrow beach below—not sure how polluted the water was, but back in the 60’s the whole lake around Cleveland was pretty bad. I read recently that people who lived closest to the Diamond along the roads right next to the plant had experienced higher-than-average rates of cancer—no surprise there. I just remember that from the edge of the soup pond--with the skyline of the Diamond as a backdrop—it was the most surreal landscape imaginable.

Online AJ93

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3154
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2009, 01:13:16 PM »
I never saw it first hand, but from what I've heard, the soup pond was what you were talking about. Eerie to look at, smelled like god only knows what, weird looking vapors, etc. All a byproduct of the salt mining process (primarily anyway).

The funny thing is that the soil conditions there now are perfect for planting a vineyard, which is exactly what he's doing. He had OSU's agriculture dep't test the soil and they confirmed it was perfect for a certain French vine, which they imported / planted. Don't know that I'm so convinced of his remediation abilities to actually drink a wine from grapes that were grown there, though.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2009, 01:14:19 PM by AJ93 »
Cleveland: Tell your dame it's the bee's knees! - 327

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2009, 01:17:49 PM »
http://www.news-herald.com/articles/2009/07/22/news/nh1206038.txt

Developer of Bluffs upbeat on progress

Published: Wednesday, July 22, 2009


By David S. Glasier 
DGlasier@News-Herald.com

« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 01:49:30 PM by eastvillagedon »

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2013, 12:41:32 PM »
I hope this isn't going to end up being one of those pie-in-the-sky failed urban "renewal" schemes for which Painesville is so well known. Has anyone heard of Knott Construction? All I can think of is Don Knotts--lol! (since I was born on this spot of land at the very least I expect a shrine in my honor)

Painesville OKs developer for site of former LakeEast Hospital

http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20131226/painesville-oks-developer-for-site-of-former-lakeeast-hospital


Painesville City Council approved a developer for the site left vacant when Lake Health’s LakeEast Hospital moved to Concord Township in 2009.

David Knott of Knott Construction will move forward with preliminary planning of what is expected to host residences and various types of commercial properties.

Council approved Knott at its regular Dec. 16 meeting.

“It will be a mix of some local unique shops and then some national chains, a good fit to transition the area between (Lake Erie) College and the downtown,” said Painesville Economic Development Coordinator Cathy Bieterman.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2014, 09:54:30 AM by ColDayMan »

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2014, 02:29:18 PM »
I thought I would transform this into a general P'ville development thread, since, well, not that much really happens there :laugh:. This article is a good summary and mini-history of why the town got so messed up (to use a euphemism) in the first place, something I've been ranting about forever, and hopes for revival. But in truth, its sort of a microcosm of what sadly happened to larger cities in Ohio and across much of the country--

Restoring Painesville: The history, the breakdown and attempts to revitalize the city

http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20140614/restoring-painesville-the-history-the-breakdown-and-attempts-to-revitalize-the-city


Painesville in 1907 (courtesy of the Lake County Historical Society)

By Devon Turchan, The News-Herald
POSTED: 06/14/14, 11:15 PM EDT

Lifelong Painesville resident Tony Torre is unimpressed with many of the changes taking place in his city. The Main Street Streetscape project currently underway will widen the north sidewalk and narrow the roadway.

Driving down the streets of downtown Painesville in the early decades of the 1900s, the lucky owner of a Model T would have seen hundreds of people out and about.

Families would have been strolling, buying ice cream, having a hat repaired or visiting the area’s only bank.

From the time of its first settlers in 1800 until the post-World War II era, the village once known as Champion was a significant commerce hub for the Western Reserve.

Tony Torre has lived in Painesville for the 88 years since he was born and is a witness to the extreme difference from then to now.
“The sidewalks were always full of people,” he said, standing in a parking lot on Main Street where a thriving department store called Gale G. Grant and an ice cream store called Isaly’s Ice cream formerly stood. “The manager of Isaly’s had a daughter ... I went there so often I started dating the daughter. And I married her.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2014, 09:51:28 PM by eastvillagedon »

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2015, 12:07:19 PM »
It might be a little bit of a stretch to call this area an "historic district," but the railroad museum is good idea--

City interested in adding preservation district for Painesville Railroad Museum

http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20150128/city-interested-in-adding-preservation-district-for-painesville-railroad-museum

"City officials in Painesville are looking at adding momentum to a local group’s efforts in preserving and restoring a historic railroad station.

Painesville Ward 1 Councilman Andrew Flock is gathering support on a proposal to establish a historic preservation district around Railroad Street, the Painesville Railroad Museum that sits along the brick street, all the land north of the street, and an 80-year-old restaurant that sits across the street from the museum."



Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2015, 01:34:01 PM »
Apart from the name--High Pointe Centre (which sounds generic and pretentious at once)--maybe this will provide some hope (I'm trying not to be too cynical--shades of the New Market Mall :laugh:). While only in a crude planning stage at least this constitutes some progress; but the only reason this empty tract of land exists is because they tore the century old hospital down! (but that's dwelling in the past). I do find it somewhat amusing how the city is now trying to integrate Lake Erie College more into the fabric of Painesville, albeit out of economic necessity. For most of its 150+ years, Lake Erie was regarded (at least by us "townies") as a somewhat snobby women's college (modeled after Mt. Holyoke), but now for thirty or so years it has been coed--and very sports-oriented (the schools founders must be rolling over in their graves). Ah well, like everybody else here, I hope they put in a Trader Joe's (and that doesn't seem so farfetched--at least to me. While Painesville city's demographics obviously aren't appealing enough for a TJ's, the surrounding communities--Mentor, etc.--would certainly shop there)

Painesville's State of the City touches on role of High Pointe Centre

http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20150201/painesvilles-state-of-the-city-touches-on-role-of-high-pointe-centre

By Matt Skrajner, The News-Herald
POSTED: 02/01/15, 12:01 AM EST | UPDATED: 34 SECS AGO 3


At the annual Painesville State of the City address on Jan. 29, the proposed development plan for the former Lake East Hospital site was at the center of much of the discussion. 

Now known as High Pointe Centre, the project was the subject of about a half dozen inquiries from the audience at the Elks Lodge Painesville 0549 during the new question-and-answer format of the address.

Painesville City Manager Anthony Carson said the space at Liberty and East Washington streets that’s currently empty after the hospital was demolished in December 2010 will be the key in the continuing revitalization of the downtown area.

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2015, 01:31:50 PM »
I thought it was time for an update on Painesville "developments," but since there generally aren't any to speak of, I'll just post this:

The nearly completed streetscape project, a portion of which is shown here, has reached a snag, as the contractor has bailed from the project for some reason (I guess I should know more details but don't. Whatever). But as you can see, "beautification" efforts continue apace downtown as there is very little traffic or pedestrian activity to impede them (okay, that was way too cynical, even for me). They even recruited a bunch of elementary school kids to "volunteer" (I hope at least they got pizza or something to reward their labors). What's more disturbing though, is that in the second picture (w/kids), the building in the background is slated for demolition. It dates from the 1920's and I remember it as a Sears store (back when it was still Sears, Roebuck & Co and looked like something from the 1940's). Apparently the building was sold for a bargain price (even for Painesville!) and will be replaced with a (probably ugly) government services structure. Another piece of history soon to be gone :-( (it's not like the town is lacking in empty spaces--i.e. parking lots--to build anew) But hope springs eternal, as a "First Fridays" program will kick off June 5 (I wonder what "Many Shops and Restaurants" they're talking about :wtf:)








« Last Edit: May 21, 2015, 01:38:50 PM by eastvillagedon »

Offline eastvillagedon

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3985
Re: Lake County: Development and News
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2015, 01:31:13 PM »
Fairport Harbor: the new Orlando (?!?!)

Water park proposed for Fairport Harbor

http://www.wkyc.com/story/news/local/lake-county/2015/05/21/fairport-harbor-could-be-getting-water-park/27695959/


FAIRPORT HARBOR, Ohio -- Major developments could be coming to Fairport Harbor. The village has views from Lake Erie and the Grand River. Now developers want to use those amenities for a brand new amenity.

Walk around Fairport Harbor and you'll see the word is starting to get around, they may be getting a new water park.

"It would be good for my business, it would be good for my neighborhood," said Fairport Harbor resident Rusty Phillips. "I think it needs it tremendously. If you look around, there's a lot of boarded up buildings, makes you want to scratch your head when we have one of the best resources in Lake Erie sitting right there in our backyard. There's no reason this community cannot grow and become something special."
« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 12:27:22 AM by ColDayMan »

Remove Ads