Author Topic: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering  (Read 13862 times)

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Offline E Rocc

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #70 on: June 17, 2017, 12:22:16 PM »
That chick is hot.

She's 31 with a kid now LOL
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Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #71 on: June 17, 2017, 03:35:01 PM »
^I remember reading that piece several years ago and don't completely agree with it.  Incidentally, there are a few guys in the punk rock world who owned their own labels in the 90s and now sit on truly insane piles of cash.  Ian Mackaye, Fat Mike from NOFX, Hellcat Records, etc.  Several of those guys are worth upwards of $50 million just from selling scads of records that sold fewer than 50,000 copies. 

Most of the basic points were completely true.  Bands had no oversight over costs that could be "recouped", and the various middlemen often didn't give a damn about the ultimate consumers or producers.   They could spend someone else's money to build their own influence.   And they controlled whether or not bands got heard, outside of live shows.

Well pop music isn't anything now like it was in the 70s-90s, and so because there isn't a canon, there is nothing specific for underground artists to react against.  Meanwhile, new bands are so accessible that there is no mystery. 

Entire realms of being a music fan are gone -- the record store and album artwork.  I spent a lot of time in record stores when I was a teenager going through every single record or CD in a particular section.  You could gain a lot of information on stuff you had no acute interest in.  Sure, you can waste a bunch of time on the internet now, but it's not the same because there isn't a visceral, physical object.  Album artwork doesn't exist anymore.  Most new music videos put up by unknown acts are dull and everyone's sick of the look of DSLR video. 

I went into Guitar Center this week for the first time in a few years.  It was a sad place.  Lots of just plain empty space in the store where there used to be stacks of amps.  The carpet is torn up and no money has been put into the place.  The spark of energy that used to be in every music store -- even the big chain ones -- is gone. 







« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 03:35:53 PM by jmecklenborg »

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #72 on: June 17, 2017, 04:03:57 PM »
I'm sure they're still making bank on synths, drum machines, and dj equipment.

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #73 on: June 17, 2017, 04:22:28 PM »
The Columbus and Dayton Guitar Centers appear to be doing fine, but it seems that much of the emphasis is indeed on the electronic, DJ and banjo fronts.

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #74 on: June 17, 2017, 05:12:31 PM »
Don't forget little ukulele's that can be played ironically.

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #75 on: June 17, 2017, 05:43:39 PM »
I'm sure they're still making bank on synths, drum machines, and dj equipment.

Around 2008 I was in the exact same Guitar Center (near Tri-County Mall) and went over to the DJ area and started hitting some buttons and twisting knobs on some dumb little box.  Some guy asked me if I was a DJ.  I looked at him bewildered and said no I just started hitting buttons and twisting knobs.




Offline taestell

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #76 on: June 20, 2017, 10:40:01 PM »
Time for a thread revival!   Love this article

Steve Earle: Bad Country Music Just 'Hip-Hop for People Who are Afraid of Black People'

http://www.nashvillescene.com/music/nashville-cream/article/20864796/steve-earle-bad-country-music-just-hiphop-for-people-who-are-afraid-of-black-people

Yep, bad mainstream rap and country music are both about namedropping what brand of alcohol you drink and what brand of car/truck you drive. You just choose your flavor based on whether you like southern accents and steel guitars or computer generated beats. Of course there is good music in both of those genres that does not fall into that trap.
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Offline gaslight

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #77 on: June 21, 2017, 07:58:07 AM »
I'm sure they're still making bank on synths, drum machines, and dj equipment.

Around 2008 I was in the exact same Guitar Center (near Tri-County Mall) and went over to the DJ area and started hitting some buttons and twisting knobs on some dumb little box.  Some guy asked me if I was a DJ.  I looked at him bewildered and said no I just started hitting buttons and twisting knobs.





That was back when you hit buttons, and twisted knobs. Now you just hit play.

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #78 on: June 21, 2017, 09:04:56 AM »
^Yes, I remember a British paper's preview of a DJ festival around 2014 which described each guy by saying "XXX DJ will press play on his laptop at 11pm, to be followed by YYY who will press play on his at 1am".

I couldn't find it but here is a similar one:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/20218681/do-superstar-djs-just-press-go-on-their-live-shows

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #79 on: June 21, 2017, 09:57:31 AM »
Time for a thread revival!   Love this article

Steve Earle: Bad Country Music Just 'Hip-Hop for People Who are Afraid of Black People'

http://www.nashvillescene.com/music/nashville-cream/article/20864796/steve-earle-bad-country-music-just-hiphop-for-people-who-are-afraid-of-black-people

Yep, bad mainstream rap and country music are both about namedropping what brand of alcohol you drink and what brand of car/truck you drive. You just choose your flavor based on whether you like southern accents and steel guitars or computer generated beats. Of course there is good music in both of those genres that does not fall into that trap.


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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #80 on: June 21, 2017, 12:39:58 PM »
^Yes, I remember a British paper's preview of a DJ festival around 2014 which described each guy by saying "XXX DJ will press play on his laptop at 11pm, to be followed by YYY who will press play on his at 1am".

Which makes me wonder why places in the flats, warehouse district, and w25th continue to pay hundreds of dollars a night for a guy to hit play on a 21st century mix tape when a Pandora station will do the same for 3.99 a month.

No seriously, at a previous job there were nights where the DJ didn't show and that's what we did. Nobody noticed the difference.
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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #81 on: June 21, 2017, 05:36:47 PM »
^Yes, I remember a British paper's preview of a DJ festival around 2014 which described each guy by saying "XXX DJ will press play on his laptop at 11pm, to be followed by YYY who will press play on his at 1am".

I couldn't find it but here is a similar one:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/20218681/do-superstar-djs-just-press-go-on-their-live-shows

From the article: "I used to perform with a band putting all sorts of work into a live show and I can tell you that the reaction was worse than it is when I'm DJ'ing."

Yeah, that's called sucking.  And pretty much verifies what I've known all along about DJ's and EDM "musicians", they do what they do because they can't hack being real musicians, but want the rockstar life.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2017, 05:38:24 PM by X »

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #82 on: June 21, 2017, 06:23:43 PM »
When I was a young lad around 1985 I remember watching a DJ work a wedding reception.  I watched for about five songs and had it figured out...

-get two record players
-while one song is playing, use headphones to cue up next song
-as song 1 fades out, hit crossfader to the second record
-periodically voice encouragement to crowd to come out and dance and clap for the bride & groom
-dim lights for ballads

The only thing I found impressive about it was how big the DJ's record collection was.  Otherwise, the whole thing bored me to death.  Meanwhile, any live music I saw at a wedding or event got 100% of my attention, even if it was a polka band. 


Offline E Rocc

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #83 on: June 21, 2017, 06:32:36 PM »
^Yes, I remember a British paper's preview of a DJ festival around 2014 which described each guy by saying "XXX DJ will press play on his laptop at 11pm, to be followed by YYY who will press play on his at 1am".

Which makes me wonder why places in the flats, warehouse district, and w25th continue to pay hundreds of dollars a night for a guy to hit play on a 21st century mix tape when a Pandora station will do the same for 3.99 a month.

No seriously, at a previous job there were nights where the DJ didn't show and that's what we did. Nobody noticed the difference.

We used to have a DJ some weekend nights, quit paying for itself years ago.  Some parties bring one in.

Only thing I miss is him having to listen to me about playing calmer music (when IMO it's needed to keep the crowd under some semblance of control) and stopping at the right time to close on time.   
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 11:49:58 AM by E Rocc »
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Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #84 on: June 21, 2017, 06:53:41 PM »
^What's up with the karaoke DJ ego?  I mean, seriously.  You show up with some microphones and some sound gear and have a binder with a bunch of songs in it and the girls come up and request a song.  How impressive. 

Offline E Rocc

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #85 on: June 22, 2017, 11:52:14 AM »
^What's up with the karaoke DJ ego?  I mean, seriously.  You show up with some microphones and some sound gear and have a binder with a bunch of songs in it and the girls come up and request a song.  How impressive. 

I'm sure the ego comes from "the girls come up" part.   Same as with bartenders and security.
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Offline Magyar

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #86 on: June 22, 2017, 09:34:28 PM »

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #87 on: Yesterday at 10:21:26 AM »
I didn't know things were that bad. If you listen to what's popular now you'll notice that not just the guitar is turned down, but almost all of the instruments except the drums. ALL of the melody comes from the vocals. Only electronic music is coming up with good instrument melodies and it has to be from specific genres within electronica or specific acts. There's very little in the way of inspiring riffs or basslines even on rock radio. Avenged Sevenfold are the only ones playing real licks and they've been around 15 years already.

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #88 on: Yesterday at 10:27:00 AM »
Also, I hate to say it since they're such fine instruments, but Les Pauls are totally overpowering the entire industry and have been for 15 years. That really stagnated the business.

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #89 on: Yesterday at 11:09:54 AM »
In 2001 I saw Chuck D give a talk on the college lecture circuit.  Early in the talk he noted that he was proud of the rise of hip-hop but resented that it killed off the guitar.  He recalled when he was a kid seeing people strumming guitars on front stoops all over the place but in the 1980s that disappeared.  I've seen hundreds of unknown bands and have probably only see 2 or 3 bands with a black guitarist who was raised in the hip-hop era. 

The most sensitive music "fans" in the world are electronic music fans.  They take it so damn seriously when it's an unlistenable joke!  Too bad we can't dig up Buddy Rich and put him on stage at one of these DJ fests. 

Offline bumsquare

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #90 on: Yesterday at 11:40:22 AM »
In 2001 I saw Chuck D give a talk on the college lecture circuit.  Early in the talk he noted that he was proud of the rise of hip-hop but resented that it killed off the guitar.  He recalled when he was a kid seeing people strumming guitars on front stoops all over the place but in the 1980s that disappeared.  I've seen hundreds of unknown bands and have probably only see 2 or 3 bands with a black guitarist who was raised in the hip-hop era. 

The most sensitive music "fans" in the world are electronic music fans.  They take it so damn seriously when it's an unlistenable joke!  Too bad we can't dig up Buddy Rich and put him on stage at one of these DJ fests.
I imagine most people don't have a clear grasp of what goes into making a good electro track. It generally requires greater understanding of compositional elements than rock music, and greater attention to details like precise frequency ranges. I think electronic music also lends itself to more interesting songs and compositions since it's not limited by guitar/bass/drum arrangements or human muscles. I'd much rather listen to the latest Katy Perry or Weeknd track than any generic, muddy, 90s grunge song.

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #91 on: Yesterday at 11:55:13 AM »
Most of the problem with bad electronic music has to do with the composer not recognizing that good melodies are important.

Offline jmecklenborg

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #92 on: Yesterday at 01:30:21 PM »
Electronic music people think they're free-soling El Capitan when all they're doing is fumbling around the climbing wall at their campus rec center. 

Offline mrnyc

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #93 on: Today at 02:10:35 AM »
When I was a young lad around 1985 I remember watching a DJ work a wedding reception.  I watched for about five songs and had it figured out...

-get two record players
-while one song is playing, use headphones to cue up next song
-as song 1 fades out, hit crossfader to the second record
-periodically voice encouragement to crowd to come out and dance and clap for the bride & groom
-dim lights for ballads

The only thing I found impressive about it was how big the DJ's record collection was.  Otherwise, the whole thing bored me to death.  Meanwhile, any live music I saw at a wedding or event got 100% of my attention, even if it was a polka band. 




lol -- a wedding dj

no, that kind of straight up dj'ing has nothing to do with the process and everything to do with style and choice --

if you want an example of doing that right, we follow ny night train around religiously, toubin is my boy --- he plays 60s soul nugget 45s & has guests, bands and a dance party. one of his recent flyers was h-bomb ferguson so thats pretty deep for non-cinci people:

http://www.newyorknighttrain.com


here's a blurb:

"A couple weeks back, I was at the awesome Beachland Ballroom in my hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, when I was lured into the venue's adjoining tavern by a throng so frenzied I thought Lady Gaga must have made an impromptu drop-by. Nope -- it was New York City DJ Jonathan Toubin, whose Soul Clap & Dance-Off has grown from its humble Brooklyn-underground beginnings to a national phenomenon. Armed with an exceptional collection of vintage soul and R&B 45s, Toubin has been crisscrossing the country, spinning tunes while dancers compete for the grand prize (in Nashville, $100). The scene in Cleveland was bonkers, as sweaty contestants -- identified by numbers on their backs -- writhed, squirmed, shimmied and bounced the night away, while onlookers cheered, laughed and gawked at the incredible display of flailing bodies." (Nashville Scene, 2011)



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Offline bumsquare

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #94 on: Today at 11:14:36 AM »
Electronic music people think they're free-soling El Capitan when all they're doing is fumbling around the climbing wall at their campus rec center.
Idk, I think there's bad electronic music just like there's bad guitar music. I don't understanding dismissing music based solely on the tools that are employed in its production. That sort of biased thinking can lead one to miss out on some great music.  A man has to have a code I guess though?

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Re: The Real Reason the Music industry is Suffering
« Reply #95 on: Today at 12:09:31 PM »
When I was a young lad around 1985 I remember watching a DJ work a wedding reception.  I watched for about five songs and had it figured out...

-get two record players
-while one song is playing, use headphones to cue up next song
-as song 1 fades out, hit crossfader to the second record
-periodically voice encouragement to crowd to come out and dance and clap for the bride & groom
-dim lights for ballads

The only thing I found impressive about it was how big the DJ's record collection was.  Otherwise, the whole thing bored me to death.  Meanwhile, any live music I saw at a wedding or event got 100% of my attention, even if it was a polka band. 




lol -- a wedding dj

no, that kind of straight up dj'ing has nothing to do with the process and everything to do with style and choice --

if you want an example of doing that right, we follow ny night train around religiously, toubin is my boy --- he plays 60s soul nugget 45s & has guests, bands and a dance party. one of his recent flyers was h-bomb ferguson so thats pretty deep for non-cinci people:

http://www.newyorknighttrain.com


here's a blurb:

"A couple weeks back, I was at the awesome Beachland Ballroom in my hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, when I was lured into the venue's adjoining tavern by a throng so frenzied I thought Lady Gaga must have made an impromptu drop-by. Nope -- it was New York City DJ Jonathan Toubin, whose Soul Clap & Dance-Off has grown from its humble Brooklyn-underground beginnings to a national phenomenon. Armed with an exceptional collection of vintage soul and R&B 45s, Toubin has been crisscrossing the country, spinning tunes while dancers compete for the grand prize (in Nashville, $100). The scene in Cleveland was bonkers, as sweaty contestants -- identified by numbers on their backs -- writhed, squirmed, shimmied and bounced the night away, while onlookers cheered, laughed and gawked at the incredible display of flailing bodies." (Nashville Scene, 2011)





Great, but who made those albums he was spinning in the first place?  Not him.  And who'll make the next round of great albums?  Not him.

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