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Author Topic: Political Correctness  (Read 31271 times)

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Offline YABO713

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #870 on: March 12, 2018, 12:01:24 PM »
^Right, abridging the right.

Time place and manner restrictions are acceptable in some circumstances, nonetheless.

Further, please don't site to Vox, Buzzfeed, Drudge, or Breitbart in this thread.

Offline Ram23

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #871 on: March 12, 2018, 12:16:22 PM »
These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.

What makes it a mob? Remember that Congress shall make no law abridging the right of the people to assemble.

The key word you omitted answers this question, IMO. "Peaceably." Many of the counter protests often found on college campuses in the wake of a conservative speaker don't comply with that prerequisite. Many of the now-common tactics like blocking interstate highways and marching down streets without doing the little bit of paperwork needed ahead of time don't, either.

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #872 on: March 12, 2018, 12:20:49 PM »
These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.

What makes it a mob? Remember that Congress shall make no law abridging the right of the people to assemble.

The key word you omitted answers this question, IMO. "Peaceably." Many of the counter protests often found on college campuses in the wake of a conservative speaker don't comply with that prerequisite. Many of the now-common tactics like blocking interstate highways and marching down streets without doing the little bit of paperwork needed ahead of time don't, either.

Again, using anecdotal evidence against a body of data.

Offline YABO713

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #873 on: March 12, 2018, 12:31:27 PM »
Unfortunately, most think tanks don't study Milo speeches. Additionally, my view of thinktank studies has went to sh** ever since a law school friend of mine went to work for Heritage Foundation and said the whole think tank industry is a sham.

Offline 327

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #874 on: March 12, 2018, 01:14:34 PM »
Unfortunately, most think tanks don't study Milo speeches. Additionally, my view of thinktank studies has went to sh** ever since a law school friend of mine went to work for Heritage Foundation and said the whole think tank industry is a sham.

Well... yeah.  They're lobbyists.  Once you know who they are and what they stand for, you also know what they're going to say.

Offline jonoh81

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #875 on: March 12, 2018, 03:44:03 PM »
So is Heather MacDonald some fiery provocateur invited "to speaking invitations that appear to have been constructed primarily for the purpose of attracting hecklers?"

The Campus Victim Cult

https://www.city-journal.org/html/campus-victim-cult-15644.html

The day before I was slated to speak at Claremont McKenna College last April, I got one of those red-flagged “urgent” e-mails from an administrator. She explained that the college had picked up word of a brewing protest, and was considering moving the event to a building with fewer plate-glass windows and better means of egress. This was not exactly reassuring.

After hearing no additional news about a potential disruption, the administration decided to keep the event in the original building, the Athenaeum. But by the time I arrived, a massive mob of protesters had gathered, so a police escort brought me into the building through a secret passageway.

The auditorium was almost completely empty. Some 300 students had blockaded the building, making mincemeat of the police barricades that had been set up to keep the entrances open. The police simply stood down, as is too often true in our Black Lives Matter era. They didn’t want to offend the students, and they certainly didn’t want to be caught on video using force.

But what was most disconcerting was the fact that the few people who were in the room were transfixed by what was happening outside. Students were shouting and pounding on the plate-glass windows. The lectern had been moved, before the speech, away from the windows, so that when the lights went on inside, I would not be visible to the mob outside.

I took two questions via livestreaming, and at that point the police decided that they could no longer guarantee my safety. They quickly devised an escape plan: I was hustled through the kitchen and into a waiting police van, and sped away to the Claremont Police Department.

The incident was not the high point of open-mindedness in academic history.


======================

Also, without access to the underlying data Vox was using, I could see one obvious potential flaw in it: Support for suppressing "racist" speech was flat or declined slightly over the years, as the author acknowledged.  What was not addressed was the possibility (some might say likelihood) that the progressive definition of what is "racist" speech has also expanded greatly over the years.

I note also that nationalist and antifeminist were not among the categories of speech surveyed (I don't think "militarist" sweeps in "nationalist" here), at least not in that article or the data it presented.

This is Heather MacDonald.   It’s not Ann Coulter or Milo, or for that matter even Michael Moore or Shaun King on the left.   But this sort of crap makes people like that more relevant.

These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.   Mobs are the one thing a free and open society cannot tolerate.  A mob has an IQ equal to the lowest one in the group divided by the number of people in the group.

At some point someone in Congress and/or the various state legislatures simply needs to put their foot down.   Campuses that see one dime of state/federal money:  you will protect free speech rights across the board.   You will not allow mob rule to hold sway.

To empower them, we need laws prohibiting the intentional disruption of speakers.  Federal is better, state if necessary.   Organizing such is conspiracy.  Then support the college with state troopers/US marshalls/whatever.

The governments and colleges need to deal with this.   Because if they don’t, sooner or later the targets will, and that will be nasty and tragic.   

I really wish I was kidding.


You guys act like protesting on college campuses is some new thing.  It's not, and it's arguably not even as extreme today as it once was.  The difference today is only that these protests are all now conveniently packaged as the insidious result of a PC culture out of control.   

And there is definitely some thick irony in promoting laws to block people from protesting others, while complaining about others trying to block free speech and expression.  Calling them mobs is disingenuous.  I guess you think more kids should've been shot at Kent State during that PC mob?

Offline YABO713

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #876 on: March 12, 2018, 03:53:12 PM »
The Berkeley protests of the 60s and 70s were to PROTECT free speech...

Offline David

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #877 on: March 12, 2018, 03:57:01 PM »
So is Heather MacDonald some fiery provocateur invited "to speaking invitations that appear to have been constructed primarily for the purpose of attracting hecklers?"

The Campus Victim Cult

https://www.city-journal.org/html/campus-victim-cult-15644.html

The day before I was slated to speak at Claremont McKenna College last April, I got one of those red-flagged “urgent” e-mails from an administrator. She explained that the college had picked up word of a brewing protest, and was considering moving the event to a building with fewer plate-glass windows and better means of egress. This was not exactly reassuring.

After hearing no additional news about a potential disruption, the administration decided to keep the event in the original building, the Athenaeum. But by the time I arrived, a massive mob of protesters had gathered, so a police escort brought me into the building through a secret passageway.

The auditorium was almost completely empty. Some 300 students had blockaded the building, making mincemeat of the police barricades that had been set up to keep the entrances open. The police simply stood down, as is too often true in our Black Lives Matter era. They didn’t want to offend the students, and they certainly didn’t want to be caught on video using force.

But what was most disconcerting was the fact that the few people who were in the room were transfixed by what was happening outside. Students were shouting and pounding on the plate-glass windows. The lectern had been moved, before the speech, away from the windows, so that when the lights went on inside, I would not be visible to the mob outside.

I took two questions via livestreaming, and at that point the police decided that they could no longer guarantee my safety. They quickly devised an escape plan: I was hustled through the kitchen and into a waiting police van, and sped away to the Claremont Police Department.

The incident was not the high point of open-mindedness in academic history.


======================

Also, without access to the underlying data Vox was using, I could see one obvious potential flaw in it: Support for suppressing "racist" speech was flat or declined slightly over the years, as the author acknowledged.  What was not addressed was the possibility (some might say likelihood) that the progressive definition of what is "racist" speech has also expanded greatly over the years.

I note also that nationalist and antifeminist were not among the categories of speech surveyed (I don't think "militarist" sweeps in "nationalist" here), at least not in that article or the data it presented.

This is Heather MacDonald.   It’s not Ann Coulter or Milo, or for that matter even Michael Moore or Shaun King on the left.   But this sort of crap makes people like that more relevant.

These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.   Mobs are the one thing a free and open society cannot tolerate.  A mob has an IQ equal to the lowest one in the group divided by the number of people in the group.

At some point someone in Congress and/or the various state legislatures simply needs to put their foot down.   Campuses that see one dime of state/federal money:  you will protect free speech rights across the board.   You will not allow mob rule to hold sway.

To empower them, we need laws prohibiting the intentional disruption of speakers.  Federal is better, state if necessary.   Organizing such is conspiracy.  Then support the college with state troopers/US marshalls/whatever.

The governments and colleges need to deal with this.   Because if they don’t, sooner or later the targets will, and that will be nasty and tragic.   

I really wish I was kidding.


You guys act like protesting on college campuses is some new thing.  It's not, and it's arguably not even as extreme today as it once was.  The difference today is only that these protests are all now conveniently packaged as the insidious result of a PC culture out of control.   

And there is definitely some thick irony in promoting laws to block people from protesting others, while complaining about others trying to block free speech and expression.  Calling them mobs is disingenuous.  I guess you think more kids should've been shot at Kent State during that PC mob?

Truthpaste.

Offline taestell

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #878 on: March 12, 2018, 04:45:24 PM »
These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.

What makes it a mob? Remember that Congress shall make no law abridging the right of the people to assemble.

The key word you omitted answers this question, IMO. "Peaceably." Many of the counter protests often found on college campuses in the wake of a conservative speaker don't comply with that prerequisite. Many of the now-common tactics like blocking interstate highways and marching down streets without doing the little bit of paperwork needed ahead of time don't, either.

When have college students ever blocked a freeway to protest someone speaking on campus?

Offline jonoh81

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #879 on: March 12, 2018, 05:41:40 PM »
The Berkeley protests of the 60s and 70s were to PROTECT free speech...

"Our protests were different!" 

I remember watching a video interviewing people in Ohio after Kent State.  A surprising number basically said that the students had it coming for protesting the way they did.  One's definition of "mob" is the only difference between that and what you're arguing now. 

And for the record, protesting someone's views is not actually the same as being anti-free speech, as the right to free speech does not come with a guarantee that no one will ever disagree, or that it will never have consequences. 

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #880 on: March 13, 2018, 11:29:24 AM »
And for the record, protesting someone's views is not actually the same as being anti-free speech, as the right to free speech does not come with a guarantee that no one will ever disagree, or that it will never have consequences.

What is happening on campuses (and in many PC-infested corporations) now is not mere "disagreement."

Offline DarkandStormy

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #881 on: March 13, 2018, 11:35:00 AM »
^

The alarm about student protesters, in other words, though not always mistaken about particular cases, is generally grounded in a completely mistaken view of the big-picture state of American society and public opinion, both on and off campus.



This apparently needs said every day.

Offline Ram23

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #882 on: March 13, 2018, 11:41:22 AM »
These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.

What makes it a mob? Remember that Congress shall make no law abridging the right of the people to assemble.

The key word you omitted answers this question, IMO. "Peaceably." Many of the counter protests often found on college campuses in the wake of a conservative speaker don't comply with that prerequisite. Many of the now-common tactics like blocking interstate highways and marching down streets without doing the little bit of paperwork needed ahead of time don't, either.

When have college students ever blocked a freeway to protest someone speaking on campus?

I didn't imply that they ever have. Those were two different sentences (I put " ,either" at the end to clarify the difference). The first sentence references clearly non-peaceful college campus protests like this one (a dime a dozen):

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-berkeley-protest-shapiro-20170914-htmlstory.html

The second sentence references any of the hundreds(or even thousands) of protests that have shut down freeways and streets, illegally. I don't think I need to link to any as they are so commonplace everyone should know what we're talking about. Multiple took place right in Cincinnati in recent years. I don't consider these types of protests peaceful, either - they fit the definition of what is colloquially known as "disturbing the peace." They legally fit that definition in many places, too.

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #883 on: March 13, 2018, 11:43:42 AM »
These aren’t protests.  These are mobs.

What makes it a mob? Remember that Congress shall make no law abridging the right of the people to assemble.

The key word you omitted answers this question, IMO. "Peaceably." Many of the counter protests often found on college campuses in the wake of a conservative speaker don't comply with that prerequisite. Many of the now-common tactics like blocking interstate highways and marching down streets without doing the little bit of paperwork needed ahead of time don't, either.

When have college students ever blocked a freeway to protest someone speaking on campus?

I didn't imply that they ever have. Those were two different sentences (I put " ,either" at the end to clarify the difference). The first sentence references clearly non-peaceful college campus protests like this one (a dime a dozen):

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-berkeley-protest-shapiro-20170914-htmlstory.html

The second sentence references any of the hundreds(or even thousands) of protests that have shut down freeways and streets, illegally. I don't think I need to link to any as they are so commonplace everyone should know what we're talking about. Multiple took place right in Cincinnati in recent years. I don't consider these types of protests peaceful, either - they fit the definition of what is colloquially known as "disturbing the peace." They legally fit that definition in many places, too.

Your contention is that if protesters break the law it is bad.  That means you are not a supporter of MLK or the civil rights movement.  Thanks for clearing that up.

Offline DarkandStormy

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #884 on: March 13, 2018, 12:00:26 PM »
Your contention is that if protesters break the law it is bad.  That means you are not a supporter of MLK or the civil rights movement.  Thanks for clearing that up.

The Underground Railroad was bad, actually...is a new take I wasn't expecting in 2018.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #885 on: March 13, 2018, 12:01:28 PM »
Protesting is protected. 

Attempting to shut down an event through violence or threat of same is unacceptable.

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #886 on: March 13, 2018, 12:03:52 PM »
Protesting is protected. 

Attempting to shut down an event through violence or threat of same is unacceptable.


Isn't speaking of creating a white ethno-state a threat of violence?  Therefore also unacceptable or is our moral outrage only selctive?

Offline taestell

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #887 on: March 13, 2018, 11:28:28 PM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

Offline mu2010

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #888 on: March 13, 2018, 11:37:30 PM »
Hint: no

Offline surfohio

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #889 on: March 14, 2018, 12:02:54 AM »
Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

That's hard to quantify. Maybe impossible. But (anecdotal alert) it's my experience that aversion to free speech has simply followed a pendulum shift over time, from right to left. I was always surprised at how institutionally ostracized persons with right wing viewpoints could be at liberal schools. 

Offline bumsquare

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #890 on: March 14, 2018, 12:13:32 AM »
The second sentence references any of the hundreds(or even thousands) of protests that have shut down freeways and streets, illegally. I don't think I need to link to any as they are so commonplace everyone should know what we're talking about.
😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

Offline Ram23

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #891 on: March 14, 2018, 09:39:15 AM »
^ Maybe I overestimated the crowd here:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=protest+shut+down+highway

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #892 on: March 14, 2018, 09:41:12 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #893 on: March 14, 2018, 10:46:50 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

So you should always believe data that contradicts what can be plainly seen with one's own eyes?

Who were the conservative speakers like Heather MacDonald and Christina Hoff Summers being heckled off campuses in the 1980s?

The refrain in this thread from has been a head-in-the-sand, hands-in-ears chant of "isolated incidents," "isolated incidents," when the stories just keep piling up.

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #894 on: March 14, 2018, 10:49:14 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

So you should always believe data that contradicts what can be plainly seen with one's own eyes?

Who were the conservative speakers like Heather MacDonald and Christina Hoff Summers being heckled off campuses in the 1980s?

The refrain in this thread from has been a head-in-the-sand, hands-in-ears chant of "isolated incidents," "isolated incidents," when the stories just keep piling up.

The plural of anecdote is not data. 

My neighbors and I think it's very cold, therefore, the data showing it warm in other places can't be accurate.

Offline freefourur

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #895 on: March 14, 2018, 10:53:35 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

So you should always believe data that contradicts what can be plainly seen with one's own eyes?

Who were the conservative speakers like Heather MacDonald and Christina Hoff Summers being heckled off campuses in the 1980s?

The refrain in this thread from has been a head-in-the-sand, hands-in-ears chant of "isolated incidents," "isolated incidents," when the stories just keep piling up.

I will once again be the one to provide hard data which will somehow be poo pooed but here it is:

The political tides turned
over the next few decades, to a point when in 1993~ United Nations
Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick was loudly heckled by a conservative group
called Students Against Intervention in EI Salvador.ll Similar right-wing
protests occurred in 1987 at the Harvard Law School, where a Nicaraguan
resistance leader was shouted off the stage as he was about to begin a
speech,12 and in 1994 at the University of South Florida, where a violent
demonstration resulted from the on-campus appearance of a Cuban exile
who advocated negotiations with Fidel Castro.13 E

https://scholarworks.law.ubalt.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1799&context=all_fac

But i guess it was conservatives doing the heckling back then so that is A- OK

Offline ck

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #896 on: March 14, 2018, 10:54:36 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

So you should always believe data that contradicts what can be plainly seen with one's own eyes?

Who were the conservative speakers like Heather MacDonald and Christina Hoff Summers being heckled off campuses in the 1980s?

The refrain in this thread from has been a head-in-the-sand, hands-in-ears chant of "isolated incidents," "isolated incidents," when the stories just keep piling up.

Gramarye, you surely know that you cannot objectively evaluate something as large as 'student opposition to opposing views' based on soundbites.  The media gets caught up in a cause of the day/month/year and every they start looking to report on it.  Soon enough, you are overwhelmed by stories of the things that have always been happening but only now being reported on.  It's simply an availability bias.

That's not to say it doesn't at times portend a larger truth, but in the absence of data to support it, you absolutely cannot trust 'your own eyes' because they see at a micro level and you are talking about a macro level movement.

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #897 on: March 14, 2018, 10:58:33 AM »
No one in this thread has presented any actual evidence that the amount of opposition from students to people with "unpopular" opinions (i.e., white supremacists, political or religious extremists) speaking on campus has increased over time. There has been some anecdotal evidence about an increase in protests in response to these speakers, but that could just be due to more media coverage of protests over time. Does anyone have any actual data showing that college students are becoming more closed minded, opposed to free speech, or "snowflakey" over time?

No.  The only data shown in this thread has supported the view that college are the same or more tolerant than the overall population and that hasn't changed much over the decades.  Obviously, those who want to believe something different have issues with that data but have none of their own. 

So you should always believe data that contradicts what can be plainly seen with one's own eyes?

Who were the conservative speakers like Heather MacDonald and Christina Hoff Summers being heckled off campuses in the 1980s?

The refrain in this thread from has been a head-in-the-sand, hands-in-ears chant of "isolated incidents," "isolated incidents," when the stories just keep piling up.

The plural of anecdote is not data. 

My neighbors and I think it's very cold, therefore, the data showing it warm in other places can't be accurate.

No, but if a hundred of your neighbors think it's cold and you think it's warm, their views are not just anecdotes that can be casually dismissed as "anecdotes."

Should I casually dismiss school shootings as isolated incidents and anecdotes as long as there are only a few every month?

Offline DarkandStormy

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #898 on: March 14, 2018, 11:24:37 AM »
Should I casually dismiss school shootings as isolated incidents and anecdotes as long as there are only a few every month?

If that's how you want to put your head in the sand and avoid the overwhelming data and facts we have presented in the other thread....I'm not sure what purposes it serves.

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Political Correctness
« Reply #899 on: March 14, 2018, 11:34:59 AM »
I think this article might sum up at least some of the problems I perceive with that data--why I basically perceive it as lying via statistics, to be perfectly frank.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/03/a-new-campus-survey-reveals-just-how-students-are-unlearning-liberty/

Last October, for example, Yale’s William F. Buckley Jr. program released the results of a survey of 800 college students that showed 83 percent believed the First Amendment should be “followed and respected.” A whopping 93 percent said there was value in listening to “views and opinions that I may disagree with.”

Good news, right? Not so fast. It turns out that 58 percent of students said colleges should “forbid” speakers “who have a history of engaging in hate speech,” with hate speech defined as “anything one particular person believes is harmful, racist, or bigoted.” Oh, and almost 40 percent believed it was sometimes acceptable to shout down or disrupt a speaker.

On Sunday, Gallup and the Knight Foundation released the results of a new survey of 3,014 college students. On the one hand, its results were sadly familiar. An overwhelming majority (89 percent) said it was “extremely” or “very” important to protect citizens’ free-speech rights, but a full 64 percent said the First Amendment shouldn’t protect so-called hate speech. A strong majority (60 percent) supported restricting even costumes that “stereotype certain racial or ethnic groups.” Almost half of students supported establishing speech codes, and 61 percent said the “climate on my campus prevents some people from saying things they believe because others might find them offensive.”