Author Topic: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development  (Read 113717 times)

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Offline 327

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #420 on: April 06, 2017, 10:35:40 AM »
I like the overall arrangement and design in those pictures but now I'm really confused.  This isn't just boxes, it's construction using boxes, which means sinking money and effort into something that's still boxes when we're done.  Kinsman deserves real buildings, just like the rest of Cleveland.

Apparently it doesn't, yet.   These are infinitely better than vacant fields and ruins.

If they succeed, they help justify more permanent structures.


That logic is what concerns me.  A weak stab is being substituted for a full go, with performance of the weak stab being used to determine the hypothetical success of a full go.  First of all, apples and oranges.  But if this doesn't work, even if the problem is site choice or single-use or the limitations of shipping containers or whatever, it becomes a new argument for the TJ Dows of the world to use against honest to goodness urban retail.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2017, 10:36:08 AM by 327 »
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Offline jws

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #421 on: April 06, 2017, 10:37:30 AM »
I actually really like these concepts. This type of container architecture can go pretty far and I think can make for an interesting space, so I don't really see this type of development as "less than."

I'd actually love to see it duplicated on the West Side along stretches like Madison where there are some sprawling parking lots and substandard buildings that don't conform to an urban environment (Dollar General, Gryo George, etc).

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #422 on: April 08, 2017, 01:18:27 PM »
I like the overall arrangement and design in those pictures but now I'm really confused.  This isn't just boxes, it's construction using boxes, which means sinking money and effort into something that's still boxes when we're done.  Kinsman deserves real buildings, just like the rest of Cleveland.

Apparently it doesn't, yet.   These are infinitely better than vacant fields and ruins.

If they succeed, they help justify more permanent structures.


That logic is what concerns me.  A weak stab is being substituted for a full go, with performance of the weak stab being used to determine the hypothetical success of a full go.  First of all, apples and oranges.  But if this doesn't work, even if the problem is site choice or single-use or the limitations of shipping containers or whatever, it becomes a new argument for the TJ Dows of the world to use against honest to goodness urban retail.

It's not the "Dows" that the viability of neighborhoods has to be proven to.  It's private sector investors and entrepreneurs.
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #423 on: April 20, 2017, 09:27:08 AM »
A few demolitions are on design-review's agenda this week including this, which appears to be part of a larger vision for lower Kinsman including a nature center....

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2017/04212017/index.php
EAST2017-011 – Proposed Demolition of a One-Story Institutional Use Building
Project Address: 6833 Berwick Road
Project Representative: Jason Minter, Burten, Bell, Carr Development











http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2017/04212017/image/6833_Berwick_06.jpg
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Offline down4cle

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #424 on: April 20, 2017, 09:31:22 AM »
^ I sure hope the Sidaway Bridge gets put back into use as part of broader greenway plan.

Offline yanni_gogolak

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #425 on: April 25, 2017, 01:06:35 PM »
I like the overall arrangement and design in those pictures but now I'm really confused.  This isn't just boxes, it's construction using boxes, which means sinking money and effort into something that's still boxes when we're done.  Kinsman deserves real buildings, just like the rest of Cleveland.

Talk about oversimplifying it. This a commercial project and has to meet the same requirements as any other commercial building.

Here's another project that's a "...still boxes when we're done."





At any rate, the project received planning approval.
http://www.thearchoffice.com/2017/04/24/boxspot-gets-nod-cleveland-planning-commission/

Offline 327

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #426 on: April 25, 2017, 01:41:55 PM »
I meant literally boxes, as in metal crates not intended for human occupancy.  The nucleus tower design is a bit boxy for my preference but that's a matter of aesthetics.  There we're talking about an actual building, a significant one, rather than recycled trailer parts.  I hope we can agree that recognizing this distinction is more than just a failure to think outside the box.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 02:08:24 PM by 327 »
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #427 on: May 01, 2017, 04:24:55 PM »
Cleveland city council approves plan to reopen East Side Market
September 28, 2015
LEE CHILCOTE

Cleveland’s East Side Market closed in 2007, leaving behind an empty building in the heart of the Glenville neighborhood. Now a plan is underway to reopen the municipally owned facility, which launched in 1988 as a fresh foods market for the city’s northeastern neighborhoods, as a full-service grocery store, health clinic and hub for food-related businesses.

At the request of Cleveland City Council members Kevin Conwell, Jeff Johnson and Mike Polensek, council at a Sept. 14 meeting approved leasing the property to Northeast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services (NEON), a nonprofit that operates community health centers in Cleveland and East Cleveland. The city will lease the property at East 105th and St. Clair for just $1 per year. Using both public and private funds, NEON aims to complete a $3.5 million renovation that it says will create at least 103 jobs.

The most significant part of the project is the fact that it will bring a new fresh foods market to an area that is considered a food desert. Mazzulo’s Fresh Market, a family-owned grocer with two small stores in Aurora and Bainbridge, has signed a letter of intent to lease 13,000 square feet of the property at a price of $15 per square foot. The new Mazzulo’s will be stocked with fresh meats, seafood and fruits and vegetables and will also have a small outdoor café with Wi-Fi.

MORE:
http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150928/BLOGS16/150929832/cleveland-city-council-approves-plan-to-reopen-east-side-market

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2017/pdf/NE_Design_Review_Agenda_05-2-17.pdf

8:40am 3. NE 2017-015 —Gateway 105 Farmer’s Market – New Construction (N)
Glenville Design Review District
Location: 1318-1322 E. 105th St
Seeking schematic approval for the proposed new construction of a temporary
fresh market stand and community space.
Project Representative: Julie Criscione, JMC Owner’s Rep Services, LLC
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Offline yanni_gogolak

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #428 on: May 02, 2017, 10:34:03 AM »
I meant literally boxes, as in metal crates not intended for human occupancy.  The nucleus tower design is a bit boxy for my preference but that's a matter of aesthetics.  There we're talking about an actual building, a significant one, rather than recycled trailer parts.  I hope we can agree that recognizing this distinction is more than just a failure to think outside the box.

Well played....

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development
« Reply #429 on: May 15, 2017, 11:42:13 PM »
Despite redlining and foreclosure, Cleveland's East Side could grow with smart investment: panel (photos)
By Steven Litt, The Plain Dealer
on May 11, 2017 at 10:05 AM

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, Ohio - There's a deep connection between the history of redlining on the East Side of Cleveland and the continuing decline of neighborhoods hollowed out by subprime lending and the mortgage foreclosure crisis of the 2000s.

So said Terry Schwarz, director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative in her kickoff to a panel discussion on why redevelopment in poor, predominantly black neighborhoods on the city's East Side is lagging that of the West Side.

To illustrate her point, she showed contemporary maps of distressed and foreclosed properties on the East Side of Cleveland that looked eerily similar to redlining maps of the 1930s and '40s.

MORE:
http://www.cleveland.com/architecture/index.ssf/2017/05/despite_legacy_of_redlining_an.html
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