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Author Topic: Columbus: Historic Preservation  (Read 753 times)

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Offline noozer

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Columbus: Historic Preservation
« on: December 06, 2008, 07:28:21 AM »
Architecture
1940 home influenced by Wright in danger
Saturday,  December 6, 2008 2:58 AM
By Jeffrey Sheban
The Columbus Dispatch

Preservationists are racing to save an important example of Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired architecture on the Far East Side.

A commercial developer has made an offer for the secluded house at 7495 E. Broad St. in the Blacklick neighborhood -- which has been for sale for three years and vacant for two.

jsheban@dispatch.com

http://dispatch.com/live/content/life/stories/2008/12/06/1A_BLACKLICK_HOUSE.ART_ART_12-06-08_D1_QDC554J.html?sid=101
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 02:54:42 PM by Columbo »

Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2008, 09:30:09 AM »
I haven't seen this particular house by architect Van Fossen.  But I do know of the more famous Rush Creek development he designed in Worthington.  Columbus Landmarks Foundation had a guided tour of the Rush Creek homes a few years ago. 

Both Rush Creek and this East Broad house are hidden gems.  Quite literally hidden because they are so well integrated with the landscape that they are difficult to find.  They are modest yet beautiful places to live.  The Rush Creek homes are based on the 1950's Usonian-type Wright designs.  This East Broad home looks to be more influenced by Fallingwater given its 1940's vintage.
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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2008, 12:15:57 PM »
Link to the Columbus Landmarks website about the Gunning House:
http://www.columbuslandmarks.org/preservation/gunning.php

The website also contains additional photos and history on the house.





Also a 28-photo tour of the house and property:
http://www.columbuslandmarks.org/preservation/gunninghouse_tour.pdf
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Offline Columbusite

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2008, 12:59:28 PM »
If the Firestone mansion in gentrifying, preservation-minded Olde Towne East didn't stand a chance, I don't think this one out in disposable sprawl land will either.

Offline mrnyc

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2008, 01:20:34 PM »
what a cool home & setting. that would be a suburban treasure most anywhere else. a shame.

it's going for cheap so hopefully somebody looking for a labor of love will pick it up. who knows? its a buyers market these days. keep us posted.

Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2014, 01:34:51 PM »
Hopeful update about this from CU.  Lots of lots of photos at the link:



The Gunning House Removed From Most Endangered Buildings List
By Anne Evans, Columbus Underground
June 25, 2014 - 7:45 am


The Gunning House, also known as Glenbrow, can finally be removed from the list of Ohioís Most Endangered Historic Sites, assembled by Preservation Ohio.  The home has been on the list since 2009.  Last week, the new owners, Dorri Steinhoff and Joe Kuspan closed on the property at a purchase price of $185,000.  Less than the 2008 asking price of $275,000.  Most recently, as a commercial property, the listed price was $297,500.
(. . .)
The 2,144 square-foot home had not been inhabited since 2005 and had languished on the market.  After the death of the homeís owner in 2012, the home was taken off the market and became ensnared in estate issues.  Then it was being offered as a commercial sale of the property which would most certainly mean demolition and the loss of an historic piece of architecture.
(. . .)
Now, the plan is for the home to be the personal residence of Steinhoff and Kuspan and their two children.  The goal is to move in by Summer of 2016.  It is certainly an ambitious goal and a huge undertaking, but fitting for this couple, who enjoy taking properties that have become a shadow of their former selves and restoring them to luster.

MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/the-gunning-house-removed-from-most-endangered-buildings-list
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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2017, 06:31:20 PM »


114-year-old downtown office building recommended for National Register of Historic Places
By Evan Weese, Staff Reporter - Columbus Business First
September 27, 2016, 4:38pm EDT


A 114-year-old office building in downtown Columbus is being recommended to the National Register of Historic Places.  The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board has voted to recognize the Del Monte building at 341-345 S. Third St. for its local significance.

It was built in 1902 at the northwest corner of Third and Mound streets. ... Originally an 18-unit apartment complex, the three-story building now is used for executive and attorneys' offices.

MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2016/09/27/114-year-old-downtown-office-building-recommended.html
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Offline Arcade Fiyah

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2017, 03:05:50 PM »
93-year-old downtown building nominated for National Register of Historic Places



A 93-year-old building just off Capitol Square may be added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The eight-story Empire Building at 150 E. Broad St. has been nominated for the sought-after designation by the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board.

More below:
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2017/03/28/93-year-old-downtown-building-nominated-for.html
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Offline Arcade Fiyah

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2017, 12:41:03 PM »
Dispatch building, Franklinton Engine House land state historic tax credits

Renovation projects to restore two historic buildings in Columbus are among the latest recipients of Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

The Ohio Development Services Agency on Wednesday announced $35 million in credits awarded to 30 applicants around the state, including projects to restore the former home of The Columbus Dispatch on Capitol Square and the Engine House No. 6 on West Broad Street in Franklinton.

More below:
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2017/06/28/dispatch-building-franklinton-engine-house-land.html

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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2017, 02:11:16 PM »


Area south of Ohio State pursues historic designation
By Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch
Updated: October 6, 2017 at 6:11 AM


A new townhouse development on King Avenue is a key reason that David Murchie became part of an effort to create Columbusí 19th historic district.  Many in the neighborhood, just south of the University District, opposed the 48-unit, $10 million development, marketed to students.  Neighbors said it was too dense and detracted from the neighborhood of single-family brick homes, many dating to the 19th century.

The area is west of North High Street, which is undergoing a building boom, and southeast of Ohio Stateís growing Wexner Medical Center.  The historic district would include three neighborhoods: Dennison Place, The Circles and NECKO: the Neil-Eighth-Cannon-King Organization.

Murchie and others began discussing a historic district, which helps protect neighborhoods by requiring approval of exterior renovations and new projects in addition to demolitions. ... The group plans to gather signatures of property owners in those areas, hoping to persuade at least 75 percent of them to support a district.  That would help persuade the Historic Resources Commission, and then the Columbus City Council, to support it.

The proposed districtís oldest homes, near High Street, date to 1875, and the newer ones were built in the 1920s.  The Circles neighborhood was platted about 1890 as an exclusive community.  The property was owned by Anne Neil Dennison, the daughter of wealthy businessman William Neil.  His farm later became the Ohio State University campus.  She was the wife of a former governor of Ohio, William Dennison Jr.  One name being considered for the district: the McMillen-Dennison Historic District, named for William Neilís two daughters, Anne Neil Dennison and Elizabeth J. McMillen.

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171005/area-south-of-ohio-state-pursues-historic-designation
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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 03:18:09 PM »


The Frank Lloyd Wright inspired Gunning House, also know as Glenbrow, has been restored by local couple Joe Kuspan and Dorri Steinhoff.  The formerly endangered 2,144 square-foot home was built in 1940 with walls of sandstone that had been quarried on-site.

The Glenbrow / Gunning House was designed by Tony Smith, an apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright, along with Laurence Cuneo and Theodore van Fossen (who later went on to design 48 Wrightian-inspired homes in the Rush Creek Village neighborhood of Worthington - separate thread about this at https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,10046.0.html).

CU has an extensive photo thread of the restored home at the link below:

http://www.columbusunderground.com/home-tour-historic-glenbrow-home-revived





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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2018, 11:56:44 AM »
Another article about the restoration of the Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired house on the far East Side purchased by Dorri Steinhoff and her husband, Joe Kuspan, a Columbus architect.  Steinhoff and Kuspan were recognized for their efforts when they received the 2018 Outstanding Persons Award from Columbus Landmarks, which in 2014 had included the Gunning House on its first list of endangered properties:

http://www.dispatch.com/entertainmentlife/20180513/couple-rehab-architecturally-important-reynoldsburg-house-labeled-at-risk-in-2014



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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2018, 12:19:00 PM »


http://www.dispatch.com/entertainmentlife/20180514/palace-theatre-closes-for-renovation

The Palace Theatre is closed until November while the historic venue undergoes $6.5 million in renovations.  The main-hall makeover will include repair of damaged plaster, new paint, installation of new first-floor seats and the cleaning, repainting and reupholstering of balcony seats.  The project will reduce theater capacity from 2,837 to 2,691.

The Palace Theatre opened at 34 W. Broad Street in 1926 and operated as a movie theater until 1975.  It reopened as a multi-purpose concert venue in 1980, after theater owner (and owner of the adjacent LeVeque Tower) Katherine LeVeque invested $3 million into the venue.  LeVeque gave the theater to the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) in 1989.

This historic downtown movie house is only surpassed by the even more ornate Ohio Theatre that opened in 1928 one block south at 55 E. State Street and is also owned and operated by CAPA.  Below is a video showing the existing interior conditions prior to this $6.5 million renovation project:

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Offline Columbo

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Re: Columbus: Historic Preservation
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2018, 10:39:53 AM »


Another couple of articles (along with a much brighter interior photo) about the Palace Theatre renovation.  The Columbus Navigator article focuses on one aspect of the renovation - the replacement of all the main floor seating.  The big (so to speak) reason for the seat replacement is that 21st-century Americans are larger than our 1920ís ancestors.  This impacts customer comfort - and they've got the Yelp reviews to prove it:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/palace-theatre-closing-for-six-months-of-renovations-tm1

https://www.columbusnavigator.com/palace-theatre-renovations/
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