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Author Topic: Traffic Calming and Road Diets  (Read 235 times)

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Offline KJP

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Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« on: December 28, 2016, 06:24:13 AM »
Tim Davis @kettlemoraine
Carmel, Ind., has ~100 roundabouts, more than any other U.S. city. #Traffic injuries have decreased by 80% since they were installed.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2017, 07:27:55 PM by taestell »
America will never be destroyed from the outside. -- Abraham Lincoln.

Offline KJP

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Re: Traffic calming
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2017, 01:11:25 PM »
8 Transportation Engineering Euphemisms That Should Be Tossed Out
By Angie Schmitt   Jan 17, 2017

Have you ever gone to a public meeting about a street in your neighborhood, only to be told that your ideas to calm traffic would result in a “level of service” that would be “unacceptable”? Or that an “alternative transportation” option like a bike lane would render the street “capacity deficient”?

Those terms originated in the mid-century highway era, and they remain baked into transportation engineering to this day. There is a whole specialized vocabulary tilted against street design concepts that can improve health, safety, and street life. Ian Lockwood, a transportation engineer and consultant, says it’s time to leave these phrases behind.

MORE:
http://usa.streetsblog.org/2017/01/17/8-transportation-engineering-euphemisms-that-should-be-tossed-out/
America will never be destroyed from the outside. -- Abraham Lincoln.

Offline 327

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Re: Traffic calming
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2017, 03:09:03 PM »
Banning words won't fix anything.  It sounds like the issue is with capacity analysis.  To put it mildly Lockwood thinks the standards for that should change, which is a reasonable position to take, but you can't use magic vocabulary to make the opposing position, or the entire issue, disappear. 

In the cartoon at the top of that article, the city planner is trying to eliminate a big setback and he's the bad guy because that's "a disaster" for residents.  Gotta have that yard.  Then the article suggests we can make neighborhoods more walkable by making cars sit at traffic lights longer. 

The issue for pedestrians isn't the street or the cars or the lights, because they rarely interact with those.  Setbacks, however, are an issue.  Pedestrians care about what's between the intersections, what's along the streets, whether it's worth walking to.  If low density and single-use planning forces them to drive, they'll drive.  Making them drive slower won't change that.  It can't. 

Design the built environment for pedestrians and you've solved walkability.  Build mass transit and you've solved traffic, plus you've enhanced walkability.  Walkability has nothing to do with speed limits or lights or lanes, it is a need independent from the need for cars to move efficiently.  Both can and should happen at the same time.  This is not a zero sum game.

Offline taestell

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2017, 07:35:49 PM »
I'm always pleasantly surprised when I'm looking at various Ohio cities on Google Street View and notice that they have implemented road diets. Most recently I noticed that Lima has implemented them on several streets, removing a traffic lane and adding angled parking and/or bike lanes. It also just makes me sad that we can't do them in Cincinnati because our current Mayor and Dept. of Transportation don't understand them...

Online BigDipper 80

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2017, 07:42:40 PM »
Dayton's been doing a great job with road diets recently. They just finished narrowing Fifth Street between Wayne and Keowee, Brown Street now has bike lanes along it (although it's inexplicably still 35 when it should really be 25-30 now), and downtown has a lot of bike lanes that help compliment the region's incredibly robust bike trail network. It's been nice seeing so much proactive work from a smaller rust belt city.

Offline jjakucyk

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2017, 08:19:05 PM »
Dayton has it a bit easier than many cities with nearly 50% population loss and excessively wide streets to begin with.  They could go for full on Dutch/Danish cycletracks if they really wanted to. 

Online BigDipper 80

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2017, 09:08:01 PM »
Yeah there really aren't too many traffic bottlenecks anywhere where a cyclist would realistically be here, and half the time you don't even need the bike lanes downtown because you have the whole street to yourself. But I've been very impressed with the amount of people who actually get around by bike here, I always see people commuting around on the Link bikes or even just recreationally on the trails along the Miami.

Offline KJP

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2017, 06:02:56 PM »
America will never be destroyed from the outside. -- Abraham Lincoln.

Online jwulsin

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2017, 09:18:17 PM »
^Good stuff... wish the folks at Cincinnati's DOTE had more appetite for road narrowing.

Online BigDipper 80

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2017, 09:50:42 PM »
^ As I mentioned earlier (kinda), Dayton’s been doing a phenomenal job with road diets and bump outs in the core of the city. Of course, as was also mentioned, traffic really isn’t an issue in Dayton which makes things easier, but it’s good to see that they’re doing the right thing and actually narrowing roads when they rebuild them.

Offline Foraker

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Re: Traffic Calming and Road Diets
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2017, 11:39:47 AM »
NARROW ROADS ARE BETTER THAN CROSSWALKS
https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2015/8/20/narrow-roads-are-better-than-crosswalks

I was watching a whole crowd of Clinic employees cross the new E105 at Carnegie today -- wow, talk about a wide stretch of road to cross.  No wonder the new parking garage is getting an elevated walkway to keep those Clinic employees off the street.  Is that what we're going to get for the rest of the Opportunity Corridor?