Author Topic: American Regional Dialects  (Read 31788 times)

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Offline Hts121

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #210 on: March 14, 2017, 05:26:05 PM »
It's not uniform anywhere. People from different parts of Cleveland speak very differently.  I can often tell what area someone is from, especially if they are from the south to southwest side if Greater Cleveland. Maybe not a distinction people from outside of Ohio can pick up on.

The weirdest accent in Ohio to my ears is Dayton. I don't know WTF that is.  Some type of really odd drawl.  Columbus and Cincy not so much, but still there. 
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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #211 on: March 14, 2017, 11:43:38 PM »
I have two friends that grew up on the same street in Parma, just outside of Cleveland.

One has a cat. The other has a keyyyyattttt.

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #212 on: March 14, 2017, 11:54:23 PM »
does one eat eggs and the other eats aaaayyyygs?

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #213 on: March 15, 2017, 01:41:04 AM »
does one eat eggs and the other eats aaaayyyygs?

I take it you're familiar with this aaayyyyaccent haha!

Offline IAGuy39

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #214 on: March 15, 2017, 10:09:07 AM »
I've been down to the Lexington area in KY quite a bit lately for work, and I've noticed it is almost like I don't notice much of a southern accent at all living in Cincinnati now for 4! years.  It's almost like there isn't much difference from Cincinnati down to Lexington, though it depends I guess a bit.  We do business in southern KY and they have their own type of accent, I actually really like the one down in that area, KY definitely has it's own twang.

I was back in North Iowa recently and I forgot all about that accent up there, it was almost annoying me.  My mom had surgery and I was getting some extra bandages, etc. at the local store, and when I was checking out the lady goes "Oh garsh do you got a boo-boo!?"  I was like "No, my mom had surgery...", I wasn't in the best of moods, so maybe that explains it annoying me.

Funny how that works out though...


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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #215 on: March 15, 2017, 10:14:29 AM »
I've noticed some Ohioans in more rural parts of NEO who pronounce wash like warsh.  I'm not sure of the origin of that but perhaps it is Appalachian.

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #216 on: March 15, 2017, 10:23:28 AM »


I was back in North Iowa recently and I forgot all about that accent up there, it was almost annoying me.  My mom had surgery and I was getting some extra bandages, etc. at the local store, and when I was checking out the lady goes "Oh garsh do you got a boo-boo!?"  I was like "No, my mom had surgery...", I wasn't in the best of moods, so maybe that explains it annoying me.

Funny how that works out though...



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Offline Hts121

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #217 on: March 15, 2017, 10:30:10 AM »
I've noticed some Ohioans in more rural parts of NEO who pronounce wash like warsh.  I'm not sure of the origin of that but perhaps it is Appalachian.

It is a part of the midland accent.... basically the areas directly west of D.C., including southern Ohio
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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #218 on: March 15, 2017, 10:32:08 AM »
I've heard it in Geauga County and Ashtabula County.  It must be family roots from southern Ohio or midland are I guess. Similar to AAVE having its roots in the south.

Offline ColDayMan

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #219 on: March 15, 2017, 10:43:35 AM »
I've heard it in Geauga County and Ashtabula County.  It must be family roots from southern Ohio or midland are I guess. Similar to AAVE having its roots in the south.

Ashtabula and Geauga Counties aren't exactly that far from Appalachia...
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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #220 on: March 15, 2017, 10:48:36 AM »
^ true

Offline IAGuy39

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #221 on: March 15, 2017, 10:51:49 AM »
I've noticed some Ohioans in more rural parts of NEO who pronounce wash like warsh.  I'm not sure of the origin of that but perhaps it is Appalachian.

I'm not sure what the origins are.  It is used all the time in North Iowa especially by the older folks.  I kind of wonder if it is an older German thing.  My mother's parents are both almost 100% German, and I also hear it from my gf's grandmother here in Cincinnati who is almost 100% German.

The other common thing you hear a lot up there is there long "ohhh" on everything like "Minnesohtah" or "Dakohtah".  The other thing that I actually think is awesome is the expression "Well isn't that for darn sure!"

In the movie Fargo they really took it to another level with the "Well yah darn tootin'...!" but I've never really ever heard anyone say that before, maybe only a few times.  I've heard a lot of Wisconsin people say something like "You're pulling my leg aren't ya Gary!?" but that's about as far out of the Fargo talk I've ever heard

Offline David

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Re: American Regional Dialects
« Reply #222 on: March 21, 2017, 12:18:03 AM »
I've noticed some Ohioans in more rural parts of NEO who pronounce wash like warsh.  I'm not sure of the origin of that but perhaps it is Appalachian.

I'm not sure what the origins are.  It is used all the time in North Iowa especially by the older folks.  I kind of wonder if it is an older German thing.  My mother's parents are both almost 100% German, and I also hear it from my gf's grandmother here in Cincinnati who is almost 100% German.

It's Scottish / Irish influence. Just think of how Scots and the Irish say "arse" with unnecessary rhoticity. It's part of the older Midland accent. My Great Grandma who just passed, used to say it all the time. Essentially it's used (although obviously almost extinct at this point) west of D.C.; Appalachia on through Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, Indiana and Illinois; most of Missouri; and Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, much of Kansas and west Texas. It was very common and not exclusive to one region. I've read that it's even common in some parts of Canada where Scottish and Irish immigrants settled.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 12:20:16 AM by David »
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