Author Topic: Gentrification News & Discussion  (Read 35206 times)

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Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #175 on: March 20, 2017, 03:11:39 PM »
^Blue Bottle is always a sign of hyper-gentrification in the Bay. In Oakland, they won't touch neighborhoods with a surviving middle class or a large Latino/Black population. They typically only set up shop in majority white neighborhoods where nearly everyone is a millionaire, trust fund kid, or makes at least 100k a year.

Sort of like Heinen's here on a more Cleveland scale.   That's why it was such a BFD when they opened downtown.
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Offline mrnyc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #176 on: March 20, 2017, 06:35:33 PM »
in nyc, despite all the hipstery neighborhood gentrifier coffeeshops, without question the best coffee remains the cafe con leche's made with bustelo at the bodegas.
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Online jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #177 on: March 20, 2017, 06:59:14 PM »
When did people start calling corner stores "bodegas"?  I had barely heard the word until about five years ago. 

In Cincinnati they are either a corner store or a del or a pony keg.  A corner store generally refers to a corner store that is actually on a corner and if it has parking is in a vacant lot to one side.  A del or a pony keg usually has a bootleg pre-zoning strip of parking in front that can't be built today, although a pony keg probably stocks more beer and is open later.  Sometimes a pony keg is also a drive-thru, but a place that is explicitly called a drive-thru usually doesn't have a store you can walk into. 

Online taestell

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #178 on: March 20, 2017, 07:30:48 PM »
^The various black churches (and there are dozens and dozens of them) are going to benefit the most financially when Cincinnati neighborhoods gentrify.  Many of them own a dozen or more random properties.

Last year I was walking around taking pictures in OTR, as I do most every warm weekend. I took a picture of the church on Sycamore next to Nichola's. The pastor came running out and asked me, "Are you with 3CDC? I want to sell this church!" So despite the narrative among a number of young white liberals that 3CDC is an evil gentrifier, many of the people that have actually been in the neighborhood for decades are welcoming what 3CDC is doing.
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Offline mrnyc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #179 on: March 21, 2017, 06:48:20 AM »
When did people start calling corner stores "bodegas"?  I had barely heard the word until about five years ago. 


thats because you are in sw ohio. bodegas started when latinos from the islands moved to the states. we have them in lorain and cleveland too. bodegas have staples, quick grab stuff like sodas/beer, sandwiches and brain frying coffee always made with bustelo and steamed milk. and a cat. always a cat. don gato watches over the place.
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Offline AmrapinVA

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #180 on: March 21, 2017, 11:15:06 AM »
The problem with bodegas is the term is being used for every corner store in a gentrified area. I think that's what jmecklenborg is talking about. In DC, the white trust-fund kids are calling corner stores run by Koreans "bodegas" when they're clearly just corner stores. They don't even know what the word means.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 11:19:24 AM by AmrapinVA »

Online GCrites80s

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #181 on: March 21, 2017, 11:47:35 AM »
It's because of Half Baked


Online jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #182 on: March 21, 2017, 11:49:07 AM »
Yeah I remember seeing a "bodega cats" blog post or something about 4~ years ago.  It was obviously written by someone who had just started using the word. 

I remember when I was in college that many people were completely fascinated by Laundromats (UO is auto-capitalizing?) because most had grown up in homes with washers and dryers.  Since all these gentrifiers are renting apartments with in-unit washers and dryers, I sense that the corner store is the flashpoint where these suburban kids get to mingle with the ethnics. 

Offline thebillshark

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #183 on: March 21, 2017, 11:51:49 AM »
You guys are thinking way too hard about this.

Online taestell

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #184 on: March 21, 2017, 02:13:04 PM »
Laundromats (UO is auto-capitalizing?)

Because Laundromat is a trademark that later became generalized, much like Kleenex or Xerox.
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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #185 on: March 21, 2017, 02:39:36 PM »
Laundr-O-Mat

Offline Dougal

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #186 on: March 25, 2017, 12:02:25 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b




Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #187 on: March 25, 2017, 10:03:37 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b


Behind a paywall.
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Offline X

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #188 on: March 25, 2017, 10:14:28 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Offline thebillshark

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #189 on: March 25, 2017, 11:03:26 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Right, especially since the loosest definition of "gentrification" is someone moving in that makes more than the neighborhood median income, it really is this simple.

What's also perplexing is that (in the Midwest in particular) some of the same neighborhoods that anti-gentrification activists would seek to have frozen in time were themselves formed by segregationalist policies such as redlining and followed up by decades of systematic disinvestment. Not exactly policies they would agree with I would think.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2017, 11:17:50 AM by thebillshark »

Offline Dougal

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #190 on: March 25, 2017, 11:08:51 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b


Behind a paywall.

Oh, sorry. I subscribe to the FT, but I thought this article was free.  I'll look for another source.

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #191 on: March 25, 2017, 11:09:22 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

One of the main reasons I moved to Short Vine was because of Top Cat's and Sudsy's. Both closed within a year. That's how I learned not to move to a place just because I like a few businesses in the area.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #192 on: March 25, 2017, 01:00:12 PM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Right, especially since the loosest definition of "gentrification" is someone moving in that makes more than the neighborhood median income, it really is this simple.

What's also perplexing is that (in the Midwest in particular) some of the same neighborhoods that anti-gentrification activists would seek to have frozen in time were themselves formed by segregationalist policies such as redlining and followed up by decades of systematic disinvestment. Not exactly policies they would agree with I would think.

The practical definition seems to be when people start to move into a deteriorating area that's character, such that is is, is dominated by poverty and the associated mndsets.

I don't think the G word was used when students and art galleries began moving into Little Italy, was that because those things never really happened there?
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Online TBideon

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #193 on: March 25, 2017, 01:59:48 PM »
Face it, there is no true consensus on what gentrification is. You see a developer in a low income/high crime neighborhood looking to put in housing and all hell breaks loose with the residents. Maybe they feel empowered with the false narrative of gentrification, when in fact there isn't any. No one is going to be pushed out due to property tax increases anytime soon. No Whole Foods will replace the local corner store. And yet they act like tomorrow is moving day.

Complaints of disinvestment followed by panic of potential investment followed by rehashed complaints of empty stores. True gentrification  (with its consequences) as seen in Manhattan and San Fran are a drop in the bucket. Gentrification is such a misplaced concern in most cases.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2017, 02:01:49 PM by TBideon »

Offline neilworms

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #194 on: March 27, 2017, 01:31:10 AM »
Quote
OMG that's cheap!!! For a beautiful neighborhood so close to downtown, that's insanity. Even Toledo has some apartments more expensive than that. But to be fair, there are early signs of first wave gentrification in Detroit and Toledo now. Because of how bad things got in those two cities during the recession (highest percentage of job losses in America), a lot of big time projects were delayed (like Fiberglas Tower in Toledo). Now there is a mad real estate rush in Detroit/Toledo, and some first wave renters are being forced out. Pittsburgh has been dealing with this for even longer since its economy crashed hard earlier (70s/80s), but also leveled off earlier (early to mid-2000s).

Its near-loop (but not like the hottest areas near the loop) Chicago level prices.  Cincinnatians are only freaking out because the previous mayor did changed the way things were done and actually made the city advance after a very long run of being managed by really terrible leadership which generated an increadible complacency in mediocrity and lack of change, even positive change is shunned as negative.  You want a good idea of how Cincinnati works, look at the bullshit surrounding the Dennison.  These anti-gentrification types in Cincinnati are just as conservative as the suburbanites who comment on the enquirer, they want to maintain the old/broken way of doing things in Cincinnati because positive change is scary.   Gentrification narratives from the coasts are convenient scapegoats for them to mask that parochial conservatism and appear to be more progressive than they actually are.

Chicago hasn't gotten a blue bottle yet.  Coastal elites want to go to europe or asia before going to Chicago :/.  (Even though in a lot of ways the North/near loop areas of Chicago is more like them than the rest of the midwest).  Chicagoans still have a chip on their shoulder due to this too, though I usually get furious with natives and tell them they have way more trendy cultural stuff (movies, concerts, trendy international food chains) than the rest of the midwest ever gets and to quit whining. ;)

At the last MPMF that was worth going to (old Cincinnati found a way to ruin that too - I guess this is why I've been pretty dour on Cincy lately, the old ways are creeping back in after a very off script burst of new awesomeness, if Yvette looses the election then Mallory may have just been an odd but good blip.) I randomly met a guy who was a cincy native, who then lived in the Bay, got priced out, went to Chicago, had kids reach high school age (where school gets a lot more difficult in Chicago to pull off) then move to OTR.  He worked at Salesforce making a Bay area salary.  He could easily afford to send his kids to private school and live like a king in Cincy.  Only folks who know about Cincinnati are natives (or oddball Daytonians like myself though the two cities are joined pretty much), not even Chicago knows about how much of a gem OTR is because Cincinnatians are terribly bashful people, Chicagoans look down on most other midwest cities, and the Coasts don't give a darn / are scared of the middle of the country even Chicago. (re-blue bottle)

Btw my biggest pet peeve with coastal stereotypes of Chicago is that its somehow quintessentially Midwestern - in spite of the much better developed transit system, generally more progressive politics and way greater diversity.  Its an outlier in many many respects with only Minneapolis being similar in those ways (though per-capita its more prosperous and its transit is good but not as good as Chicagos).
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 02:01:16 AM by neilworms »

Offline neilworms

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #195 on: March 27, 2017, 01:37:17 AM »
SW Ohio is missing out on so much latino culture its not even funny. First time I heard bodega used was by a guy I knew who worked in LA for many years then moved back to Cincy (when I was in college) due to sustaining injuries that made him less able to work.

When did people start calling corner stores "bodegas"?  I had barely heard the word until about five years ago. 


thats because you are in sw ohio. bodegas started when latinos from the islands moved to the states. we have them in lorain and cleveland too. bodegas have staples, quick grab stuff like sodas/beer, sandwiches and brain frying coffee always made with bustelo and steamed milk. and a cat. always a cat. don gato watches over the place.

My favorite bodegas are the ones (though I think this is strictly a Chicago thing) where they also cook food on site in the store.  Most of the affluent north side doesn't have easy access to these but they are pretty awesome for great cheap greasy food along with toiletries and bread/tortillas and milk.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 02:03:56 AM by neilworms »

Online jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #196 on: March 27, 2017, 02:40:28 AM »
Face it, there is no true consensus on what gentrification is. You see a developer in a low income/high crime neighborhood looking to put in housing and all hell breaks loose with the residents. Maybe they feel empowered with the false narrative of gentrification, when in fact there isn't any. No one is going to be pushed out due to property tax increases anytime soon. No Whole Foods will replace the local corner store. And yet they act like tomorrow is moving day.

Complaints of disinvestment followed by panic of potential investment followed by rehashed complaints of empty stores. True gentrification  (with its consequences) as seen in Manhattan and San Fran are a drop in the bucket. Gentrification is such a misplaced concern in most cases.

Nobody cared when the yupsters and rich divorcees booted the hillbillies and Italians from Northside and Mt. Adams, respectively.  "Gentrification" is only when a conspicuously white upper class displaces a conspicuously not-white underclass. 



Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #197 on: March 27, 2017, 07:42:54 AM »
Face it, there is no true consensus on what gentrification is. You see a developer in a low income/high crime neighborhood looking to put in housing and all hell breaks loose with the residents. Maybe they feel empowered with the false narrative of gentrification, when in fact there isn't any. No one is going to be pushed out due to property tax increases anytime soon. No Whole Foods will replace the local corner store. And yet they act like tomorrow is moving day.

Complaints of disinvestment followed by panic of potential investment followed by rehashed complaints of empty stores. True gentrification  (with its consequences) as seen in Manhattan and San Fran are a drop in the bucket. Gentrification is such a misplaced concern in most cases.

Nobody cared when the yupsters and rich divorcees booted the hillbillies and Italians from Northside and Mt. Adams, respectively.  "Gentrification" is only when a conspicuously white upper class displaces a conspicuously not-white underclass. 

I chose not to say that because I thought it could take over the tone of the conversation, but there's that as well.
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Offline Dougal

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #198 on: March 27, 2017, 12:38:12 PM »
I chose not to say that because I thought it could take over the tone of the conversation, but there's that as well.

Reverse blockbusting.  It was briefly an issue in Wash DC but care was taken (and information widely disseminated) to make sure people weren't victimized by developers. The old residents quickly became attuned to fair prices. There was some lingering resentment, but that's life.

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #199 on: March 27, 2017, 01:15:07 PM »
I remember seeing a study linked on here where gentrification was defined as areas turning white. If a bunch of poor white people take over a middle class black neighborhood and park a bunch of rusty Novas in the yards that is NOT gentrification.

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #200 on: March 27, 2017, 02:44:01 PM »
Well, when rich white people kick out middle class white people, it's called a tear-down.  People express mild bewilderment but generally move on with their lives.  What's weird is that tear-downs can occur because an area has had great schools and a great reputation for decades OR it can happen in a poor area with small homes that aren't worth rehabbing.  In the former situation it's just tear-downs -- in the later it's "gentrification".   

Offline neilworms

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #201 on: March 27, 2017, 03:46:31 PM »
Well, when rich white people kick out middle class white people, it's called a tear-down.  People express mild bewilderment but generally move on with their lives.  What's weird is that tear-downs can occur because an area has had great schools and a great reputation for decades OR it can happen in a poor area with small homes that aren't worth rehabbing.  In the former situation it's just tear-downs -- in the later it's "gentrification".   

Its not always a tear down (SF for instance doesn't really allow those to happen so older buildings are constantly renovated with higher and higher end features), though tear downs are a lot more common when richer people move in (though their are exceptions like mid-century north side Chicago suburbs where people don't like the ranch houses and replace them with McMansions).
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 03:47:21 PM by neilworms »

Offline eastvillagedon

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #202 on: March 27, 2017, 04:12:17 PM »
ha ha the first comment on this is from San Francisco


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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #203 on: March 27, 2017, 04:33:58 PM »
In the Bay, it's not typically called gentrification until 1% white people kick out upper middle class white people. Hence why only recently have people been freaking out about Oakland's gentrification crisis (due to decades of protesting hushing construction and the extreme NIMBY politics of Oakland-Berkeley). You barely heard a peep from national/global media when upper middle class white folks were first flooding Oakland hoods like Temescal, Rockridge, Adams Point, Uptown, Eastlake, etc. Now that those original upper middle class white folks are being displaced by millionaires, it's considered a crisis. Very little attention is ever paid to the African-American history of Oakland neighborhoods. There is certainly a double standard based on race in Oakland. When blacks folks and businesses originally got evicted, big media hardly paid notice. Now there is a deluge of gentrification articles about Oakland focusing on majority white neighborhoods. What's really crazy is that they still don't call it "gentrification" in East Oakland despite the plethora of middle class people being evicted right now. When tiny 1000-square-foot teardowns are going for over $500,000 and evictions are through the roof, that's gentrification whether people want to admit it or not. It doesn't matter how violent the neighborhood in East Oakland still is, when renters making median income are thrown to the streets, housing prices triple, and displacement is at all-time highs, it's gentrification.

The Mission's situation is called hyper-gentrification because there have been so many consecutive waves of wealthier and wealthier people kicking out existing residents. But really everything in SF is hyper-gentrification at this point. All SF neighborhoods are on their second to fourth wave of gentrification. Even Bayview and the Tenderloin recently entered their second wave.

*Oakland has just a handful of hoods where there is actual first wave gentrification (in deep East Oakland). Anything east of the old Raiders stadium is experiencing its first wave of real gentrification. Until recently, there were not significant eviction pressures around Coliseum station. That is still Oakland's most violent area, but the big money is moving in now.

**That horrendous location in deep East Oakland is a big part of the reason the Raiders wanted to leave. They had no chance in hell of ever getting approved to move to a better neighborhood, so Vegas makes more sense. If the Raiders could have built a stadium in Jack London Square on a vacant waterfront lot, they would have likely stayed in Oakland. All of Oakland's stadium proposals kept them in the ghetto, which is bad for business. The A's always got treated better by Oakland (better location options), but they will likely leave too. Portland makes the most sense for the A's since there is not even a Triple-A baseball team up there (and San Jose looks increasingly impossible). Oakland will likely be America's first city to lose all of its pro sports teams. The location of the sports stadia in deep East Oakland was a strong motivation for all of these teams to leave.

So in a weird way, Oakland's pro sports teams were gentrified out of the city. The only safe, viable lots for sports stadiums were in neighborhoods far too expensive to have sports stadiums. Deep East Oakland always caused problems with attendance when teams weren't red hot. But it is Oakland's cheapest land...
« Last Edit: April 14, 2017, 02:56:20 PM by C-Dawg »

Online jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #204 on: March 27, 2017, 05:35:50 PM »
There is an overuse of the term gentrification and an underuse of the term housing crisis.  Intense gentrification on its own can lead to a citywide housing crisis, of course, but there are usually demographic and economic issues at play which get confused in the emotional swells surrounding gentrification. 

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #205 on: March 27, 2017, 10:44:20 PM »
There's a tear-down happening down the street from me. Upscale areas such as Upper Arlington and Bexley have seen teardowns for decades (I bet Hyde Park has had a few too) but in Groveport? It just goes to show how people want to live in the Old Town since the subdivision and ribbon development parts of Groveport are definitely not seeing tear-downs.

Also, Groveport has "terrible schools" but I turned out fine. I only went to them for three years though. Going to "terrible schools" meant interacting with black people then later going to an all-white school that had tons of poor kids (but had a reputation as a "better school") meant learning that it's extremely distracting poverty rather than race that makes for "terrible schools". It's such BS, those trailer park kids in the next district over's "better schools" were even more distracting. In Groveport we were able to "hide money" by having an unassuming suburban house but moving to our family's giant farm in Ashville ruined that.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 10:56:11 PM by GCrites80s »

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #206 on: March 27, 2017, 11:03:12 PM »
Also, a lot of outsiders can't handle the notion of others sending their kids to schools that have a mix of income levels.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #207 on: March 28, 2017, 08:41:43 AM »
There's a tear-down happening down the street from me. Upscale areas such as Upper Arlington and Bexley have seen teardowns for decades (I bet Hyde Park has had a few too) but in Groveport? It just goes to show how people want to live in the Old Town since the subdivision and ribbon development parts of Groveport are definitely not seeing tear-downs.

Also, Groveport has "terrible schools" but I turned out fine. I only went to them for three years though. Going to "terrible schools" meant interacting with black people then later going to an all-white school that had tons of poor kids (but had a reputation as a "better school") meant learning that it's extremely distracting poverty rather than race that makes for "terrible schools". It's such BS, those trailer park kids in the next district over's "better schools" were even more distracting. In Groveport we were able to "hide money" by having an unassuming suburban house but moving to our family's giant farm in Ashville ruined that.

Correlation is not causation.  Could indifference to (and even antipathy for) education lead to the poverty and the terrible schools?
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Offline neilworms

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #208 on: March 28, 2017, 02:35:04 PM »
Quote
There's a tear-down happening down the street from me. Upscale areas such as Upper Arlington and Bexley have seen teardowns for decades (I bet Hyde Park has had a few too) but in Groveport? It just goes to show how people want to live in the Old Town since the subdivision and ribbon development parts of Groveport are definitely not seeing tear-downs.

Yeah I think your right about the old school elite areas (and nearby) of Cincinnati having teardowns, though when I'm in town I don't notice as many proportionally as I have in Chicagoland's comparable areas.  Columbia Tusculum is probably the neighborhood that has the worst infill vs what was orginally there, I still can't believe the community/council allowed a crummy mcmansion to be built right next to where its well known (by cincy standards) painted lady row is on Tusculum...

Btw 2 apartments ago for me was a teardown - it was in Wicker Park, which is probably 3rd wave gentrification right now, its starting to feel a lot like Lincoln Park these days.  It kind of sucked because it was the nicest workers cottage on the block, built right in 1900 with a few extra details on it.   It was replaced by a large mansion, which looks great as far as modern infill goes but I'm still sad the old building is gone. (though I am happy for the landlord who was a really nice guy who deserved a good retirement I'm sure he cashed out big).
« Last Edit: March 28, 2017, 02:38:11 PM by neilworms »

Offline Eighth and State

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #209 on: March 28, 2017, 02:53:36 PM »

Here's a good example of teardowns in Montgomery, Ohio. About half of the 1950's ranches on this suburban street, which were all in good condition, have been replaced with larger McMansions.

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2387925,-84.3615799,3a,75y,121.17h,71.66t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1ssjfsZFVm-k2hnpDuj87NYQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

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