Author Topic: Cincinnati: Kroger  (Read 38912 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online taestell

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5523
  • 부자태
    • UrbanCincy
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #245 on: June 18, 2017, 02:13:43 PM »
Complaining to customer service also happens among the upper middle class. There's a reason the "Can I speak to a manager?" haircut meme exists.
Check out my photography on Flickr or Instagram | Twitter: @urbancincy & @taestell | The UrbanCincy Podcast (iTunes)

Online David

  • Premium Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7045
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #246 on: June 18, 2017, 10:45:20 PM »
I miss being a restaurant manager. I loved it when customers were being totally unreasonable and didn't like what I had to say regarding our policies and would ask to speak to the manager. "I'm the highest ranking one here!" That was the best part of having a managerial job. The worst part was employees accusing me of 'targeting' them. I got hit with that so much, when I'd write people up or pull them aside to talk to them about their shinanigans. Like reprimanding employees for no-call no-shows or playing on their phones all shift or stealing is something they're protected from under 'Hostile Work Environment' laws. "I really feel like you're targeting me." I'd tell them, "Really!? You're the fifth person to tell me that this week!"  :laugh:

I worked at the Kroger in Kenwood when I was 16-18. Looking back, I remember working with a lot of extremely intelligent co-workers. For whatever reason, it does seem like Kroger attracts quality workers.  I was just a bagger and someone who pushed all the carts back into the entrance while I was in High School. There were a lot of older ladies from Indian Hill who would have me help load their heavy groceries into their trunk and tip me really well. Back then, a $5-$10 tip to load some groceries into a car made me feel like I hit the lottery! It was a fairly menial job but it put a decent amount of money in my pocket and it was cool that I could just cash my check at customer service. I had to pay union dues and I always thought that was stupid considering it was a minimum wage job. I thought it defeated the purpose of a union if after union dues, I'm actually making less than minimum wage. They provided health insurance but I was a minor and didn't have any reason to care about how my health insurance was going to be paid. Especially since, if you were poor, you were basically guaranteed free healthcare in Hamilton Co. anyway and I'm sure that's one contributing factor in Kroger being so friendly towards minors.

I couldn't believe how many folks I worked with at Kroger had college degrees and were cashiers or worked in whatever department or made $8-$10 an hour working customer service. I had a lot of really cool, interesting co-workers. They were insanely intelligent, well-educated people who were just helping to peddle groceries for a living, to get by. I think that was my earliest experience in seeing the harsh reality of how worthless a LOT of college degrees can be.

I only got a 10% discount at that job and it only applied to Kroger brand merchandise, so obviously their profit margins are very low. Overall, it was a pretty cool place to work, though. I really wish I would have put half of my paychecks into buying Kroger stock back then. It was definitely heavily discounted in some way that I can't quite remember. They matched what I would have bought or the stock was just straight-up discounted. Something like that.

I remember the word "Shrink." Apparently 1% of their products are stolen. That actually doesn't seem very bad for any sort of retail store. When I worked at Old Navy from age 16-18, I watched women walk out in handcuffs on a daily or weekly basis from stealing. They even had a loss prevention specialist who went to insane extremes to catch people stealing but that's a lengthy (although extremely hilarious) post for another time. It really didn't seem like people stole from Kroger much. I think food stamps play a big part in that.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2017, 11:06:49 PM by David »
Modern architects recognize 300 masterpieces but ignore the other 30 million buildings that have ruined the world. - Andres Duany

Online Brutus_buckeye

  • 771'-Terminal Tower
  • *******
  • Posts: 1241
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #247 on: June 18, 2017, 11:00:35 PM »
I just don't see this Amazon thing as the end of the world for Kroger. Just because they bought Whole Foods does not mean they understand how to run a grocery business. They purchased a company that was struggling in the marketplace and being eaten alive by Kroger. Amazon is leaving the management team there intact. I don't see how that changes the course of Whole Foods.

Now, Amazon does bring the cache of throwing tons of money into propping up the business but again, that assumes they know what they are doing in the grocery business. It is going to take them a while to get up to speed to even make a dent in the industry.

Everyone assumes Amazon is the most amazing company, but they really do not make much of a profit. What amazes me is how they get their investors to hang with them for so long on this potential that may never come. I still think they are a house of cards

Online David

  • Premium Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7045
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #248 on: June 18, 2017, 11:09:58 PM »
Personally, I think Amazon is spreading themselves too thin with this acquisition. It's far from being seamless. It's sort of like AOL-Time-Warner. If anything, it'll probably strengthen Kroger through increased sales. Have they even mentioned anything about upholding the same (or exceeding) WF's standards and mission? Hell, even if they have, I'm not sure that their customers would buy it without being skeptical and highly critical.
Modern architects recognize 300 masterpieces but ignore the other 30 million buildings that have ruined the world. - Andres Duany

Online David

  • Premium Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7045
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #249 on: June 18, 2017, 11:33:42 PM »
From the limited stuff I've read, I think the biggest threat to any company, from Amazon is their plan for home delivery, especially with drones. People would be such suckers for that. Consumers would compromise quality and value to have something home-delivered. Sadly, people just don't like to leave their house. They want to stay in the A/C. Perhaps people on food stamps would even pay cash for home delivery if they don't have a car and have no way out to the grocery store. Air traffic regulations regarding drones are still in the most primitive stage right now, and although  it may be in the distant future, I know it's part of Amazon's plan and if it truly is a practical long-term goal, it makes me think Kroger also needs to consider those high-tech initiatives.

One interesting thing about it though, is how the set-up of retail stores affect the psychology of the consumer. As you enter, you're immediately bombarded with stuff in front that you probably don't need but are tempted to buy because...well, we're human. The practical and cheap (often directly or indirectly subsidized) items such as produce, dairy (milk, eggs and whatnot) as well as grains - which Americans are led to believe they should consume a ridiculous amount of, as well as fresh meats (these departments are the main reason we go to these stores in the first place) are all on the fringes/ at the extremity of these giant stores. Their carefully engineered layout is very effective in terms of maximizing sales.  Home delivery eliminates any chance of using corporate psychology tactics but at the end of the day, we live in a very consumer-driven society where people know exactly what they want and demand it. Any company who doesn't comply with those demands will quickly become irrelevant and fade into obscurity. Even though Amazon isn't used to the grocery business, I feel like they understand the behavior of the consumer pretty well in that regard.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2017, 11:36:58 PM by David »
Modern architects recognize 300 masterpieces but ignore the other 30 million buildings that have ruined the world. - Andres Duany

Online taestell

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5523
  • 부자태
    • UrbanCincy
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #250 on: June 19, 2017, 10:14:01 AM »
I just don't see this Amazon thing as the end of the world for Kroger. Just because they bought Whole Foods does not mean they understand how to run a grocery business. They purchased a company that was struggling in the marketplace and being eaten alive by Kroger. Amazon is leaving the management team there intact. I don't see how that changes the course of Whole Foods.

Now, Amazon does bring the cache of throwing tons of money into propping up the business but again, that assumes they know what they are doing in the grocery business. It is going to take them a while to get up to speed to even make a dent in the industry.

Everyone assumes Amazon is the most amazing company, but they really do not make much of a profit. What amazes me is how they get their investors to hang with them for so long on this potential that may never come. I still think they are a house of cards

Well Amazon bought Whole Foods, which does know how to run a grocery business. What Amazon does extremely well is build all the behind the scenes infrastructure and logistics. If Amazon can use their knowledge to optimize Whole Foods' supply chain, they can squeeze more profit out of it.

Whole Foods has always been smart about having events in the store to draw people in, and people might buy a thing or two while they're in the store. In an era when so much shopping is shifting online, it will make a lot of sense for Amazon to add pick-up locations inside Whole Foods. People will go pick up their package and then remember that they need some milk. Amazon operates some pick-up locations inside 7 Eleven convenience stores, but with Whole Foods, they can now profit on both sides of the deal.
Check out my photography on Flickr or Instagram | Twitter: @urbancincy & @taestell | The UrbanCincy Podcast (iTunes)

Online Brutus_buckeye

  • 771'-Terminal Tower
  • *******
  • Posts: 1241
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #251 on: June 19, 2017, 10:47:47 AM »
^ Whole Foods was getting eaten alive by Kroger. Amazon did not buy Whole Foods because it was the pretty girl at the party, they were a wounded duck with a name. Kroger had their look at Whole Foods and passed as the value was not there.

Amazon is interesting because they have a huge market cap, but they still have yet to turn consistent profits. It seems like they want to control household products and staples, but they almost are spreading themselves too thin in doing it. It almost seems less about groceries and more of a logistics play to me with their ever expanding air hubs and ground delivery, they are developing the critical mass to put UPS and FedEx out of business and develop monopoly power in that arena

Offline jmecklenborg

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 10824
  • An Apollo Legend
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #252 on: June 19, 2017, 11:26:12 AM »
From the limited stuff I've read, I think the biggest threat to any company, from Amazon is their plan for home delivery, especially with drones. People would be such suckers for that. Consumers would compromise quality and value to have something home-delivered.

I'm still amazed by how dazzled the public was by that drone news 2~ years ago.  Everyone (not me, of course) thought that the drones were going to be in the air by the end of the year.  Here we are several years later and it's not happening.  But everyone is still dazzled. 

I think Amazon's core business is lazy, disorganized, and emotional people. 

« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 12:30:34 PM by jmecklenborg »

Online Gramarye

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 5061
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #253 on: June 19, 2017, 11:35:30 AM »
One interesting thing about it though, is how the set-up of retail stores affect the psychology of the consumer. As you enter, you're immediately bombarded with stuff in front that you probably don't need but are tempted to buy because...well, we're human. The practical and cheap (often directly or indirectly subsidized) items such as produce, dairy (milk, eggs and whatnot) as well as grains - which Americans are led to believe they should consume a ridiculous amount of, as well as fresh meats (these departments are the main reason we go to these stores in the first place) are all on the fringes/ at the extremity of these giant stores. Their carefully engineered layout is very effective in terms of maximizing sales.  Home delivery eliminates any chance of using corporate psychology tactics but at the end of the day, we live in a very consumer-driven society where people know exactly what they want and demand it.

Amazon has plenty of its own ways of getting product suggestions to its customers' eyeballs.  Physical placement in a brick and mortar store is not the only way to do that.  Not by a long shot.

^ Whole Foods was getting eaten alive by Kroger. Amazon did not buy Whole Foods because it was the pretty girl at the party, they were a wounded duck with a name. Kroger had their look at Whole Foods and passed as the value was not there.

Kroger's market cap is about $20B.  Acquiring Whole Foods for $13.7B would have been a bet-the-company move on their part, and would have expanded them only slightly in a market that they are already in.  Amazon is around $440B; even if this acquisition flames out, Amazon will survive.  Moreover, Amazon acquired 450 stores to expand a base of about 5.  Kroger operates nearly 2800 stores, according to the Investor Relations page that I just checked.  Adding 450 stores (at a cost of about $30M per store) would make no sense for Kroger; it could build more than 450 news stores for that price if it needed it, to its own specifications and in locations of its own choosing.  Acquiring the various contracts and relationships and brand of Whole Foods would be of less interest to Kroger than to Amazon.

Quote
Amazon is interesting because they have a huge market cap, but they still have yet to turn consistent profits. It seems like they want to control household products and staples, but they almost are spreading themselves too thin in doing it. It almost seems less about groceries and more of a logistics play to me with their ever expanding air hubs and ground delivery, they are developing the critical mass to put UPS and FedEx out of business and develop monopoly power in that arena

Amazon is enormously misunderstood by people who look only at the bottom line of financial statements and never bother to read in the middle.

Amazon turns solid gross profits and almost never sells goods or services at a loss.  Its revenue last year was around $136B.  Its current market cap is around $440B.  Of course, its reported earnings barely qualify as break-even for a market cap of that size.  But it has been financing almost all of its capital needs out of gross profits rather than tapping capital markets.  Amazon obviously has a monstrous build-out of distribution centers, data centers, etc., as well as an impressive IP portfolio.  All of that, and Amazon's total long-term debt is around $15B (and they've been doing that largely because AAA corporate debt has just been so cheap that their CFO couldn't justify not doing it--they ended 2012 with about $3.8B in long-term debt and they could operate completely debt-free if they wanted).  And of course Amazon's assets are revenue-generating.  That's $136B in revenue every year (and growing) supported by a comparatively tiny amount of debt, because Amazon has been growing just by relying on its operating budget.

The "Amazon doesn't turn a profit" argument would be a lot stronger if Amazon were financing its expansion with borrowed money and still not showing a profit.  In fact, if Amazon was more short-term-focused and wanted to play some games with the balance sheets, it could look more profitable simply by borrowing more long-term debt (which wouldn't appear on the income statement, though it obviously would on the cash flow statement) and retaining more of its revenue on an annual basis as earnings, essentially throwing a party today by casting the expense of expansion far enough into the future that only a tiny portion of it would appear on this year's income statement.  Certainly there are activist Wall Street funds that have done that to less well-fortified companies, forcing them to focus on the short term to placate corporate raiders.  Amazon's success has allowed it to grow large enough fast enough to be resistant to such tactics.

Offline GCrites80s

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6472
  • Running Free
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #254 on: June 19, 2017, 11:35:33 AM »
From the limited stuff I've read, I think the biggest threat to any company, from Amazon is their plan for home delivery, especially with drones. People would be such suckers for that. Consumers would compromise quality and value to have something home-delivered.

I'm still amazed by how dazzled the public was by that drone news 2~ years ago.  Everyone bought that the drones were going to be in the air by the end of the year.  Here we are several years later and it's not happening.  But everyone is still dazzled. 

I think Amazon's core business is lazy, disorganized, and emotional people. 




We might eventually find out that is true of all the biggest names on the internet. That's another reason net neutrality is important -- keeping niche areas of the internet alive so that the smart, interesting and fun people still have a place to congregate.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 11:35:59 AM by GCrites80s »

Offline jmecklenborg

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 10824
  • An Apollo Legend
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #255 on: June 19, 2017, 12:35:18 PM »
  Amazon's success has allowed it to grow large enough fast enough to be resistant to such tactics.

I'm not sure that the world has gained anything by Amazon's "success".  It has merely shifted low-wage workers from one realm to another and enabled people to be a little lazier and sloppier. 

Similarly, Kroger's gradual evolution from neighborhood stores to "supermarkets" has served no public good either.  People might save $100 annually on their groceries thanks to the greater scale, but they now must drive further to do something that people historically walked to, so there is no way they're coming out ahead. 

Online Gramarye

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 5061
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #256 on: June 19, 2017, 01:14:24 PM »
  Amazon's success has allowed it to grow large enough fast enough to be resistant to such tactics.

I'm not sure that the world has gained anything by Amazon's "success".  It has merely shifted low-wage workers from one realm to another and enabled people to be a little lazier and sloppier.

You call it lazier and sloppier, I call it managing to avoid unnecessary shopping trips in a household with two working adults (one of whom is pregnant) and one two-year-old.  Of course we make plenty of trips to the regular grocery store as well, and we likely still will even when the Whole Foods 365, now owned by Amazon, opens in Akron.

I also call it greatly streamlining the process of shopping for Christmas presents for my nieces and little cousins who live in other states.  You can say I'm too lazy to buy presents locally, wrap them myself, then get them into UPS boxes, then ship the boxes containing the wrapped boxes across the country.  You'd even be right.  But I still definitely call that a gain.

Amazon Echo's voice-activated home technology has also made it a lot easier to get music playing for my kid when I'm also juggling way too many other things, as parents sometimes are (especially right when they get in the door).  Maybe I'm spoiling him and he ought to learn to wait, but I call it value added when he doesn't have to.

Online taestell

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5523
  • 부자태
    • UrbanCincy
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #257 on: June 19, 2017, 01:18:47 PM »
Similarly, Kroger's gradual evolution from neighborhood stores to "supermarkets" has served no public good either.  People might save $100 annually on their groceries thanks to the greater scale, but they now must drive further to do something that people historically walked to, so there is no way they're coming out ahead. 

BTW, I have heard some rumblings that Kroger is disappointed by the performance of their new giant Marketplace store in Oakley. This might be the first sign (to Kroger) that their strategy of closing down all the neighborhood stores and consolidating them into mega big box stores isn't going to work every time. They should've learned this lesson after the opened the giant Newport store and then found out that the tiny Bellevue store kept doing well...because not everybody wants to do their grocery stopping in a mega store.
Check out my photography on Flickr or Instagram | Twitter: @urbancincy & @taestell | The UrbanCincy Podcast (iTunes)

Offline jmicha

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3641
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #258 on: June 19, 2017, 01:22:37 PM »
  Amazon's success has allowed it to grow large enough fast enough to be resistant to such tactics.

I'm not sure that the world has gained anything by Amazon's "success".  It has merely shifted low-wage workers from one realm to another and enabled people to be a little lazier and sloppier.

You call it lazier and sloppier, I call it managing to avoid unnecessary shopping trips in a household with two working adults (one of whom is pregnant) and one two-year-old.  Of course we make plenty of trips to the regular grocery store as well, and we likely still will even when the Whole Foods 365, now owned by Amazon, opens in Akron.

I also call it greatly streamlining the process of shopping for Christmas presents for my nieces and little cousins who live in other states.  You can say I'm too lazy to buy presents locally, wrap them myself, then get them into UPS boxes, then ship the boxes containing the wrapped boxes across the country.  You'd even be right.  But I still definitely call that a gain.

Amazon Echo's voice-activated home technology has also made it a lot easier to get music playing for my kid when I'm also juggling way too many other things, as parents sometimes are (especially right when they get in the door).  Maybe I'm spoiling him and he ought to learn to wait, but I call it value added when he doesn't have to.

Jake has consistently shown an opinion that anything that makes life easier or more streamlined is purely "lazy." He even called shopping trolleys that you take with you to the grocery store lazy at one point. Because why make your life easier when you can just lug the bags by hand?

Streamlining obviously offers more time to focus on the things that actually require it instead of mindless tasks like picking one random item up at a store. But for some people that will only ever be viewed as "lazy" even though that has nothing to do with it.

Online taestell

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5523
  • 부자태
    • UrbanCincy
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #259 on: June 19, 2017, 01:32:22 PM »
A few months ago I signed up for automatic delivery of cleaning supplies and toiletries from Amazon. They give you a 15% discount if you subscribe to 5 or more items, too. I live on the third floor of a building in OTR and my parking garage is about 3 blocks away. So the less I have to carry all that distance, the better. If Amazon drops all that stuff off at the ground floor of my building, I just have to carry it up two flights of stairs and get to skip carrying it down the street for 3 blocks.
Check out my photography on Flickr or Instagram | Twitter: @urbancincy & @taestell | The UrbanCincy Podcast (iTunes)

Offline GCrites80s

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6472
  • Running Free
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #260 on: June 19, 2017, 01:34:53 PM »
Similarly, Kroger's gradual evolution from neighborhood stores to "supermarkets" has served no public good either.  People might save $100 annually on their groceries thanks to the greater scale, but they now must drive further to do something that people historically walked to, so there is no way they're coming out ahead. 

BTW, I have heard some rumblings that Kroger is disappointed by the performance of their new giant Marketplace store in Oakley. This might be the first sign (to Kroger) that their strategy of closing down all the neighborhood stores and consolidating them into mega big box stores isn't going to work every time. They should've learned this lesson after the opened the giant Newport store and then found out that the tiny Bellevue store kept doing well...because not everybody wants to do their grocery stopping in a mega store.


Much like my rant a few pages back about Kroger forcing the local pharmacy out and making the local small market go vice-only.

Online Gramarye

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 5061
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #261 on: June 19, 2017, 01:46:08 PM »
Similarly, Kroger's gradual evolution from neighborhood stores to "supermarkets" has served no public good either.  People might save $100 annually on their groceries thanks to the greater scale, but they now must drive further to do something that people historically walked to, so there is no way they're coming out ahead. 

BTW, I have heard some rumblings that Kroger is disappointed by the performance of their new giant Marketplace store in Oakley. This might be the first sign (to Kroger) that their strategy of closing down all the neighborhood stores and consolidating them into mega big box stores isn't going to work every time. They should've learned this lesson after the opened the giant Newport store and then found out that the tiny Bellevue store kept doing well...because not everybody wants to do their grocery stopping in a mega store.

That's interesting.  I assume this is something of an analogue to the Giant Eagle Market District stores that have been opening here and there in northeast Ohio?  We had one come into the new Portage Crossing complex here in Akron not long ago, and I admit I was curious as to how it would do.  I've obviously read many articles (linked from this site's message boards as well as elsewhere) about the glut of retail space overall in this country and was kind of surprised that Portage Crossing as a whole got the green light in Cuyahoga Falls.  That said, the Giant Eagle Market District here does generally seem to have a goodly number of cars in the parking lot when I go, and I'll admit that I've gone there quite a few times myself.  That said, I'd never generalize my own experience to that of an entire city's, and I'm kind of curious now as to how it is doing relative to the expectations set for it--it gets a good amount of traffic, of course, but with the amount one of those behemoths has to cost to build, it has to get a lot of traffic just to meet expectations.

Offline BigDipper 80

  • 555'-LeVeque Tower
  • ***
  • Posts: 397
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #262 on: June 19, 2017, 01:54:53 PM »
Similarly, Kroger's gradual evolution from neighborhood stores to "supermarkets" has served no public good either.  People might save $100 annually on their groceries thanks to the greater scale, but they now must drive further to do something that people historically walked to, so there is no way they're coming out ahead. 

BTW, I have heard some rumblings that Kroger is disappointed by the performance of their new giant Marketplace store in Oakley. This might be the first sign (to Kroger) that their strategy of closing down all the neighborhood stores and consolidating them into mega big box stores isn't going to work every time. They should've learned this lesson after the opened the giant Newport store and then found out that the tiny Bellevue store kept doing well...because not everybody wants to do their grocery stopping in a mega store.

My all-time favorite Kroger (for whatever reason) is the one in Ft. Mitchell, and it's a fairly small-ish Kroger, at least compared to the monstrosities they build nowadays. Very personable staff who actually know where things are. My current go-to Kroger is a Fresh Fare in Kettering (although I still haven't figured out what makes a Fresh Fare different from a regular Kroger other than maybe having an extra aisle of organic stuff?) and it's also not a very large store. Most of the Dayton Krogers are still fairly small, although the Beavercreek Kroger is on the larger size and I think the brand new Centerville one is gigantic. Ironically there was a pretty sizeable outcry when the Centerville one opened causing the shutdown of a smaller neighborhood Kroger in Kettering, so now RTA is running a shuttle bus from the location of the old Kroger a mile and a half down the road to the new mega-Kroger, which seems absurd.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 02:05:46 PM by BigDipper 80 »

Offline jmecklenborg

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 10824
  • An Apollo Legend
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #263 on: June 19, 2017, 02:13:03 PM »
I don't know what a "shopping trolley" is so I doubt that I made a comment regarding them.  I disagree that "streamlining" makes one's life easier.  Slowing things down and doing things deliberately helps retain a sense of control. 

When visiting a grocery store, if you arrive on foot or ride a bicycle, there is a limit to what you can buy, which is a good thing.  There really isn't anything large and heavy that is healthy (2-liters, packs of Gatorade, or arguably milk).  You can't buy much more food than you can eat before it goes bad. 

Offline GCrites80s

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6472
  • Running Free
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #264 on: June 19, 2017, 02:35:02 PM »
I hate the big carts now. You almost smash into everything no matter how careful you are.

Online Gramarye

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 5061
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #265 on: June 19, 2017, 02:43:28 PM »
When visiting a grocery store, if you arrive on foot or ride a bicycle, there is a limit to what you can buy, which is a good thing.  There really isn't anything large and heavy that is healthy (2-liters, packs of Gatorade, or arguably milk).  You can't buy much more food than you can eat before it goes bad.

If I were to arrive in a 25' UHaul, there would also be a limit to what I could buy and fit in my vehicle--it would just be a larger one. :-)

Also, I'm strongly getting the sense that you're childless.  No way I can grocery shop for three humans and one dog just using my bike (especially if I didn't also supplement it with a lot of stuff I have home delivered via Amazon).  Or else that would be a lot of bike trips.

Offline jmicha

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 3641
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #266 on: June 19, 2017, 03:12:19 PM »
I don't know what a "shopping trolley" is so I doubt that I made a comment regarding them.  I disagree that "streamlining" makes one's life easier.  Slowing things down and doing things deliberately helps retain a sense of control. 

When visiting a grocery store, if you arrive on foot or ride a bicycle, there is a limit to what you can buy, which is a good thing.  There really isn't anything large and heavy that is healthy (2-liters, packs of Gatorade, or arguably milk).  You can't buy much more food than you can eat before it goes bad. 

Foldable carts you take with you to haul your groceries back. Several people here questioned your comments regarding them.

If you asked a person 150 years ago if they'd like things like carts to carry their groceries, washing machines to speed up laundry, dishwashers to do their dishes, streetcars to ride home, etc. you'd be crazy to think they'd say, "no, I'd rather slow things down and be more in control and spend my entire day doing chores." There's a lot of benefit in modern society to giving time to important tasks and not bogging one's day down with chores.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 03:18:16 PM by jmicha »

Offline subocincy

  • 629'-Rhodes State Tower
  • *****
  • Posts: 551
  • I thirst for all things Cincinnati...
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #267 on: June 19, 2017, 03:29:29 PM »
Just a little "teaser" from the Business Journal.  (Too bad it's behind a pay wall.)
http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2017/06/19/kroger-could-be-poised-for-huge-merger-analyst.html

Offline jwulsin

  • 1450'-Willis Tower
  • *********
  • Posts: 1553
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #268 on: June 19, 2017, 04:00:19 PM »
^It's important to realize for any business article, you can find "one analyst" to say just about anything... so take it with a HUGE chunk of salt. Even analysts from prestigious firms are wrong all the time.


Online taestell

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5523
  • 부자태
    • UrbanCincy
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #269 on: June 19, 2017, 04:19:03 PM »
According to the analyst quoted in the article, Kroger could acquire Dutch supermarket operator Ahold Delhaize. I have never heard of them but they apparently operate 1,500 U.S. stores along the East Coast and 6,500 stores globally.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 04:19:11 PM by taestell »
Check out my photography on Flickr or Instagram | Twitter: @urbancincy & @taestell | The UrbanCincy Podcast (iTunes)

Offline AmrapinVA

  • 771'-Terminal Tower
  • *******
  • Posts: 1193
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #270 on: June 19, 2017, 04:24:23 PM »
According to the analyst quoted in the article, Kroger could acquire Dutch supermarket operator Ahold Delhaize. I have never heard of them but they apparently operate 1,500 U.S. stores along the East Coast and 6,500 stores globally.

Ahold operates Giant stores in the DC area and Stop & Shop in the NYC metro.

Cant speak for Stop & Shop but Giant is getting it's doors blown off by the steady expansion of Harris Teeter and Wegman's in the DC metro. Don't see how the Kroger brand will fix the HT/Wegman's situation but maybe they can improve on Giant's quality which has been going steadily downhill since Ahold took over. Problem is Kroger's quality isn't that great either. Going to need to bring their "A game" into these markets or Kroger will be selling these brands in no time too.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 04:31:49 PM by AmrapinVA »

Offline ColDayMan

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 16717
  • ♪♪ An Apollo Legend! ♪♪
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #271 on: June 19, 2017, 04:51:34 PM »
According to the analyst quoted in the article, Kroger could acquire Dutch supermarket operator Ahold Delhaize. I have never heard of them but they apparently operate 1,500 U.S. stores along the East Coast and 6,500 stores globally.

Ahold operates Giant stores in the DC area and Stop & Shop in the NYC metro.

Cant speak for Stop & Shop but Giant is getting it's doors blown off by the steady expansion of Harris Teeter and Wegman's in the DC metro. Don't see how the Kroger brand will fix the HT/Wegman's situation but maybe they can improve on Giant's quality which has been going steadily downhill since Ahold took over. Problem is Kroger's quality isn't that great either. Going to need to bring their "A game" into these markets or Kroger will be selling these brands in no time too.

Just an FYI, Kroger owns Harris Teeter.
I love it when people come into a message board and immediately begin to mix it up.  I mean, Jesus, at least say hello!  Do you walk into a room full of strangers, pick a random woman, and tell her she's fat? - buildingcincinnati

Offline AmrapinVA

  • 771'-Terminal Tower
  • *******
  • Posts: 1193
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #272 on: June 19, 2017, 04:55:03 PM »
According to the analyst quoted in the article, Kroger could acquire Dutch supermarket operator Ahold Delhaize. I have never heard of them but they apparently operate 1,500 U.S. stores along the East Coast and 6,500 stores globally.

Ahold operates Giant stores in the DC area and Stop & Shop in the NYC metro.

Cant speak for Stop & Shop but Giant is getting it's doors blown off by the steady expansion of Harris Teeter and Wegman's in the DC metro. Don't see how the Kroger brand will fix the HT/Wegman's situation but maybe they can improve on Giant's quality which has been going steadily downhill since Ahold took over. Problem is Kroger's quality isn't that great either. Going to need to bring their "A game" into these markets or Kroger will be selling these brands in no time too.

Just an FYI, Kroger owns Harris Teeter.

Wow, I really didn't know that, I don't shop at Harris Teeter. Now the purchase makes more sense to me because Harris Teeter is all over DC. Will definitely solidify their market share if Giant becomes Kroger. Hopefully they won't close some stores where there could be an overlap but with Wegman's rapid expansion in the DC metro it will probably not matter anyway.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 04:59:54 PM by AmrapinVA »

Offline jmecklenborg

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 10824
  • An Apollo Legend
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #273 on: June 19, 2017, 06:26:53 PM »

Foldable carts you take with you to haul your groceries back. Several people here questioned your comments regarding them.

If you asked a person 150 years ago if they'd like things like carts to carry their groceries, washing machines to speed up laundry, dishwashers to do their dishes, streetcars to ride home, etc. you'd be crazy to think they'd say, "no, I'd rather slow things down and be more in control and spend my entire day doing chores." There's a lot of benefit in modern society to giving time to important tasks and not bogging one's day down with chores.

Well I still have no recollection regarding those little carts.  I didn't know they had a name until just now so again I doubt that I said anything about them. 

I overheard someone at work bragging about how they only paid 99 cents per gallon this past weekend for gas at Kroger.  I ignored the conversation but couldn't help but think how Kroger is fooling people just like credit card points systems.  People who proudly crow that they "pay off their credit cards every month" refuse to acknowledge that use of a credit card encourages more spending.  Everything about "saving" money in grocery stores and big box retail is all about getting you to spend more. 

Offline subocincy

  • 629'-Rhodes State Tower
  • *****
  • Posts: 551
  • I thirst for all things Cincinnati...
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #274 on: June 19, 2017, 07:28:46 PM »
According to the analyst quoted in the article, Kroger could acquire Dutch supermarket operator Ahold Delhaize. I have never heard of them but they apparently operate 1,500 U.S. stores along the East Coast and 6,500 stores globally.
Unhappily to say, this source suggests just the opposite...
https://seekingalpha.com/news/3274235-kroger-seen-takeover-target

Online David

  • Premium Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7045
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #275 on: June 19, 2017, 11:29:42 PM »
When visiting a grocery store, if you arrive on foot or ride a bicycle, there is a limit to what you can buy, which is a good thing.  There really isn't anything large and heavy that is healthy (2-liters, packs of Gatorade, or arguably milk).  You can't buy much more food than you can eat before it goes bad.

If I were to arrive in a 25' UHaul, there would also be a limit to what I could buy and fit in my vehicle--it would just be a larger one. :-)

Also, I'm strongly getting the sense that you're childless.  No way I can grocery shop for three humans and one dog just using my bike (especially if I didn't also supplement it with a lot of stuff I have home delivered via Amazon).  Or else that would be a lot of bike trips.

I definitely see your point but it is scary how people don't get out of the house and shop much anymore.

Even though you're shopping for 3 people and a dog, it seems like you'd do just fine walking to the neighborhood stores and back, if you shopped every day or every other day. It'd probably be 30-40 minutes of your time each trip probably every other day. Not a big deal, honestly, Imo. You'd get good exercise in the process. If you have a family, you could bring someone along with you to make the trip somewhat easier.

Amazon promotes Schizoid culture, something I've contended for the past 11 years, is a huge problem in America. It has been, for decades. There's well-regarded sociologists who would agree with me. I'm not just talking about going out and buying groceries but just buying things in general. It's healthy to get out of the house and move around, walk, lift stuff every now and then. It's also healthy to interact and form friendships with people who work at neighborhood retail stores. Everyone opposing JMeck's argument are being realists; where we're headed is definitely more efficient and allows us to spend more time focusing on non-menial tasks (but honestly, I doubt people are actually putting that free time towards something particularly productive.) At the same time, it is important that we as humans, check ourselves from time to time, and we certainly do! Ever see the movie Wall-E? It's sadly, entirely antiquated at this point, but Blockbuster is a good example of what I'm talking about. I LOVED going into my neighborhood Blockbuster (In 2010!) and talking to the associates that I knew very well, on a first-name basis, about the movie I rented. I'd always consult them for advice on what I should rent and always had a fun conversation with them about the movie I was returning. Having real life experiences outside of the house and outside of work, like going to stores is a good way to stimulate the brain instead of just staying in the house and simply shopping online; i.e. having too much time in your life spent in front of LED pixels and digital sound waves. Ultimately, spending too much time handling business online makes for a pretty lonely and boring existence. Don't get me wrong; I love the internet and it's certainly done much more good than harm but I do believe that the internet's role in the world should be limited. JMeck isn't talking about market cap, he's talking about whether or not companies are actually good for the consumer and our culture. You're defending corporations while he's defending humanity.

Heh. When I lived in a big apartment building in Shaker Square, I'd go to the mailbox room and see Amazon packages all over the place, every day. Amazon boxes have a distinctive look/logo. It made me wonder how often they get stolen; if it's from Amazon, it's likely that there's something good and somewhat valuable in there or at least it's perceived as such.

Modern architects recognize 300 masterpieces but ignore the other 30 million buildings that have ruined the world. - Andres Duany

Offline GCrites80s

  • 2717'-Burj Khalifa
  • **********
  • Posts: 6472
  • Running Free
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #276 on: June 19, 2017, 11:57:00 PM »
Yeah, Schizoid culture or as I call it , spastic. People are very spastic today, not mellow or soothing like people from the '70s and '80s. It started with '90s ATTITUDE and snowballed from there. The Internet turbocharged it.

Offline joshknut

  • 468'-Scripps Center
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #277 on: June 20, 2017, 07:53:12 AM »
I live in an apartment with my wife, my child, and currently my mother in law visiting from eastern europe. We mostly use Findlay as our source of groceries and typically do not take a car. We will normally streetcar or red bike. It's easy enough to just load up our canvas bags and cart everything home on our shoulders/hands. It works out just fine and we don't have to stress out driving/parking. Various cleaning supplies, etc can be bought at Wood's Hardware or one of the Walgreens. Now with EMC in place, a lot more can be bought up at Findlay. Once the new Kroger goes in, it'll be a great place to get specialty/name brand stuff and I still won't use a car to shop there.

Offline IAGuy39

  • 771'-Terminal Tower
  • *******
  • Posts: 1002
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #278 on: June 20, 2017, 08:47:20 AM »
^^ I was talking to my grandpa the last time I spent some time with him, he is 80 now, and we were in Mason City, IA and talking about how it used to be there in the late 50's or early 60's.

We were at a prominent old corner in the downtown area that had been mostly all torn down.  That leads into another downtown area which was cleared for a mall sometime in the 70's.  He was saying that he loved how it was before, where there were grocers on many corners and most everyone in the whole city could simply walk or ride their bike to the grocery.  He said he liked that so much better than what it turned into.  He said it was nice to go everyday to the store and just get what you need, talk to your neighbors, to the store manager or the workers there.  It seems it would be much more refreshing than now, where going to Kroger can be stressful with all the parking and traffic, and congestion in the store, it's like a rat race...

Offline joshknut

  • 468'-Scripps Center
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
Re: Cincinnati: Kroger
« Reply #279 on: June 20, 2017, 08:54:48 AM »
That's exactly what I love about getting my groceries at Findlay. It's more personal and much less stressful. Any big box grocery really does feel like a rat race.

Remove Ads