Author Topic: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles  (Read 18392 times)

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Offline clvlndr

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #70 on: November 30, 2015, 02:07:03 PM »
It makes me insane the way they compare cities to one another, yet do not actually compare them apples to apples. CBRE is being quite liberal in what they call downtown in some of those cities. Milwaukee has around 7-10,000 people living downtown yet they say 31,000? There was growth of 20,000 people downtown in 5 years? I have a hard time believing that. Cinci at 15,000? Kansas City at 20,000? Indianapolis at 27,000? If you're gonna do three square miles in some of them, do it in all of them or just compare actual downtown to actual downtown.

And 35,000 in downtown Detroit!?  No way.  If your measuring populations inside the downtown district, Cleveland has one of the largest downtown populations in these listed Midwest secondary markets, but to go by these numbers, Cleveland's has the smallest. These other cities are being measured by having downtowns inclusive of considerable residential areas adjacent to, or near their downtown, while Cleveland's numbers are limited to within downtown... Yes, it would be interesting if we included Goodrich, Slavic Village, Central, Tremont, Ohio City, Clark-Fulton, Detroit-Shoreway, etc., which this study seems to be doing for other cities.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 02:30:00 PM by clvlndr »

Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #71 on: November 30, 2015, 02:57:58 PM »
It needs to be consistent or its a worthless metric.  Detroit and Cincinnati both have a lot of density near downtown, whereas in Cleveland it's a pretty bright line between skyscrapers and where everything is 1-2 stories. 
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Offline Robu

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #72 on: November 30, 2015, 03:23:51 PM »
I think the issue here is that Clevelanders consider "Downtown" to be synonymous with the city's Central Business District. But other cities refer to a small cluster of neighborhoods to be their "Downtown." Like in NYC, any neighborhood south of 14th Street is considered a part of Downtown. Similarly, Dayton considers the Oregon District a "downtown neighborhood," as Cincinnati does Over-the-Rhine. So the article's authors are not cheating, but they are using somewhat arbitrary regional definitions. Something more objective (like population within a certain radius of the geographic center of the central business district) might have made more sense for comparison purposes. But even then the definition of a CBD is fundamentally arbitrary.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 03:25:16 PM by Robu »

Offline jjames0408

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #73 on: November 30, 2015, 03:48:05 PM »
I think the issue here is that Clevelanders consider "Downtown" to be synonymous with the city's Central Business District. But other cities refer to a small cluster of neighborhoods to be their "Downtown." Like in NYC, any neighborhood south of 14th Street is considered a part of Downtown. Similarly, Dayton considers the Oregon District a "downtown neighborhood," as Cincinnati does Over-the-Rhine. So the article's authors are not cheating, but they are using somewhat arbitrary regional definitions. Something more objective (like population within a certain radius of the geographic center of the central business district) might have made more sense for comparison purposes. But even then the definition of a CBD is fundamentally arbitrary.
We're all saying pretty much the exact same thing, but downtown is downtown. If they're going to use population numbers, they need to make them the same regardless of what people in a region call downtown. The amount of census tracts needed to get to those inflated numbers is crazy. It makes it look like Milwaukee or Indianapolis are as urban as Minneapolis. It's just bad reporting/fact finding. Yes, they used CBRE's information, but they should still have a responsibility to look into the data prior to writing an article which compares cities against each other. There was a recent article comparing school districts around the country as well and it was the same sort of BS.

Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #74 on: November 30, 2015, 04:18:20 PM »
Might be a pointless pursuit anyway.  The article was discussing millennials moving back into inner cities, which doesn't require a sharp definition of what constitutes a downtown.  Millennials are moving into a variety of inner city neighborhoods.  I often find focusing on "downtown-only" population or growth to be counterproductive, as a CBD can never exist or function in isolation.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #75 on: November 30, 2015, 04:26:30 PM »
To my knowledge all of the apartments on the west bank of the Flats are considered Ohio City.   :wtf:
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 04:27:11 PM by TMH »

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #76 on: March 06, 2016, 08:01:25 AM »
In @TheEconomist, @avanagtmael argues that older industrial cities in US are becoming centers of brain-intensive mfg https://t.co/ubQLGk0Hbg
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Offline KJP

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #77 on: May 01, 2016, 09:21:22 PM »
Why has there been an exodus of black residents from West Coast liberal hubs?
By Aaron Renn
May 1, 2016 5:00 AM

The Black Lives Matter movement has brought the challenges facing black America to the fore, and introduced racially conscious quality-of-life questions into the national debate. How are black residents in America's cities faring? And how are those cities doing in meeting the aspirations of their black residents, judged especially by the ultimate barometer: whether blacks choose to move to these cities, or stay in them?

Though results vary to some extent, the broad trend is clear: West Coast progressive enclaves are either seeing an exodus of blacks or are failing to attract them. Midwestern and Northeastern urban areas are attracting blacks to the extent that they are affordable or providing middle class economic opportunities. And Southern cities are now experiencing the most significant gains....

It's not just liberal Western cities that are losing their black residents — many economically struggling Midwestern cities have the same problem. Detroit, Cleveland, Flint, and Youngstown all have declining black populations.

The greatest demographic transition is taking place in Chicago. A black population loss of 177,000 accounted for the lion's share of the city's total shrinkage during the 2000s. Another 53,000 blacks have fled the city since 2010. In fact, the entire metro Chicago area lost nearly 23,000 blacks in aggregate, the biggest decline in the United States.

But in northern cities with more robust middle-class economies, black populations are expanding. Since 2010, for example, metro Indianapolis added more than 19,000 blacks (6.9% growth), Columbus more than 25,000 (9%), and Boston nearly 40,000 (10.2%). New York's and Philadelphia's black population growth rates are low but positive, in line with slow overall regional growth.

MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-0501-renn-reverse-great-migration-20160501-story.html
« Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 09:22:10 PM by KJP »
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Offline E Rocc

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #78 on: May 02, 2016, 06:05:07 AM »
Why has there been an exodus of black residents from West Coast liberal hubs?
By Aaron Renn
May 1, 2016 5:00 AM

The Black Lives Matter movement has brought the challenges facing black America to the fore, and introduced racially conscious quality-of-life questions into the national debate. How are black residents in America's cities faring? And how are those cities doing in meeting the aspirations of their black residents, judged especially by the ultimate barometer: whether blacks choose to move to these cities, or stay in them?

Though results vary to some extent, the broad trend is clear: West Coast progressive enclaves are either seeing an exodus of blacks or are failing to attract them. Midwestern and Northeastern urban areas are attracting blacks to the extent that they are affordable or providing middle class economic opportunities. And Southern cities are now experiencing the most significant gains....

It's not just liberal Western cities that are losing their black residents — many economically struggling Midwestern cities have the same problem. Detroit, Cleveland, Flint, and Youngstown all have declining black populations.

The greatest demographic transition is taking place in Chicago. A black population loss of 177,000 accounted for the lion's share of the city's total shrinkage during the 2000s. Another 53,000 blacks have fled the city since 2010. In fact, the entire metro Chicago area lost nearly 23,000 blacks in aggregate, the biggest decline in the United States.

But in northern cities with more robust middle-class economies, black populations are expanding. Since 2010, for example, metro Indianapolis added more than 19,000 blacks (6.9% growth), Columbus more than 25,000 (9%), and Boston nearly 40,000 (10.2%). New York's and Philadelphia's black population growth rates are low but positive, in line with slow overall regional growth.

MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-0501-renn-reverse-great-migration-20160501-story.html

What are the demographics of the migrants?   Middle class?
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Offline surfohio

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #79 on: May 02, 2016, 06:44:33 AM »
Why has there been an exodus of black residents from West Coast liberal hubs?

MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-0501-renn-reverse-great-migration-20160501-story.html
These results should be troubling to progressives touting West Coast planning, economic, and energy policies as models for the nation. If wealthy cities like San Francisco and Portland — where progressives have near-total political control — can't produce positive outcomes for working-class and middle-class blacks, why should we expect their approach to succeed anywhere else?

Thought provoking article for sure. I totally get why it's important to track racial demographics. But I'm already leery of whatever race-based "solutions" some progressives are liable to suggest.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 06:44:54 AM by surfohio »

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #80 on: May 02, 2016, 07:20:18 AM »
But I'm already leery of whatever race-based "solutions" some progressives are liable to suggest.

Oh this, big time.   The “progressive” left sees the black community as monolithic, because it is in their best interests if it is.   But I suspect a large number of these migrants are attempting to separate themselves from such.  The problem with moving to the suburbs when your kids are older is their friends can and will visit, and bring some of the issues being fled with them.

It’s much like the mistake some make about Islamic immigrants to the US.  For the most part they are trying to get away from the basic culture of their home nations, not bring it with them.
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Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #81 on: May 02, 2016, 10:25:10 AM »
West coast cities are expensive because there are only a handful of metros along that entire seaboard, and money is moving to the coasts like never before.  Not surprising that the middle class can't hang.  I don't see issues of race or culture or local politics here, just economics.  Hot markets are for rich people.
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Offline X

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #82 on: May 02, 2016, 11:25:17 AM »
Why has there been an exodus of black residents from West Coast liberal hubs?

MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-0501-renn-reverse-great-migration-20160501-story.html
These results should be troubling to progressives touting West Coast planning, economic, and energy policies as models for the nation. If wealthy cities like San Francisco and Portland — where progressives have near-total political control — can't produce positive outcomes for working-class and middle-class blacks, why should we expect their approach to succeed anywhere else?

Thought provoking article for sure. I totally get why it's important to track racial demographics. But I'm already leery of whatever race-based "solutions" some progressives are liable to suggest.

Fair enough, but this article is a hit piece on "progressive planning", not an argument for it.

Offline surfohio

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #83 on: May 02, 2016, 11:44:28 AM »
Why has there been an exodus of black residents from West Coast liberal hubs?

MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-0501-renn-reverse-great-migration-20160501-story.html
These results should be troubling to progressives touting West Coast planning, economic, and energy policies as models for the nation. If wealthy cities like San Francisco and Portland — where progressives have near-total political control — can't produce positive outcomes for working-class and middle-class blacks, why should we expect their approach to succeed anywhere else?

Thought provoking article for sure. I totally get why it's important to track racial demographics. But I'm already leery of whatever race-based "solutions" some progressives are liable to suggest.

Fair enough, but this article is a hit piece on "progressive planning", not an argument for it.

Sure, I got that. I guess my question is what, if anything, should be done to prevent this migration?

Also, the article narrowly focuses on black people, when the larger issue appears simply to be how rising property values affect non-affluent people of any skin tone.

Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #84 on: May 02, 2016, 11:51:19 AM »
In the case of San Francisco, there's an enforced housing shortage.  It doesn't get much more elitist than that.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #85 on: May 02, 2016, 11:55:08 AM »
In the case of San Francisco, there's an enforced housing shortage.  It doesn't get much more elitist than that.

Are you referring to density and/or environmental restrictions?

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #86 on: June 12, 2016, 11:24:50 AM »
One Nation: Young, eager unleash Rust Belt economy
Matthew Dolan, Detroit Free Press 9:10 a.m. EDT June 12, 2016

Challenges facing many of America’s former industrial titans like Detroit, Cleveland and Pittsburgh, remain enormous. But a nascent economic rebound is being driven in part by young people.

Young people are starting to unbuckle the economic promise of Rust Belt cities.

The political and social challenges facing many of America’s former industrial powerhouses like Detroit, Cleveland, Baltimore and Pittsburgh remain enormous. But there are nascent signs of rebound, driven in part by youthful entrepreneurs brimming with new ideas.

Educated workers in their 20s and 30s are moving in or deciding to stay in part to avoid the rising cost of living, taxes and regulations in tech hubs such as New York, Boston and San Francisco. Newcomers increasingly see opportunities to create their own businesses, make their mark and tap underserved markets, thanks to lower barriers to entry.

MORE:
http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/michigan/2016/06/11/one-nation-young-eager-unleash-rust-belt-economy/85644354/
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #87 on: July 27, 2016, 09:04:49 PM »
The Case for Working in Silicon Valley and Living in the Rust Belt
A new wave of tech workers is house hunting in Middle America.
 Patrick Clark
 pat_clark
 Rebecca Greenfield
 rzgreenfield
  Bloomberg Businessweek Reprints
July 19, 2016 — 7:00 AM EDT

When software engineer Eric Anderle and his wife, Rachel, decided they were tired of renting and wanted to buy, they quickly realized that any place in their neighborhood—San Francisco’s spiffy NoPa district—would be out of reach. Rather than look in surrounding towns or across the bay to Oakland, the 25-year-olds staged an escape. Last fall they moved into a four-bedroom house an hour south of Grand Rapids, Mich. The monthly mortgage payment on their 3,000-square-foot home there is about the same as the rent on the couple’s old 600-square-foot apartment. Best of all, Anderle didn’t have to give up his sweet Silicon Valley gig at Twilio. He persuaded the cloud communications company to let him not only work but also live remotely. “We really did like living in the Bay Area,” Anderle says. “We couldn’t see a viable path to do that that didn’t involve delaying the things we wanted for 10 years while we saved.”

MORE:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-19/the-case-for-working-in-silicon-valley-and-living-in-the-rust-belt
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Offline KJP

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #88 on: December 09, 2016, 12:00:16 PM »
Let’s relocate a bunch of government agencies to the Midwest
Time to shift economic activity from the overcrowded coasts to places that need more of it.
Updated by Matthew Yglesias@mattyglesiasmatt@vox.com  Dec 9, 2016, 8:30am EST

America’s post-industrial Midwest is far from being the country’s poorest region. To find the direst economic conditions in the United States, one generally has to look toward Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta region, the Rio Grande Valley, and a smattering of heavily Native American counties in the Southwest and Great Plains. What the Midwest’s recent economic struggles bring, however, is not just large-scale political salience but a particular kind of fixability.

The poorest places in the United States have been poor for a very long time and lack the basic infrastructure of prosperity. But that’s not true in the Midwest, where cities were thriving two generations ago and where an enormous amount of infrastructure is in place. Midwestern states have acclaimed public university systems, airports that are large enough to serve as major hubs, and cities whose cultural legacies include major league pro sports teams, acclaimed museums, symphonies, theaters, and other amenities of big-city living.

MORE:
http://www.vox.com/new-money/2016/12/9/13881712/move-government-to-midwest
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Offline Dougal

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #89 on: December 09, 2016, 11:47:28 PM »
Let’s relocate a bunch of government agencies to the Midwest
Time to shift economic activity from the overcrowded coasts to places that need more of it.

This was tried during the Nixon Administration and called the GOWN Program for Get Out of Washington Now. The idea was it would take a strain off Washington's physical resources as well as force a lot of retirements by superannuated people who would refuse to move. It turned out the hotshots said the action is in Washington - I'll quit and go to another agency; and the old folks said hey, that place (wherever they were slated to go) might make a nice retirement home. The program was a total failure.

What the Feds could do is carve out some non-policy making, back office functions and move them individually. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, to pick a random example, is pretty portable. There are lots of other technical operations (Census Bureau, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Library of Congress's electronic archives, etc.) that could move easily.

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #90 on: December 10, 2016, 09:05:39 AM »
This sounds kind of welfare-y to me. Like how they beefed up all of those old military bases named after Confederate Generals in the South while letting Midwestern ones named after Presidents and U.S. war heroes die off.

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #91 on: February 23, 2017, 08:26:08 PM »
Hospitals Play a Key Role in Building Pathways Out of Poverty
https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/hospitals-play-key-role-building-pathways-out-of-poverty
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Offline UrbanSurfin

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #92 on: February 24, 2017, 09:32:09 AM »
It's a tough change for hospitals to make, and they're often forced by resentful neighbors to do so. Aultman didn't do much for its Canton neighborhood for a long time until all the current big planning efforts came up. In Columbus, one urban hospital on the near West Side is packing up and moving to the 'burbs -- leaving all its investment behind and building anew in a way that surely will affect health-care costs. Meanwhile, on the near East Side the ever-expanding children's hospital is finally talking to its neighbors and acknowledging its community after decades of tearing down homes for parking lots. Hospitals, universities, and churches are some of the biggest destroyers of neighborhoods in the quest for surface parking.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #93 on: March 02, 2017, 10:18:48 AM »
It certainly would be nice if these quasi-public entities and large NGOs had to deal with the same opposition that the private sector does. It would disarm right-wing complainers and force better urban design on those that think they are above the law.

Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #94 on: March 02, 2017, 10:29:19 AM »
Every time a hospital expands, that parcel stops paying property tax.  This is a major flaw in the concept of building an economy around them.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #95 on: March 02, 2017, 10:52:19 AM »
^I think it's a little more complicated than that. The City of Cleveland literally collects 10x as much from income taxes than property taxes at this point, and hospitals are income bonanzas. Schools definitely take a nominal hit, but at the same time, unlike residential property, hospitals don't consume school district resources, so it's not as bad as, say, tax abated or non-profit housing.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #96 on: March 04, 2017, 11:50:57 AM »
Even if a hospital worker lives out in the sticks (like many do) the city still gets dibs on their earnings taxes. Townships cannot institute earnings taxes.

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #97 on: March 04, 2017, 01:08:54 PM »
^I think it's a little more complicated than that. The City of Cleveland literally collects 10x as much from income taxes than property taxes at this point, and hospitals are income bonanzas. Schools definitely take a nominal hit, but at the same time, unlike residential property, hospitals don't consume school district resources, so it's not as bad as, say, tax abated or non-profit housing.

2 questions are raised by this:  why, and is it the best way forward?  Income taxes just went up and that's not exactly the best way to attract non-hospital employers nor residents who work elsewhere.
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #98 on: March 16, 2017, 06:52:18 PM »
Long video but an interesting watch:


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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #99 on: April 11, 2017, 07:12:39 AM »
The Preston model: UK takes lessons in recovery from rust-belt Cleveland
As councils struggle with cuts, one Lancastrian city adapted a pioneering grassroots approach from America to tackling inequality and keeping profits local
Hazel Sheffield in Preston
Tuesday 11 April 2017 02.15 EDT Last modified on Tuesday 11 April 2017 06.24 EDT

Ted Howard looks out on a group of people drinking tea from styrofoam cups at Preston town hall on a Monday afternoon in March. The social entrepreneur and author from Cleveland, Ohio, is the special guest at the city’s monthly social forum. “What’s happening in this community is historic – it blows my mind,” he tells the city councillors and local business owners. “We’re working out how to build an inclusive economy.”

Howard’s infectious enthusiasm has made him the de facto spokesperson for “community wealth building”, a way of tackling inequality by ensuring the economic development of a place is shared more equally among its residents.

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https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/apr/11/preston-cleveland-model-lessons-recovery-rust-belt
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #100 on: April 21, 2017, 09:17:40 AM »
Let’s relocate a bunch of government agencies to the Midwest
Time to shift economic activity from the overcrowded coasts to places that need more of it.
Updated by Matthew Yglesias@mattyglesiasmatt@vox.com  Dec 9, 2016, 8:30am EST

MORE:
http://www.vox.com/new-money/2016/12/9/13881712/move-government-to-midwest

Rep. Tim Ryan suggests relocating federal agencies outside Washington, D.C.
By Sabrina Eaton, cleveland.com
on April 20, 2017 at 6:39 PM, updated April 20, 2017 at 8:41 PM

WASHINGTON, D. C. - Could federal employment transplanted from the nation's capital replace some of the jobs lost in other parts of the country?

That's what Rep. Tim Ryan wants to find out.

The Niles Democrat introduced legislation Thursday that would establish a commission to study relocating federal agencies to economically distressed parts of the country, or "areas with expertise in the mission and goal of the agency."

While the congressman said the nation should be proud of Washington, D.C. and its historic role, he said "the Founding Fathers could not have imagined our current federal government system, with more than 300,000 federal workers in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area in 190 federally-owned buildings and 500 leased buildings."

MORE:
http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/04/rep_tim_ryan_suggests_relocati.html#incart_most-commented_metro_article
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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #101 on: April 21, 2017, 10:45:53 AM »
Let’s relocate a bunch of government agencies to the Midwest
Time to shift economic activity from the overcrowded coasts to places that need more of it.
Updated by Matthew Yglesias@mattyglesiasmatt@vox.com  Dec 9, 2016, 8:30am EST

MORE:
http://www.vox.com/new-money/2016/12/9/13881712/move-government-to-midwest

Rep. Tim Ryan suggests relocating federal agencies outside Washington, D.C.
By Sabrina Eaton, cleveland.com
on April 20, 2017 at 6:39 PM, updated April 20, 2017 at 8:41 PM

WASHINGTON, D. C. - Could federal employment transplanted from the nation's capital replace some of the jobs lost in other parts of the country?

That's what Rep. Tim Ryan wants to find out.

The Niles Democrat introduced legislation Thursday that would establish a commission to study relocating federal agencies to economically distressed parts of the country, or "areas with expertise in the mission and goal of the agency."

While the congressman said the nation should be proud of Washington, D.C. and its historic role, he said "the Founding Fathers could not have imagined our current federal government system, with more than 300,000 federal workers in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area in 190 federally-owned buildings and 500 leased buildings."

MORE:
http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/04/rep_tim_ryan_suggests_relocati.html#incart_most-commented_metro_article

Tim Ryan is such a good congressman, the Democrats lost a good opportunity to move more to the center after this last election, When they stuck with Nancy Pelosi instead of going with Tim.

Offline plinth857

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #102 on: April 21, 2017, 11:00:38 AM »
Let’s relocate a bunch of government agencies to the Midwest
Time to shift economic activity from the overcrowded coasts to places that need more of it.

I'd love to see the NIH in Cleveland.  Especially since it's not even in DC proper.  It would match well with the city's large healthcare presence.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 11:00:59 AM by plinth857 »

Offline 327

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #103 on: April 21, 2017, 11:58:33 AM »
Tim Ryan is such a good congressman, the Democrats lost a good opportunity to move more to the center after this last election, When they stuck with Nancy Pelosi instead of going with Tim.

Do you mean geographic center?  I think Ryan is great but would not call him a centrist.  He was trying to pull the party leftward against Pelosi's coastal centrist orthodoxy, economically speaking.  His point in running for leader was to refocus the party on economic populism, which goes hand in hand with granting more influence to the rust belt.
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Offline Dougal

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Re: Rust Belt Revival Ideas, Predictions & Articles
« Reply #104 on: April 22, 2017, 02:05:46 PM »

WASHINGTON, D. C. - Could federal employment transplanted from the nation's capital replace some of the jobs lost in other parts of the country?

That's what Rep. Tim Ryan wants to find out.

The Niles Democrat introduced legislation Thursday that would establish a commission to study relocating federal agencies to economically distressed parts of the country, or "areas with expertise in the mission and goal of the agency."


This is not a new idea. In the Nixon years the Feds came up with the GOWN (Get Out of Washington Now) Program. For various reasons it went nowhere.

A better approach for Cleveland would be for area congressmen (and local civic sponsors) to pick something small and new to go after. An example might be the NIH's radiographic data repository. It's not wildly glamorous; it's physical location isn't especially important; and it's a small program. It will, however, be "huge and beautiful", as somebody in DC might say, in the future. Local sponsors would need to offer incentives, but they wouldn't need to be too great. Plus the city with Picker, Hitachi, ViewRay, etc., has "radiology credentials" as good as anybody's.   This approach is how Baltimore ended up with 20,000+ Social Security jobs.   

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