Author Topic: Gentrification News & Discussion  (Read 24167 times)

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Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #175 on: March 20, 2017, 03:11:39 PM »
^Blue Bottle is always a sign of hyper-gentrification in the Bay. In Oakland, they won't touch neighborhoods with a surviving middle class or a large Latino/Black population. They typically only set up shop in majority white neighborhoods where nearly everyone is a millionaire, trust fund kid, or makes at least 100k a year.

Sort of like Heinen's here on a more Cleveland scale.   That's why it was such a BFD when they opened downtown.
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Offline mrnyc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #176 on: March 20, 2017, 06:35:33 PM »
in nyc, despite all the hipstery neighborhood gentrifier coffeeshops, without question the best coffee remains the cafe con leche's made with bustelo at the bodegas.
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Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #177 on: March 20, 2017, 06:59:14 PM »
When did people start calling corner stores "bodegas"?  I had barely heard the word until about five years ago. 

In Cincinnati they are either a corner store or a del or a pony keg.  A corner store generally refers to a corner store that is actually on a corner and if it has parking is in a vacant lot to one side.  A del or a pony keg usually has a bootleg pre-zoning strip of parking in front that can't be built today, although a pony keg probably stocks more beer and is open later.  Sometimes a pony keg is also a drive-thru, but a place that is explicitly called a drive-thru usually doesn't have a store you can walk into. 

Offline taestell

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #178 on: March 20, 2017, 07:30:48 PM »
^The various black churches (and there are dozens and dozens of them) are going to benefit the most financially when Cincinnati neighborhoods gentrify.  Many of them own a dozen or more random properties.

Last year I was walking around taking pictures in OTR, as I do most every warm weekend. I took a picture of the church on Sycamore next to Nichola's. The pastor came running out and asked me, "Are you with 3CDC? I want to sell this church!" So despite the narrative among a number of young white liberals that 3CDC is an evil gentrifier, many of the people that have actually been in the neighborhood for decades are welcoming what 3CDC is doing.
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Offline mrnyc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #179 on: March 21, 2017, 06:48:20 AM »
When did people start calling corner stores "bodegas"?  I had barely heard the word until about five years ago. 


thats because you are in sw ohio. bodegas started when latinos from the islands moved to the states. we have them in lorain and cleveland too. bodegas have staples, quick grab stuff like sodas/beer, sandwiches and brain frying coffee always made with bustelo and steamed milk. and a cat. always a cat. don gato watches over the place.
"That whole rural thing. It's a joke." Ed Koch

Offline AmrapinVA

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #180 on: March 21, 2017, 11:15:06 AM »
The problem with bodegas is the term is being used for every corner store in a gentrified area. I think that's what jmecklenborg is talking about. In DC, the white trust-fund kids are calling corner stores run by Koreans "bodegas" when they're clearly just corner stores. They don't even know what the word means.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 11:19:24 AM by AmrapinVA »

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #181 on: March 21, 2017, 11:47:35 AM »
It's because of Half Baked


Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #182 on: March 21, 2017, 11:49:07 AM »
Yeah I remember seeing a "bodega cats" blog post or something about 4~ years ago.  It was obviously written by someone who had just started using the word. 

I remember when I was in college that many people were completely fascinated by Laundromats (UO is auto-capitalizing?) because most had grown up in homes with washers and dryers.  Since all these gentrifiers are renting apartments with in-unit washers and dryers, I sense that the corner store is the flashpoint where these suburban kids get to mingle with the ethnics. 

Offline thebillshark

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #183 on: March 21, 2017, 11:51:49 AM »
You guys are thinking way too hard about this.

Offline taestell

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #184 on: March 21, 2017, 02:13:04 PM »
Laundromats (UO is auto-capitalizing?)

Because Laundromat is a trademark that later became generalized, much like Kleenex or Xerox.
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Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #185 on: March 21, 2017, 02:39:36 PM »
Laundr-O-Mat

Offline Dougal

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #186 on: Yesterday at 12:02:25 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b




Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #187 on: Yesterday at 10:03:37 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b


Behind a paywall.
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Offline X

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #188 on: Yesterday at 10:14:28 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Offline thebillshark

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #189 on: Yesterday at 11:03:26 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Right, especially since the loosest definition of "gentrification" is someone moving in that makes more than the neighborhood median income, it really is this simple.

What's also perplexing is that (in the Midwest in particular) some of the same neighborhoods that anti-gentrification activists would seek to have frozen in time were themselves formed by segregationalist policies such as redlining and followed up by decades of systematic disinvestment. Not exactly policies they would agree with I would think.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 11:17:50 AM by thebillshark »

Offline Dougal

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #190 on: Yesterday at 11:08:51 AM »
One British view in favor of gentrification; he makes his point well.

https://www.ft.com/content/7d2e909e-0a32-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b


Behind a paywall.

Oh, sorry. I subscribe to the FT, but I thought this article was free.  I'll look for another source.

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #191 on: Yesterday at 11:09:22 AM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

One of the main reasons I moved to Short Vine was because of Top Cat's and Sudsy's. Both closed within a year. That's how I learned not to move to a place just because I like a few businesses in the area.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #192 on: Yesterday at 01:00:12 PM »
I don't know what his argument was for gentrification, but here's mine, and I think it's pretty ironclad:  physics tells us that entropy rules all: neighborhoods are always changing, buildings and people age, businesses go out of business, and infrastructure deteriorates.  The only way to fight entropy is with a constant infusion of new energy. In the urban context, this means new people, businesses, buildings, and yes, all of that means money.  If a neighborhood isn't attracting all those things, then it is by definition decaying and slowly dying.  Unless you believe that the only valid lifecycle for a neighborhood is to be built and then endure a long, slow decline to nothing then gentrification is a necessary part of that lifecycle.

Right, especially since the loosest definition of "gentrification" is someone moving in that makes more than the neighborhood median income, it really is this simple.

What's also perplexing is that (in the Midwest in particular) some of the same neighborhoods that anti-gentrification activists would seek to have frozen in time were themselves formed by segregationalist policies such as redlining and followed up by decades of systematic disinvestment. Not exactly policies they would agree with I would think.

The practical definition seems to be when people start to move into a deteriorating area that's character, such that is is, is dominated by poverty and the associated mndsets.

I don't think the G word was used when students and art galleries began moving into Little Italy, was that because those things never really happened there?
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Offline TBideon

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Re: Gentrification News & Discussion
« Reply #193 on: Yesterday at 01:59:48 PM »
Face it, there is no true consensus on what gentrification is. You see a developer in a low income/high crime neighborhood looking to put in housing and all hell breaks loose with the residents. Maybe they feel empowered with the false narrative of gentrification, when in fact there isn't any. No one is going to be pushed out due to property tax increases anytime soon. No Whole Foods will replace the local corner store. And yet they act like tomorrow is moving day.

Complaints of disinvestment followed by panic of potential investment followed by rehashed complaints of empty stores. True gentrification  (with its consequences) as seen in Manhattan and San Fran are a drop in the bucket. Gentrification is such a misplaced concern in most cases.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 02:01:49 PM by TBideon »

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