Author Topic: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch  (Read 183739 times)

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Offline TheCOV

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #945 on: July 28, 2016, 11:27:39 PM »
We've already destroyed plenty of this beautiful city.

Offline TroyEros

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #946 on: July 29, 2016, 12:21:03 AM »
Honestly I think the fact that there IS so much of it really hurts preservation efforts, as paradoxical as it seems. This, coupled with the fact that Cincinnatians don't seem to travel much to see that their collection of historic buildings is actually something very unique, makes it all but impossible to convince many people that it's worth saving. To them, it's "old and worthless" and any new development, no matter how schlocky and terrible, is considered an upgrade just by virtue of its newness. If people would realize that there really is nothing like these neighborhoods elsewhere in the country, they might have more of a fighting chance, but the region needs to see the inherent value in these old buildings first. Uptown is going to struggle the most with this because the two groups of people who are probably going to care the least about historic preservation are college students and absentee landlords.

By and large, people don't have to fight these fights in other cities. Columbus gets it, and Cleveland has started to get it - hell, they completely rebuilt one of the Playhouse Square lobbies that burned down fifty years ago to its original grandeur (not to mention the Heinens and everything else along Euclid). There should be this level of activism in Cincinnati, which has far and away the best collection of historic urban fabric in this part of the country, but no one will step up to the plate. We shouldn't be fighting battles of the Dennison, or over Union Terminal for f**k's sake. Who in their right mind would actually say "it's an old drain on finances, tear it down?" It's one kind of unforgiveable when we lose places like the West End, but when we have people in this region who don't even care about Union Terminal and Music Hall, it's a very, very difficult war to fight.

 I would argue that Cleveland still doesn't get it. There are literally disappearing neighborhoods in the outer ring urban neighborhoods of cleveland. Lets not forget that whole casino debacle either. Cleveland is just as bad as Cincy.

 Alot of Cincinnatians and Americans think historic american architecture is very samey, and boring. Lack of details, and very plain to the eye. I can understand that in some ways. Definitely lacks the grandiosity in fine intimate details of historic European architecture. Plus every historic building in Cincinnati you can most likely find similar buildings in Columbus or Cleveland or NYC, or Boston. There's not that level of culture in it's architecture that so many European countries have. There's nothing unique so to speak, nothing that a Cincinnatian can identify with and point out that is completely unique to there city in terms of architecture. You can find Italianate historic structures in literally any east coast city you travel to.

That's why I think there's a lack of care in some respects to historic old buildings, they are every where in america (not a dying breed so to speak where you can only travel to X part of the country to see such buildings), and antiquated in many average people eyes. Plus there's a lack of culture IMO. Many of us are german, and the city of cincinnati is many our grandfathers and great grandparents grew up in and established there roots. I think that many cincinnatians have an identity crisis, and can't really relate to Cincinnati and there own personal history and culture. A void, so to speak.

That said the craftsman ship in just the pure brick work is leagues upon anything we have now.

« Last Edit: July 29, 2016, 12:29:58 AM by TroyEros »

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #947 on: July 29, 2016, 08:46:03 AM »
So much got built in Ohio from 1880-1930 that some repetition was unavoidable.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2016, 08:46:19 AM by GCrites80s »

Offline neilworms

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #948 on: July 29, 2016, 10:32:48 AM »
Its so crazy how blind Cincinnati is to its architectural treasure.  Every other city that has it in the US seems to recognize and celebrate it a lot more.   I do see signs of hope towards change though - it seems that younger folks in Cincy are much more proactive towards realizing how important the cities historic treasure is.  Preservation groups in other cities have this stereotype of being "old ladies clubs" but I've noticed in Cincy some of the best preservation advocates have been folks my age and younger.

Being from closer to Dayton originally I guess gave me an insider and outsiders perspective, inside enough to Cincinnati to understand the city mentality but outsider enough to realize what's wrong with it.

10 years ago the Dennison would have gone down without even a fight.  Things are moving in the right direction, I just hope it isn't too late.   Wish more of Walnut Hills especially had been saved.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2016, 10:33:35 AM by neilworms »

Offline TroyEros

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #949 on: July 29, 2016, 04:27:57 PM »
Its so crazy how blind Cincinnati is to its architectural treasure.  Every other city that has it in the US seems to recognize and celebrate it a lot more.   I do see signs of hope towards change though - it seems that younger folks in Cincy are much more proactive towards realizing how important the cities historic treasure is.  Preservation groups in other cities have this stereotype of being "old ladies clubs" but I've noticed in Cincy some of the best preservation advocates have been folks my age and younger.

Being from closer to Dayton originally I guess gave me an insider and outsiders perspective, inside enough to Cincinnati to understand the city mentality but outsider enough to realize what's wrong with it.

10 years ago the Dennison would have gone down without even a fight.  Things are moving in the right direction, I just hope it isn't too late.   Wish more of Walnut Hills especially had been saved.

I think what your going to end up having is most of OTR salvaged, the OLD West End will follow through when OTR gets built out. Brighton/Mohawk district will be salvaged as well as part of the OTR, "Super Block", along side Pendelton as well.

The problem is that millennials are very passionate for OTR, and will do anything to save any structure in that district. But if it's a historic building in Walnut Hills there's not many care's given. I don't understand how this big disconnect came about, but millennials are very territorial nowadays with preservation, and right now they only thing they care about is preserving OTR.

 Which I get. There's nothing like OTR. There's nothing like it's narrow streets, and hidden alleyways. It's really special, and Walnut Hills lacks that super star gloss that OTR has. But still preservation should apply to every neighborhood, and favoritism towards one particular neighborhood over the other is BS.

 But sadly that's currently how it is. Lots of love for millennials and OTR. Other neighborhoods, not so much...

Offline taestell

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #950 on: July 29, 2016, 10:06:51 PM »
In my opinion, historic preservation only really matters when you can save a whole street or whole district worth of buildings. Of course there are exceptions where a single, historically significant building should be saved. But in general, what we want to save is the historic feeling of the neighborhood.

In a neighborhood like Corryville where entire blocks are being demolished for low quality student housing, why even bother to fight that fight? Uptown Properties has the time and money to fight the historic preservationists, and even if we win, we might save 1 block of buildings in a neighborhood that's full of junk like VP3. It makes much more sense to focus our effort on areas where we can actually have an impact and start to send a message to developers: "You can not demolish an historic building in OTR. Period."
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Offline TroyEros

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #951 on: July 30, 2016, 02:34:44 AM »
In my opinion, historic preservation only really matters when you can save a whole street or whole district worth of buildings. Of course there are exceptions where a single, historically significant building should be saved. But in general, what we want to save is the historic feeling of the neighborhood.

In a neighborhood like Corryville where entire blocks are being demolished for low quality student housing, why even bother to fight that fight? Uptown Properties has the time and money to fight the historic preservationists, and even if we win, we might save 1 block of buildings in a neighborhood that's full of junk like VP3. It makes much more sense to focus our effort on areas where we can actually have an impact and start to send a message to developers: "You can not demolish an historic building in OTR. Period."

Very true.

 I also think that at the end of the day that many young cincinnatians are finally realizing how important OTR is to our culture of Cincinnati. OTR isn't just a neighborhood, but rather a vital lifeline to our past. It's history is profound, and the buildings become more than just old and antiquated buildings, but rather a key connection to our past and history.

 Other neighborhoods struggle establishing that identity that OTR has been able to establish recently with our millienials. I really think it's because it's not just about the architecture, but it's also about being able to live in a neighborhood that has so much history and meaning that OTR has to Cincinnati.

I think at the end of the day, I'll trade a 100% fully rehabbed OTR/Pendelton/Old West End/Mohawk/Brighton district, and be perfectly fine with losing everything else. There's nothing like OTR in cincinnati. No other neighborhood compares to it's beauty, and it's street layout, and it's history. Oh and the views! Certain houses on mulberry street over look above all of OTR, and downtown cincinnati. It's so damn priceless, and on a crisp sunrise there's nothing more beautiful to witness the sunrise against the historic brick row houses and church steeples.

  No other neighborhood holds the sheer magnitude of potential that OTR holds. OTR is a neighborhood time capsule that is rare to find nowadays in the midwest, and is continually disappearing in other major cities, and I promise you that it will become a premier attraction for our city when everything is built out and gentrified.

 I've grown to become a preservationist through my discovery and love for OTR. But I'll admit, my love for Cincinnati is really only because of  my discovery of OTR. It's that special of a neighborhood for me, and I'm literally obsessed with the potential it holds (in terms of rehabilitation and infill and just continued gentrification northwards).

 But it still saddens me regardless to see continue destruction of other neighborhoods, especially when it's for surface lots or ugly infill.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 02:47:05 AM by TroyEros »

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #952 on: March 29, 2017, 12:55:41 PM »
Is 444 3rd St (Old Dunhumby HQ) slated to be demolished?   
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Offline seicer

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #953 on: March 29, 2017, 01:11:25 PM »
Yes. Why?

Offline taestell

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #954 on: March 29, 2017, 01:38:41 PM »
I thought that the latest plans for the BSB worked around the building so demolition wasn't necessary. Are they demolishing it anyway?
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Offline seicer

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #955 on: March 29, 2017, 01:56:23 PM »
I had not seen any revised drawings, but any BSB construction is years off. Demolition for it wouldn't happen this soon.

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #956 on: March 29, 2017, 02:34:10 PM »
Yes. Why?

I was told they had demo fencing around it by someone in casual conversation today.   I certainly hope that's not the case.   
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Offline oakiehigh

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Offline seicer

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #958 on: March 29, 2017, 02:57:13 PM »
It doesn't indicate if this is for BSB or for I-75 north modifications. But it's from ODOT, so I wonder what's up?

Offline Ram23

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #959 on: March 29, 2017, 03:04:30 PM »
ODOT owns the property. The demo permit states: "MASS DEMOLITION ONLY - FUTURE PARKING LOT UNDER SEPARATE PERMIT AND REQUIRES ZONING HEARING EXAMINER APPROVAL"

Offline ColDayMan

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #960 on: March 31, 2017, 11:31:38 AM »
Former DunnhumbyUSA HQ in downtown Cincinnati to be demolished



The former home of DunnhumbyUSA in downtown Cincinnati is being prepared for demolition.

Groundwork for the future demolition of the Dunnhumby building at 444 W. Third St. started this week. Crews are performing general survey work and installing temporary chain link fence along the perimeter of the project.

More below:
http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2017/03/31/former-dunnhumbyusa-hq-in-downtown-cincinnati-to.html
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Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #961 on: March 31, 2017, 11:49:24 AM »
Kind of amazing how much has been spent on the Brent Spence Bridge project and it might never happen. 

Offline jwulsin

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #962 on: April 17, 2017, 11:47:03 AM »

Offline seicer

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #963 on: April 17, 2017, 01:50:20 PM »
Damn. That was one of my favorite stretches of road and now it's become every bit as soulless.

Offline taestell

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #964 on: April 17, 2017, 02:32:37 PM »
I have very little hope for historic preservation in Uptown. It isn't even on the radar of the Uptown Consortium, and they are perfectly fine with the hospitals, the Zoo, UC, and Uptown Properties demolishing historic buildings and building whatever they want. To make matters worse, the new stuff that's getting built in Uptown is dense but not actually that walkable.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2017, 02:32:57 PM by taestell »
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Offline CincyMan

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« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 11:47:13 AM by CincyMan »

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #966 on: April 18, 2017, 10:20:40 AM »
They've started demolition on two of these three on Vine:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1542621,-84.5065343,3a,75y,91h,92.64t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbk2pz3HG7VGZiQicsDZ3vg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en


Those have been vacant since 2009, if not earlier.  They looked like they were going to do work on them a year or two ago. 


Offline ryanlammi

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #967 on: April 18, 2017, 10:24:55 AM »
And I think it's this little one on Mulberry:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1186932,-84.5162538,3a,75y,232.95h,80.38t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sFWtLRvMPLUXSLBmfZVeVrg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en

What about that one on Mulberry? They just repainted it and have been renovating it slowly.
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Offline jwulsin

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #968 on: April 18, 2017, 11:05:08 AM »
41 E Clifton is in the process of being demolished.

http://wedge3.hcauditor.org/view/re/0940005014400/2016/summary

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #969 on: April 18, 2017, 11:26:12 AM »
41 E Clifton is in the process of being demolished.

http://wedge3.hcauditor.org/view/re/0940005014400/2016/summary

Meanwhile, there have been a few renovations on E. Clifton over the past year.  But many of the buildings are in absolutely horrible condition. 

Offline CincyMan

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #970 on: April 18, 2017, 11:45:08 AM »
And I think it's this little one on Mulberry:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1186932,-84.5162538,3a,75y,232.95h,80.38t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sFWtLRvMPLUXSLBmfZVeVrg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en

What about that one on Mulberry? They just repainted it and have been renovating it slowly.

EDIT: It's that one on E Clifton. Whoops!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 11:46:40 AM by CincyMan »

Offline TroyEros

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #971 on: April 18, 2017, 12:55:44 PM »
Why are otr buildings still being demolished? Smh. Shouldn't this be approved by the hcb at the very least? It's covered by the historic boundaries no?

Offline taestell

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #972 on: April 18, 2017, 07:40:27 PM »
Facebook post from BrewRiver GastroPub:

Quote
Two days ago, the city tore down the house that adjoined our patio. We were given less than 24 hours notice and it has been stressful and chaotic (we were forced to close on Thursday.) However, as the great comedy troupe, Monty Python, says..."Always Look on The Bright Side of Life..."

BrewRiver's patio now has a fabulous breeze, and even more importantly, an extended river view that is incredible! Also, our entire 2nd floor main dining room now has a river view! We have really been struggling with all the construction traffic, and are so happy to see a positive come from many negatives!
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Offline jjakucyk

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #973 on: April 18, 2017, 08:00:54 PM »
The hillside slipping that's going on there along Riverside is frightening.  It's entirely possible the house was on the verge of falling over.  I just biked through there on Sunday (I don't recommend it, what with all the gravel and mud from construction) but I saw sidewalks buckling as far east as the newer townhouses/East End condos, which I think is beyond the work area.  Google Street View has only caught the very beginning of the problem at the old Verdin building.  It now stretches hundreds of feet in either direction.  https://goo.gl/maps/tWsri1MwDvA2

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Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #975 on: April 21, 2017, 09:21:42 AM »
^Yeah I used to live in a house in that expanding parking lot. 

Offline TroyEros

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #976 on: April 21, 2017, 02:31:52 PM »
Why was that building demolished? Looked pretty healthy to me? Is land being organized for some larger project?

Offline Wally

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #977 on: April 21, 2017, 02:42:29 PM »
^^Expanded zoo parking?  I presume that from the zoo's perspective, they'd love to buy every one of those houses in the surrounding block(s) to control that land?
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 02:43:27 PM by Wally »

Offline taestell

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #978 on: April 23, 2017, 07:05:13 PM »
Yep. The Zoo loves to brag about how "green" they are, but they don't seem to realize that buying up dense urban housing and demolishing it for parking is possibly the least green thing they could do.
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Offline Eighth and State

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Re: Cincinnati: Demolition Watch
« Reply #979 on: April 23, 2017, 08:06:53 PM »
^They do realize it. They are just stuck with regard to parking. Almost all of the visitors to the zoo are families that drive to the zoo for the day, and they bring their cars, or more likely, their SUV's and Minivans.

If you are the zoo, what could you do better? Tell your visitors to ride the bus? Build a parking garage? Turn them away when the parking lots are full?

Give them credit for staying in Cincinnati, please. They could have moved to Warren County and built a giant parking lot like Kings Island.

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