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Ohio Discussion => City Discussion => Topic started by: ryanlammi on September 03, 2013, 03:46:09 PM

Title: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ryanlammi on September 03, 2013, 03:46:09 PM
Courthouse wants homeless moved (http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130903/NEWS/309030031/Courthouse-wants-homeless-moved)

via the Cincinnati Enquirer

Quote
Thousands of people walk through the doors of the Hamilton County Courthouse every weekday morning: Jurors, defendants, lawyers and judges, all on court business.

But overnight, the courthouse plaza becomes Cincinnati’s de facto homeless camp.

That’s about to end. Hamilton County’s Sheriff’s Major Charmaine McGuffey told The Enquirer that deputies will soon evict the squatters – who defecate and urinate on the courthouse plaza.

“We don’t want to get mired down in too much political debate,” she said. “It’s a public health hazard.”

The article is actually pretty lengthy. It seems like better enforcement to keep people from relieving themselves on the grounds and actually using the restroom provided would suffice.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: northsider on September 03, 2013, 08:56:46 PM
Interesting that the article says that Hamilton County has about 750 homeless any given night, with about 700 of them sleeping in shelters and the rest in places like the courthouse.  I'm glad to see that they're going to hire another street outreach worker to get through to these guys, but some of them can't go to the Drop Inn Center because of past issues... what's the long-term solution here? :/
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Jimmy Skinner on September 04, 2013, 09:12:29 AM
Seems like there needs to be a last resort shelter that can take the worst of the worst.  If the Drop Inn Center cannot accept those with sexual assualt records, then they end up sleeping on the courthouse steps. 

Some of these guys are required to register with the Sheriff and when you look at their records online you will see that they even list the courthouse as their residence.  Sometimes it will even say "alley behind courthouse" or some similar place, because they have no legal place to stay.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: TheCOV on September 04, 2013, 10:00:19 AM
The taxpayers shouldn't have to tolerate people that are so disrespectful that they would urinate in the entrance of a building on a regular basis.  It's just gross, and I have always been shocked at how many years this has been going on.
I applauded the approach they want to take here.  I hope they find success.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: seicer on September 04, 2013, 11:54:44 AM
No one wants to donate money to or fund a shelter that accepts those that are pretty much at the bottom of the barrel. Those with sexual assault records or other horrific records are generally barred from many shelters, and there are also those who just refuse to go to a shelter because of the rules. Which are pretty lenient to begin with. There really isn't a good solution.

When I lived in OTR just a block from the courthouse, I purposely avoided walking through the courthouse area and along Court Street because of the aggressive panhandling, some mugging incidents (not me, but of several friends) and general lawlessness in that part of downtown at night. It made me and my girlfriend at the time very nervous and with good reason.

So what do you do? Some cities have banned homelessness in certain areas - and those caught are cited, arrested and so forth which really doesn't solve the issue. It just puts them in taxpayer supported jails that offer no treatment options or a way out. Others bus them back to where they came from (e.g. some cities shipped their homeless to Cincinnati for years - and some still do). Others clear them out and force them to move onward.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: joshknut on April 13, 2018, 10:55:11 AM
This morning on 3rd street around FWW and the area under the overpass (where the redbike station is) there was a much larger than normal number of homeless people. I've lived down on 4th street for the past 4 years and I have not seen something like this. Multiple tents were set up along the street and under the bridge. There was a police officer just standing there watching the group under the overpass. It really looked like the tent cities that have popped up in places like San Francisco. Is this just because it's warm? I have not seen this many people living there (or in tents) and there seemed to be a lot of new faces.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on April 13, 2018, 11:14:28 AM
This morning on 3rd street around FWW and the area under the overpass (where the redbike station is) there was a much larger than normal number of homeless people. I've lived down on 4th street for the past 4 years and I have not seen something like this. Multiple tents were set up along the street and under the bridge. There was a police officer just standing there watching the group under the overpass. It really looked like the tent cities that have popped up in places like San Francisco. Is this just because it's warm? I have not seen this many people living there (or in tents) and there seemed to be a lot of new faces.

It has progressively gotten worse the past couple months. But alot of people didnt realize that most of these folks were living in the Dunnhumby loading dock area of their old building prior to demolition. After the Bengals season wrapped up these folks took over the plum street tunnel. I know this past week for the first time in a long time co-workers cars were being broken into in the middle of the day in the monthly lot next door.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on April 13, 2018, 11:23:22 AM
I stood around for a bit and watched a tent go up on 3rd Street on Wednesday. A guy in an older F150 was unloading equipment, furniture, blankets, etc. and another guy was setting up his camp. I didn't see it start, but it looked like he had been driven there and dropped off. The truck had Kentucky plates.

There are always homeless hanging around under the overpasses, especially after the Drop Inn relocated to Gest Street - but I don't remember ever seeing this many tents set up in the 7 years I've worked on 3rd Street.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ucgrady on April 13, 2018, 11:46:46 AM
All the construction going on at the I-71 and I-471 overpasses near Eggleston and Mt. Adam's retaining wall has displaced a lot of the homeless that used to camp over there as well. I don't think the numbers are necessarily up, just that they are concentrated in a smaller area.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on April 13, 2018, 11:51:03 AM
It's embarrassing that the city lets them camp out on 3rd st.  The first thing anyone see's when coming into town off the highway is a bunch of homeless people?  Great way to try to attract people to downtown. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on April 13, 2018, 12:02:57 PM
It's embarrassing that the city lets them camp out on 3rd st.  The first thing anyone see's when coming into town off the highway is a bunch of fucking homeless people?  Great way to try to attract people to downtown. 

Well they started to remove the concrete benches and an advocacy group flipped out and created a nightmare and the city backed away from the homeless. Honestly the stretch where they put the smaller metal benches looks alot better than the area of long concrete benches they use to camp out around and on.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on April 13, 2018, 12:16:49 PM
Well there are homeless people in tents ALL OVER Los Angeles, and that place has no trouble attracting new business and residents.  But I agree that it's a problem, and seemingly a bigger one in that area than when the original Ft. Washington Way was there. 

The saddest moment was around 2007 when guys were living in tents in the pit where The Banks is now, approximately beneath the Orange Leaf. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: urbangiraffe on April 13, 2018, 12:30:27 PM
The underpass has now been cleared out completely and pressure washed. Guess that's why the officer was there this morning...
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on April 13, 2018, 03:27:02 PM
'Nobody is evicted:' Cincinnati scrubs tent city beneath I-71 overpass near Third Street (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/04/13/nobody-evicted-cincinnati-scrubs-tent-city-beneath-75-overpass-near-third-street/514385002/)

Workers removed torn sheets of cardboard, tarps, bottles filled with urine and other trash under the Interstate 71 overpass near Third Street Friday morning.

The dozens of homeless people living under that overpass in tents and makeshift shelters are expected to return.

Fridayís cleanup was supervised by the Cincinnati Police Department and the Hamilton County Sheriffís Office. City workers used a Bobcat, pressure washer and a city garbage truck to remove trash that the homeless were told three days ago to leave behind.

Police Capt. Michael Neville said residents of the downtown camp will likely return this evening.

Cont (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/04/13/nobody-evicted-cincinnati-scrubs-tent-city-beneath-75-overpass-near-third-street/514385002/)
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: The_Cincinnati_Kid on April 13, 2018, 04:03:36 PM
Nothing unique to Cincinnati.  The problem is crazy bad here on the west coast.  LA has tent cities on every bridge overpass for 5 miles or so on most highways out of downtown.  Seattle, Portland, SF, and even here in Salem we deal with the growing problem every day.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: YABO713 on April 13, 2018, 04:38:07 PM
Nothing unique to Cincinnati.  The problem is crazy bad here on the west coast.  LA has tent cities on every bridge overpass for 5 miles or so on most highways out of downtown.  Seattle, Portland, SF, and even here in Salem we deal with the growing problem every day.

Denver's homeless problem is IMMENSE.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Robuu on April 13, 2018, 04:56:17 PM
You can't just stop people from existing; they have to live somewhere. Homeless people want to live in a dense, urban area the same reason we do: a concentration of amenities, opportunities, and community.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: BigDipper 80 on April 13, 2018, 05:11:44 PM
Well there are homeless people in tents ALL OVER Los Angeles, and that place has no trouble attracting new business and residents.

I think a lot of "grass is greener" types see homeless camps in cities like Cincinnati or Detroit and it confirms their bias that "of course these places have lots of homeless people, these cities are poor and terrible; I can't wait to get away to a 'rich city' that isn't so broke" and don't stop to think that it's an even bigger problem in more successful coastal cities, especially the west coast where the climate makes living on the street moderately more tolerable, coupled with side effects of the housing crisis out there.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on April 13, 2018, 05:35:17 PM
You can't just stop people from existing; they have to live somewhere. Homeless people want to live in a dense, urban area the same reason we do: a concentration of amenities, opportunities, and community.

As well as access to a denser number of rubes as well as things to steal.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Robuu on April 13, 2018, 05:52:22 PM
You can't just stop people from existing; they have to live somewhere. Homeless people want to live in a dense, urban area the same reason we do: a concentration of amenities, opportunities, and community.

As well as access to a denser number of rubes as well as things to steal.

You're painting with too broad a brush, but for some people these may be considered amenities.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: 1400 Sycamore on April 13, 2018, 08:08:16 PM
This week's report:

I encounter a lot of homeless people. They all are from here. Now and then, someone comes to Cincinnati for the VA then stays. That's about it. They stay on the streets because they are drunk or addicted and can't be placed for housing because of it. Or, they are insane and wander about like zombies. Most of the homeless do not panhandle. The panhandlers are mostly not homeless and do not live in OTR. They come down to panhandle, get free food and clothes and steal stuff. This week there are about 10 homeless people camping at Salem United Church and Golden Gate. 100 yards from my front door. I see them all the time. No one has asked me or anyone I've seen for anything. Money, water, food, nothing.

Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on April 24, 2018, 11:48:17 AM
'Nobody is evicted:' Cincinnati scrubs tent city beneath I-71 overpass near Third Street (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/04/13/nobody-evicted-cincinnati-scrubs-tent-city-beneath-75-overpass-near-third-street/514385002/)

Workers removed torn sheets of cardboard, tarps, bottles filled with urine and other trash under the Interstate 71 overpass near Third Street Friday morning.

The dozens of homeless people living under that overpass in tents and makeshift shelters are expected to return.

Fridayís cleanup was supervised by the Cincinnati Police Department and the Hamilton County Sheriffís Office. City workers used a Bobcat, pressure washer and a city garbage truck to remove trash that the homeless were told three days ago to leave behind.

Police Capt. Michael Neville said residents of the downtown camp will likely return this evening.

Cont (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/04/13/nobody-evicted-cincinnati-scrubs-tent-city-beneath-75-overpass-near-third-street/514385002/)

While Cincinnati continues to enable the drug and alcohol abuse taking place in this growing tent city, places like San Fransisco have started taking a better approach - Cincinnati could learn something from this:

San Francisco mayor taking hard line approach to city's homeless

http://www.ktvu.com/news/san-francisco-mayor-taking-hard-line-approach-to-citys-homeless

There have been sweeps before but campers returned days later or simply moved a few blocks away. 
The mayor says this time will be different.  This week, city crisis teams will be reaching out to homeless people in this neighborhood trying to get them into a shelter program.

Those who refuse help -- will have their tents cleared out this week. 

The mayor told the San Francisco Chronicle that the city has gone from being compassionate toward homeless people to enabling them.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 11, 2018, 06:51:16 PM
The 3rd Street Tent City is now costing downtown jobs and businesses. It's really exploded over the past month or two - it now occupies the entirety of the Plum Street underpass and several blocks of 3rd Street east from there:

Downtown residents, businesses concerned about homeless camp

https://local12.com/news/local/downtown-residents-businesses-concerned-about-homeless-camp

According to a study for Downtown Cincinnati, Inc., two potential tenants for a nearby office tower said they were either not interested or did not return calls because of the homeless camp.

Other business which are thinking of expanding down there are now also looking at Northern Kentucky. Thatís about 500-700 jobs.

Downtown's negative? The camp.


Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 11, 2018, 09:04:57 PM
I know every city differs but when I was in Columbus I noticed very few homeless downtown... but in cincy you have whole tent cities and streets filled with them. Where the heck are they all coming from?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: edale on July 11, 2018, 09:15:30 PM
I wonder if this springís floods forced a lot of the homeless out of the riverfront camps and into downtown.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 11, 2018, 09:29:28 PM
Thatís a possibility. Most of the pan handlers Iíve encountered are fine folks, and donít bother you...but some of them truly take things to far. Iíve seen them stalk pedestrians and yell for money.

You see the cop sirens in that area a lot as well for whateverís reason to. I see them a lot when I go down to the banks at night.

Itís a tricky situation for sure, and I have sympathy for those that are effected, but that said itís a very visible part of our downtown and creates a horrible look for our city. It makes it seem like cincy is a 3rd world country of sorts, and Iím sure this effects some people in wanting to visit or even live downtown.

They need to be relocated in my opinion.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: BigDipper 80 on July 11, 2018, 09:34:02 PM
I'm not saying this as an excuse, but it's interesting that businesses are willing to overlook the rampant homelessness in places like San Francisco, but cite it as a reason to not even look at a downtown office in Cincinnati. I'd guess that it's easier to look the other way when you have the ridiculous economic resources of the Bay Area to power your business.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ColDayMan on July 11, 2018, 11:08:55 PM
I'm not saying this as an excuse, but it's interesting that businesses are willing to overlook the rampant homelessness in places like San Francisco, but cite it as a reason to not even look at a downtown office in Cincinnati. I'd guess that it's easier to look the other way when you have the ridiculous economic resources of the Bay Area to power your business.

Hell, the whole western US.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: IAGuy39 on July 12, 2018, 12:36:36 AM
Idk if I mentioned it before but the last few times Iíve been to fountain square Iíve been aggressively panhandled. One of the times I was with my aunt and the other two with my fiancť.

Iím certain as some say it isnít the biggest deal and for me personally I donít mind too much. But when I was with my aunt the person called us ďf*****g b*****sĒ and the other two times they came up to my fiancť and I taking pictures at the Fountain with an elaborate story and they just wanted us to walk with them to the ATM to pull a few dollars out and blah blah blah after I shut them down three times before.

In my opinion that is getting out of line. The city has put too much money and resources into downtown to have these aggressive panhandlers running up to you for cash when you are trying to enjoy the fountain. Personally, when that is going on I wouldnít feel 100% safe with my fiancť down there alone by herself and I am certain a lot of people feel that way especially woman. They need to get it figured out.

It may be different if there are tons of people around but there isnít all the time in Fountain Square. I think maybe thatís why it makes a difference in San Fran because there are hordes of other people around.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: JYP on July 12, 2018, 08:06:24 AM
In most larger cities for better or worse, the panhandling population is constantly ignored as they just become part of the background.

In Cincinnati and similarly sized cities, panhandlers often times are more empowered by sympathetic suburbanites who end up giving them cash because they don't know any better. This happens in larger cities but to a smaller success rate so they are not as encouraged.

At any rate, it's better to give to a social service agency than to give to a panhandler. But most suburbanites don't know this, and they get taken advantage of more often.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 12, 2018, 08:20:15 AM
They 100% need to be moved out of 3rd street.  In no way should they be allowed to live in such a prominent location. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on July 12, 2018, 09:05:02 AM
I work over by Plum and Third and its a real big issue at the moment. We have all been notified of two sex offenders now living in the tunnel. I have numerous female co-workers freaked out about walking to there cars by themselves now or even staying at work late. The tunnel situation has also gotten out of hand, there is couches, mattresses, a propane grill, lawn chairs. On top of all the tents they have everywhere in there. The stench of urine in the surrounding area is so bad it makes you want to gag. They defecate in between vehicles which is a whole other fun issue to walk to your vehicle in the evening. I know the police/fire department have been called almost twice a week for the past couple months because of overdosing in the tunnel as well.
Id like to see Josh Spring actually do something worth while and move these folks or convince them to move into shelters and programs. He is always there to create headaches for everyone else, but i have yet to see him solve existing problems...
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 12, 2018, 09:36:54 AM
Are we SF of the mid west in terms of homeless population versus our current city size? For instance I know Chicago probably have more homeless but they are also a larger city. For the size of Cincy and the amount of homeless Iíve seen and the amount of camps it makes you think we have probably the higher homeless ratio for a city of our size.

Again, itís weird. Cost of living in cincy is one of the lowest in the us, our unemployment rate has been pretty low as well...Again, the heroin drug trade has been prevelant here but itís affected many other cities as well. Iím just curious why cincy is becoming a homeless hub, the sf of the Midwest.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Robuu on July 12, 2018, 09:43:17 AM
It's crazy how many abandoned housing units there are in the city, but people need to set up camp in the streets.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 12, 2018, 09:53:03 AM
The problem is that they allow them to setup these camps.  SF finally got smart and has started cracking down on them.  They have started forcing their homeless to go to shelters where they can get help, and if they don't agree then they're forced out of their "home"
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 12, 2018, 09:53:11 AM
Honestly, and this might trigger some people (and thinking about the state of otr even 10 years ago),  but Iíd argue that south of liberty is now safer than portions of the cbd at night...and that blows my mind.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on July 12, 2018, 10:01:04 AM
Honestly, and this might trigger some people (and thinking about the state of otr even 10 years ago),  but Iíd argue that south of liberty is now safer than portions of the cbd at night...and that blows my mind.

No I would say this is an accurate observation right now. Couple of times had to do a second look over my shoulder because there are aggressive homeless that work in groups now at night.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 12, 2018, 10:05:51 AM
Honestly, and this might trigger some people (and thinking about the state of otr even 10 years ago),  but Iíd argue that south of liberty is now safer than portions of the cbd at night...and that blows my mind.
It makes sense.  That area has lots of foot traffic and more people on the street make the area safer.  OTR south of Liberty isn't a very big area whereas the CBD is.  There are parts of the CBD that are just as if not more safe the OTR south of Liberty but there are other areas that are completely dead.  Just a couple weeks ago I was walking home down Vine St and walked past someone clearly od'ing on the sidewalk between Court and 9th.  Their drug addict friend was on a cell probably trying to call 911 to get her resuscitated.  That stretch of Vine from Court to 8th is completely dead with barely any street lights.  And there are plenty of other dead parts of the CBD as well where homeless/addicts hangout and live. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 12, 2018, 10:21:45 AM
Honestly, and this might trigger some people (and thinking about the state of otr even 10 years ago),  but Iíd argue that south of liberty is now safer than portions of the cbd at night...and that blows my mind.
It makes sense.  That area has lots of foot traffic and more people on the street make the area safer.  OTR south of Liberty isn't a very big area whereas the CBD is.  There are parts of the CBD that are just as if not more safe the OTR south of Liberty but there are other areas that are completely dead.  Just a couple weeks ago I was walking home down Vine St and walked past someone clearly od'ing on the sidewalk between Court and 9th.  Their drug addict friend was on a cell probably trying to call 911 to get her resuscitated.  That stretch of Vine from Court to 8th is completely dead with barely any street lights.  And there are plenty of other dead parts of the CBD as well where homeless/addicts hangout and live.

Iím glad 3cdc will soon begin focusing less on otr and begin focusing more on the cbd. When you walk around otr (especially the revitalized areas) you feel like you are in a different city all together. There are shops on every corner, bars, restaurants, crowds of pedestrians. There is life on the streets.

Parts of CBD are a crumbling mess, and itís sort of shocking that it has gotten to this point. Dead streets, vacant store fronts, literally row of homeless camps. What the hell happened? Itís just extreme night and day between these 2 areas of the city. Extremely stark contrast.

Aside from 3cdc, no one else is really investing in the cbd. I donít get why. This has really hurt the cbd imo. Iím not sure why otr will have a flock of developers, but the cbd is the lonely step child that no one wants to talk to. Even the street car line has done more for revitalizing otr than it has for the cbd.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: IAGuy39 on July 12, 2018, 10:40:18 AM
I think a few things are looking up in the CBD:

1.) The new Kroger Tower

2.) The new Kimpton Hotel catty corner from Fountain Square (5th and Walnut)

3.) 4th and Race if that ever gets going.

I know it won't be enough but those three things, if hopefully #2 and #3 get moving quickly, will really help out those specific areas.

The 5th and Walnut area is going to really spruce up the immediate area and help out with hotel attendants outside waiting for customers to arrive. Now it's kind of a grimey area

The other one is 4th and Race, adding a bunch of new residents and filling in that massive hole is giong to do a lot.

After that the big one they need to figure out is the Macy's site.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jim uber on July 12, 2018, 10:49:08 AM
Aside from 3cdc, no one else is really investing in the cbd. I donít get why.
come on. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 11:00:29 AM
Aside from 3cdc, no one else is really investing in the cbd. I donít get why.
come on.

Yea, it's definitely not true. There are other people investing in the CBD right now. There was an article in the Business Courier today about buildings being redeveloped along Fourth Street. there are several projects starting to happen on Seventh as well. But it has definitely come slower than in OTR. One reason I think this is the case is because of the streets. OTR has narrow streets and trees. All the main streets in the CBD have been blown up into highways. No one wants to live on a highway, even if they are in a high rise. Road diets throughout the CBD, adding bike lanes and tree lawns, would go a long way toward spurring more investment.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: oakiehigh on July 12, 2018, 11:08:32 AM
I can't help to suspect their is an outside organization supplying these people with tents and guiding them where to place them for political reasons or to advance an agenda.    You very rarely seen these before and now they are cropping up in the most noticeable places.   There are now two tents on Findlay St under I-75.   Conveniently, this is the exit a lot of suburbanites from Southbound 75 take to go towards Findlay Market
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 12, 2018, 11:13:06 AM
Aside from 3cdc, no one else is really investing in the cbd. I donít get why.
come on.

Yea, it's definitely not true. There are other people investing in the CBD right now. There was an article in the Business Courier today about buildings being redeveloped along Fourth Street. there are several projects starting to happen on Seventh as well. But it has definitely come slower than in OTR. One reason I think this is the case is because of the streets. OTR has narrow streets and trees. All the main streets in the CBD have been blown up into highways. No one wants to live on a highway, even if they are in a high rise. Road diets throughout the CBD, adding bike lanes and tree lawns, would go a long way toward spurring more investment.
The streets in OTR are smaller then CBD because it's not downtown.  Downtowns streets are very standard for downtowns throughout the country.  I walk to and from work in downtown everyday and only 2nd and 3rd along with Central are comparable to highways.  Everything inbetween isn't anything close to a highway, cars can barely get over 30 mph before then inevitably hit a red light. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: IAGuy39 on July 12, 2018, 11:29:49 AM
Yeah and actually downtown Cincinnati streets are much tighter than most other Midwest cities.

Indianapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Des Moines, are super wide streets.

Minneapolis is a bit wider than Cincy but better than the above.

When I first went to downtown Indy I keep thinking I must be just outside downtown but I wasn't
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 01:23:36 PM
Aside from 3cdc, no one else is really investing in the cbd. I donít get why.
come on.

Yea, it's definitely not true. There are other people investing in the CBD right now. There was an article in the Business Courier today about buildings being redeveloped along Fourth Street. there are several projects starting to happen on Seventh as well. But it has definitely come slower than in OTR. One reason I think this is the case is because of the streets. OTR has narrow streets and trees. All the main streets in the CBD have been blown up into highways. No one wants to live on a highway, even if they are in a high rise. Road diets throughout the CBD, adding bike lanes and tree lawns, would go a long way toward spurring more investment.
The streets in OTR are smaller then CBD because it's not downtown.  Downtowns streets are very standard for downtowns throughout the country.  I walk to and from work in downtown everyday and only 2nd and 3rd along with Central are comparable to highways.  Everything inbetween isn't anything close to a highway, cars can barely get over 30 mph before then inevitably hit a red light.

I wouldn't call them standard. The desirable neighborhoods in the downtowns of cities throughout the country all have narrower streets. Go to downtown Boston or Philly and see that narrow streets can support many times the population that you have in Cincy. I live downtown and I can tell you that many more than just 2nd and 3rd are like highways. Seventh, Fifth east of Fountain Square, Ninth, parts of Race and Elm all feel like highways. There is no need for more than two or three lanes in one direction on a downtown street. Anything after that does nothing to increase capacity and just makes the street more unsafe as people switch lanes more and have to get all the way over to turn. And barely over 30 mph is really fast for a downtown street with so many lights. We should narrow the streets and time the lights to encourage people to travel no faster than 20 mph. They'll get to where they're going just as fast, burn less gas, and stop and start less. There's lots of research on this topic out there.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 01:28:01 PM
Yeah and actually downtown Cincinnati streets are much tighter than most other Midwest cities.

Indianapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Des Moines, are super wide streets.

Minneapolis is a bit wider than Cincy but better than the above.

When I first went to downtown Indy I keep thinking I must be just outside downtown but I wasn't

Correct, but I think Midwestern cities shouldn't be our model. We definitely don't want to model our downtown after Indy. Kansas City is an interesting one because they do have some ridiculously wide downtown streets but they also have some pretty narrow streets right downtown too. We've converted every east-west street downtown to a multi-lane, one way feeder to the highway. That's not a recipe for a strong residential downtown.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: GCrites80s on July 12, 2018, 01:46:46 PM
^Or for strong commercial either. Customer-facing businesses despise one-way streets.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 02:02:04 PM
^Exactly!
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: edale on July 12, 2018, 02:12:15 PM
I'm not saying this as an excuse, but it's interesting that businesses are willing to overlook the rampant homelessness in places like San Francisco, but cite it as a reason to not even look at a downtown office in Cincinnati. I'd guess that it's easier to look the other way when you have the ridiculous economic resources of the Bay Area to power your business.

In the case of San Francisco, unless a business was ready to leave the West Coast entirely, they couldn't really move to another urban location to avoid the homeless. Across the bay in Oakland, the homeless situation is just as bad. Same with LA, San Diego, Portland, and Seattle. It's just a part of life out here.

It is interesting to hear about this apparent spike in homelessness in Cincinnati, though. It's often claimed here in California that the high housing costs are directly related to the homeless population. But if a market with just about the lowest housing costs in the country is also experiencing a spike, it would seem to discredit this argument. In Cincy, I would bet any spike in homelessness could at least partially be blamed on the heroin/opioid epidemic. Cincinnati seems to be about ground zero for that stuff, so all the junkies who lose their jobs and housing in SW Ohio, and large parts of Kentucky and Indiana make their way to the streets of downtown Cincinnati. I also wonder about the demolition and relocation of the drop inn center, and if that has resulted in more homeless on the streets.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: edale on July 12, 2018, 02:19:10 PM
Street widths are absolutely not a problem in Downtown Cincinnati. There are a few stretches that need to be improved and narrowed, such as the aforementioned 2nd and 3rd on the riverfront, and 5th over by P&G, but most of Cincinnati has very narrow streets for a midwestern city. I think most Cincinnati streets feel about right sized downtown. Certainly better than the huge wide streets found in Cleveland or Detroit, or even the big wide streets of LA or San Diego. People are happy to live on Madison or Erie in Hyde Park and Oakley, both of which are busier and wider than most downtown streets. Hell, even the new residential building in Columbia Tusculum that is literally built adjacent to Columbia Parkway is a popular place to live, and they charge high rents! The problem with parts of downtown is the inactivity and the dead zones that are created by surface lots, parking garages, and institutional users (library, courthouse, etc.).
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 02:44:42 PM
Street widths are absolutely not a problem in Downtown Cincinnati. There are a few stretches that need to be improved and narrowed, such as the aforementioned 2nd and 3rd on the riverfront, and 5th over by P&G, but most of Cincinnati has very narrow streets for a midwestern city. I think most Cincinnati streets feel about right sized downtown. Certainly better than the huge wide streets found in Cleveland or Detroit, or even the big wide streets of LA or San Diego. People are happy to live on Madison or Erie in Hyde Park and Oakley, both of which are busier and wider than most downtown streets. Hell, even the new residential building in Columbia Tusculum that is literally built adjacent to Columbia Parkway is a popular place to live, and they charge high rents! The problem with parts of downtown is the inactivity and the dead zones that are created by surface lots, parking garages, and institutional users (library, courthouse, etc.).

It's all relative, I guess. I have lived my entire adult life in urban neighborhoods on the east coast and when I moved here the first thing I noticed is how wide the streets are, both downtown and in places like Oakely and Hyde Park. It's also one of the first things people comment on when they come visit me. I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though. I'd venture to guess that Madison and Erie would be even more in demand if they didn't function as highways. I agree with your last sentence though. I just don't think the problems are mutually exclusive.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jam40jeff on July 12, 2018, 03:07:53 PM
I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though.

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: IAGuy39 on July 12, 2018, 03:26:22 PM
^Central Parkway would be a lot better if they added some density in the spots where they have small one story buildings or empty lots. But yes, Central Parkway is very wide and it's even worse that is has hardly any traffic.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on July 12, 2018, 03:52:28 PM
I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though.

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.

You make good points. I retract my statement about Cleveland. They actually seem to use their street space a lot better than I remembered. I think the biggest problem is weird/big intersections like the one where Superior, W 6th, and Prospect come together.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on July 12, 2018, 04:00:40 PM
Go to downtown Boston or Philly and see that narrow streets can support many times the population that you have in Cincy.

They have subways. 

Historically, the narrowness of Cincinnati's streets was thought of as a major problem.  During the streetcar era, there was not space for loading/unloading + thru traffic.  Same when cars appeared.  It all inevitably overlapped the streetcar tracks.  In the 1910s-20s, Cincinnati spent a ton of money narrowing sidewalks by 2 feet and adding 4 total feet to the downtown street widths. 

If Cincinnati had had a downtown north/south street like Canal St. in New Orleans, the whole history of the city would have been different because streetcars could have operated in a center reservation, and later, the subway could have been cheaply extended downtown, avoiding the whole issue of Central Parkway becoming the city's new Main St. 

Which, of course, is why it was named "Central" Parkway.  It was absolutely intended to become the new center of Cincinnati. 


Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jam40jeff on July 12, 2018, 04:10:52 PM
You make good points. I retract my statement about Cleveland. They actually seem to use their street space a lot better than I remembered. I think the biggest problem is weird/big intersections like the one where Superior, W 6th, and Prospect come together.

Yes, the southern end of the Warehouse District is a bit of a mess due to all the parking, and that intersection is probably the worst in downtown.

What is frustrating about Cincinnati is that the streets are narrower than many cities so there is potential.  (The hardest thing to change is the built environment.)  The one way streets need to be ditched altogether IMO and the sidewalks be upgraded/widened in many areas.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on July 12, 2018, 04:11:51 PM
Um, so about Cincinnati's Homeless Population....
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Robuu on July 12, 2018, 04:12:58 PM
I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though.

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.

I just took rough curb-to-curb measurements of Euclid and Vine, using Google Earth's ruler tool. Euclid measured about 70', Vine about 50'.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: edale on July 12, 2018, 04:17:08 PM

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.

Hm, I guess this is a situation where we will need to agree to disagree. The streets in Cleveland felt very wide to me on each of my visits. The sidewalks are also wider. I do appreciate that Euclid has a median and dedicated transit lanes, and the median does help to break up the street a bit, just like the Central Parkway median does. But overall, Cleveland's downtown streets feel much too wide, and I've never felt that about the majority of Downtown Cincinnati streets.

You think E 9th feels like less of a highway than Vine St.?!

E. 9th:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.5037838,-81.6898234,3a,75y,311.06h,88.31t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s4QhoPqOr-wtfb8GKX0koPA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Vine:
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1000906,-84.5126913,3a,75y,346.25h,91.02t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s2sW3v4SYIUYvEOU4nLySRQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

I'd say 4th St is just as much of a "main street' for downtown as anything, and you simply don't see anything like this in downtown Cleveland, Detroit, Columbus, Indy, etc:
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1001607,-84.5113619,3a,75y,274h,94.71t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sX5a54n9C_-XCdkWl_yBQSw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ColDayMan on July 12, 2018, 04:20:09 PM
I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though.

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.

Not to get off-topic but Central Parkway doesn't go through downtown, it's an edge of it, much like Ontario Street in Cleveland being just as wide and the edge of downtown.  Cincinnati has nothing as wide as Superior (or even Euclid) going through downtown, though.  Different downtown plans in different eras.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jam40jeff on July 12, 2018, 04:34:07 PM
I agree Cleveland and Detroit are worse though.

Cleveland may have (marginally) wider downtown streets than Cincinnati, but I disagree that the feel is worse.

For example, Cleveland's "Main Street", Euclid Avenue, is probably as wide as Vine St. in Cincinnati, but the feel is worlds different.  There is a dedicated bus lane in each direction and one through travel lane.  Traffic moves very slowly and the sidewalks are wide, encouraging pedestrian activity.

Even a "highway feeder" like East 9th St., which is wider than Vine St. by one lane feels less like a highway due to having 2 through lanes in each direction plus parking.  The one way streets encourage people to drive faster and make the street feel less pedestrian friendly in my opinion.

Also, Cleveland has nothing like Central Parkway downtown.  The closest thing would be Superior Ave. in terms of width (although it's not nearly as wide), but again, Superior has been cut down to one through lane, a dedicated bus lane, and a median.

Not to get off-topic but Central Parkway doesn't go through downtown, it's an edge of it, much like Ontario Street in Cleveland being just as wide and the edge of downtown.  Cincinnati has nothing as wide as Superior (or even Euclid) going through downtown, though.  Different downtown plans in different eras.

I see what you mean on Central, but my point otherwise was that although Cleveland's streets are wider, they are two-way with less lanes in many instances so they don't feel as "anti-pedestrian" as the width would indicate in many places.

As far as the curb-to-curb width of Vine vs. Euclid...that wasn't my point.  My point was to walk down each and see how it feels.  I know that Cincinnati has narrower downtown streets.  That's why it's frustrating they aren't set up better.  One way streets wider than one lane are bad for everyone but people trying to get to the highway faster.

OK, back to homelessness...
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ColDayMan on July 12, 2018, 04:37:20 PM
I don't disagree with any of that. :)
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: edale on July 12, 2018, 04:43:53 PM
I actually like one way streets as a pedestrian. When you're crossing, you only have to look one way. Jay-walking is extremely common in Downtown Cincinnati because you don't have to travel far to get to the other side, and you only have to worry about traffic from one direction. I know the argument is normally that two way traffic is better for pedestrians, but in a downtown environment, I'm not so sure. The one ways in places like Walnut Hills are awful because cars really do speed through and treat it like a freeway. Downtown has small block sizes (which is more important to the pedestrian experience than street width, imo) and each intersection has a traffic light, so cars are constantly stopping. It's very rare to be able to go more than a couple blocks downtown without hitting a red. I believe the streetcar has exposed this point well...

Perhaps this discussion could be moved to a different thread? I think it's very interesting, but yeah, doesn't have much to do with homelessness.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on July 12, 2018, 05:07:04 PM
Cincinnati's downtown was platted with a 33 foot measuring chain which is why the distance between property lines is 66 feet.  This is the case for all streets in DT and OTR with the exception of various postwar widenings (5th each of Government Square) and Liberty St.  Central Parkway and Eggleston took over the former state-owned canal lands and so do not match.

As I already wrote, Cincinnati's downtown streets originally had 40 feet between the curbs, but that was generally widened to 44 (four 11-foot lanes) feet in the early 1900s.   
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 16, 2018, 11:31:59 AM
Great news guys. The city of Cincinnati have posted signs to the homeless camp to vacate the area in 72 hours or be arrested and put in jail.

Crews will later and come sanitize the area from all of the homeless residue and trash they left behind.

Finally the city doing something right for once.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 16, 2018, 11:37:46 AM
Good.  Now they need to clear out all the ones living on 3rd street. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 16, 2018, 11:38:44 AM
Thatís the plan!
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 16, 2018, 11:40:27 AM
Really this just shows further reason why we need to cap FWW.  If there were actually buildings with some type of business on those blocks then homeless wouldn't be able to just camp on on the sidewalks. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on July 16, 2018, 11:41:19 AM
I've always wondered why all of those benches were built down on Second and Third to begin with.  Who else was going to use them?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 19, 2018, 10:53:10 AM
Great now some of the idiots on city counsel are trying to delay cleaning out of the camp. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on July 19, 2018, 11:02:54 AM
Great now some of the idiots on city counsel are trying to delay cleaning out of the camp. 

Tamaya Dennard on City Council, who was the one who propagated racism claims against a local business (which were proven to be lies based on police body camera footage), is the one leading the charge.  Instead of trying to come up with a compassionate and permanent solution to the problem she's pushing to allow the tent city to remain there.  *sigh*
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 19, 2018, 11:11:25 AM
She's an idiot.  In no way should that tent city be allowed to stay there or anywhere in the city.  Allowing the homeless to setup up their own camps only furthers their problems and makes it worse for everyone.  Get them into homeless shelters where there are plenty of open beds and people/programs willing to help.  If they don't want to go to the shelters then find somewhere to live outside our city. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 19, 2018, 09:09:37 PM
City Council threw a wrench into the plan to clean up the tent city:

City delays evicting downtown homeless camp

https://local12.com/news/local/city-delays-evicting-downtown-homeless-camp

The debate over forced evictions at a downtown homeless camp took over City Hall Thursday.

City leaders reached a compromise Thursday afternoon, which will delay those evictions at the camp under the bridge at Third and Plum streets.

On Monday, acting city manager Patrick Duhaney ordered the site be evicted and sanitized after concerns over a hepatitis outbreak. The people living in the camp were given 72 hours to gather their belongings and move. Anything left after 6 a.m. Friday would be thrown away. On Thursday, city leaders decided to extend that deadline until Wednesday, July 25.

About 50 people live in this camp. Sanitation conditions aren't good, with food and garbage littering the space and concerns over the hepatitis outbreak and drug abuse.


One of my biggest questions is why this camp moved from the more remote regions underneath the Brent Spence Bridge, where homeless have camped for the last few years, to prominent locations on 3rd Street. This happened very quickly. It seems like some sort of political stunt.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on July 19, 2018, 10:11:19 PM
Great now some of the idiots on city counsel are trying to delay cleaning out of the camp. 

Tamaya Dennard on City Council, who was the one who propagated racism claims against a local business (which were proven to be lies based on police body camera footage), is the one leading the charge.  Instead of trying to come up with a compassionate and permanent solution to the problem she's pushing to allow the tent city to remain there.  *sigh*

Fortunately there are 5 votes against her. Mann is a pragmatic for the most part but feels everyone needs an opportunity for their voice to be heard. He will give them a few extra days but then eventually side with the others and move them along. Dennard and Seelbach are in the minority on this.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ryanlammi on July 20, 2018, 09:04:28 AM
It seems like the "the idiots on city counsel" came up with a reasonable solution. Slightly delayed eviction (less than a week), a mobile health unit to check on the people there, and social services coming to try to get some of them to go to shelters. Not sure what better course of action could be taken to mitigate this issue in the short term.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on July 20, 2018, 09:51:22 AM
^ well if you are Tamaya Dennard you need a system of comprehensive rent control throughout the city and forcing permanent housing upon these people.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 21, 2018, 02:20:12 PM
I don't think the delay accomplishes anything. The mobile health unit was already stationed at the camp last week and various social services have been visiting for months. There appears to have been been zero progress made on relocating/housing people since the initial eviction notice went out. If anything, the population is going up - there were more tents there on Friday night than I've ever seen before.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: 1400 Sycamore on July 22, 2018, 07:33:54 AM
Most of the participants attempting to "solve" this problem assume that the "homeless" do not choose to live the way they do, or that they would prefer another lifestyle. Big mistake. No solution will work unless it is attractive to the "homeless" or, alternatively, combative beyond their comfort level. One or the other.  I'd say the least likely "solution" would be a shelter with typical rules: you know: no drugs, alcohol containers, weapons, sex, fires, etc.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on July 22, 2018, 07:58:07 PM
https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/hamilton-county/cincinnati/downtown/homeless-camp-will-move-east-and-a-day-ahead-of-city-s-deadline-advocate-says

Homeless camp on 3rd st will nice day earlier on Tuesday. The camp will be relocated to a new designated homeless camping ground on the east side of the city.

I say we bring some of the homeless up to mason and west Chester. There are some great parking lots and underpasses and the rich white folks are surely compassionate to give some charity and reprieve to these struggling souls!
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 23, 2018, 08:33:25 AM
Why are they allowing them to just setup a camp somewhere else?  The same situation of drugs, disease and garbage is just going to happen again in the new location. 

Also with this camp moving they now need to get all the squatters to move off of 2nd and 3rd St.  On my walk to work this morning the amount of people on 3rd has probably doubled since this camp story came out.  If they just allow they to stay then this entire process was completely pointless. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: SleepyLeroy on July 23, 2018, 12:31:39 PM
Since we aren't being told where the camp is moving we all get to speculate and wonder so my guess is here at the end of the drive to Adams Landing on Adams Crossing Drive. I cant see it being any further East than this and any closer is back in the CBD so this has to be it.


https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1049811,-84.49538,3a,75y,32.48h,92.17t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1slBF0x8WkERo_RYBipJ5ZZA!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo1.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DlBF0x8WkERo_RYBipJ5ZZA%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D32.927464%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i3328!8i1664

Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on July 23, 2018, 04:44:50 PM
This area is considered Downtown and is served by CPD's Central Business Section. Residents, including the current President of the DRC, just had the camp under Columbia Parkway removed back in June. Plus, most of the land is owned by Towne Properties.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on July 24, 2018, 10:50:16 AM
Another pause... City says there is no deal to allow homeless encampment to move to a new location (https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/hamilton-county/cincinnati/city-says-there-is-no-deal-to-allow-homeless-encampment-to-move-to-a-new-location)


City's statement by Acting City Manager Patrick Duhaney:
Quote
ďEarlier today we received word that some confusing misinformation had made its way to the media regarding the Third Street camp and those currently living there. I want to help clarify what occurred and the City Administrationís position on the matter."

ďOn Friday, a group consisting of myself, a Councilmember and members of the Administration met with members of the Third Street camp to discuss their ideas for a possible long-term solution. A productive conversation took place but no decision was made and nothing was agreed to by the City. We look forward to more productive conversations in the future. However, the plan outlined during Council on Thursday, and then later in an FYI memo to the Mayor and Council, remains the only plan in place at this time.

To reiterate: We have not agreed to support relocating anyone from the camp to anywhere other than a designated shelter and/or a more permanent housing situation. This plan does not include any City support for relocating individuals to a new or different camp. The City has not agreed to let anyone or asked anyone to relocate the camp to any other part of Cincinnati."

Maslowís Army president and co-founder Samuel Landis statement:
Quote
"We are surprised and frustrated by the statement issued by the Acting City Manager. As disheartened as we are, we remain more committed than ever to advocate for the human rights and basic needs of people experiencing homelessness and poverty, including those who want or need to live outside.

"Throughout this process, we have been working with the Acting City Manager and several Members of City Council in good faith. On Thursday, we helped negotiate a compromise between them and the people residing in the tent city in the underpass near 3rd and Plum Streets. The Acting City Manager verbally agreed to allow some of the residents of the tent city to move to a new location if Bison got the residents to vacate the current location by Wednesday. Accordingly, on Friday, Acting City Manager Patrick Duhaney and Councilman Greg Landsman spent about 45 minutes driving around downtown with Bison and me scoping out potential locations to which residents of the tent city could relocate. They repeatedly expressed their support and approval for us to find a suitable location for the people who want or need to remain outside. They stated that they would work with us to draft and approve new ordinances and/or permitting processes but that Bison had their tacit approval to relocate in the meantime as a temporary solution.

"During the Council Meeting Thursday afternoon, Councilwoman Dennard agreed to convene a meeting on Monday with all key parties involved, including the leader of the tent city, Maslowís Army, the Homeless Coalition, downtown residents, the Acting City Manager, her and other Members of Council to discuss and agree to specific next steps for the smooth relocation of the residents of the tent city. Unfortunately, yesterday they refused to hold such a meeting and instead only hosted a choreographed photo op at the tent city.

"In hindsight, we should have required that these agreements be put in writing. We will be working with the Homeless Coalition and others to ensure that the City follows through on their commitment to treat these people with the compassion and dignity they deserve."


In the meantime, the camp across the street from the East Garage on Pete Rose Way has grown from a couple of tents yesterday to a least a half dozen this morning.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 24, 2018, 12:35:03 PM
It's starting to seem like the city's lack of a coherent response is encouraging people to set up camp on 3rd Street. I wouldn't be surprised if people are getting word of this camp and moving there from shelters. In other words, the camp is actively encouraging homeless people to get back on the streets rather than off them.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 24, 2018, 01:57:24 PM
What a clusterfuck the politicians have made this
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jdm00 on July 25, 2018, 10:53:45 AM
So did they clear out the camp yesterday? 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 25, 2018, 11:03:56 AM
It was being cleared out this morning. It also looks like the city is putting up chain link fencing to close off access to the underpass.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 25, 2018, 02:37:14 PM
Now the bums who live on 3rd St (who have only increased since they closed the camp) held a press conference today and are making demands to the city.  Of course Josh Spring is the leader in this circus.  As laughable as it is that they call themselves "Residents of 3rd St" the city can't put up fencing to keep them off 3rd like they did for for the previous location.  They could keep running them off 3rd but surely they'll just keep coming back at a later time.  This has gotten completely out of hand and city needs to do something that will have a long term affect.  All this bad press has done is lead to more people having bad views of downtown.   


"Residents of Third Street met Tuesday evening. The group decided to make it clear that they are completely opposed to the removal actions the City of Cincinnati has taken against those who were living underneath Ft. Washington Way. Understanding that they are likely the cityís next target, the Residents who live on the sidewalk of Third Street are announcing that they do not intend to leave Third Street because of a city order, but instead demand that the city act on focused solutions to homelessness, which are affordable housing that is available for all, employment, mental health services when needed and access to additional basic necessities."
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on July 25, 2018, 03:06:26 PM
Now the bums who live on 3rd St (who have only increased since they closed the camp) held a press conference today and are making demands to the city.  Of course Josh Spring is the leader in this circus.  As laughable as it is that they call themselves "Residents of 3rd St" the city can't put up fencing to keep them off 3rd like they did for for the previous location.  They could keep running them off 3rd but surely they'll just keep coming back at a later time.  This has gotten completely out of hand and city needs to do something that will have a long term affect.  All this bad press has done is lead to more people having bad views of downtown.   


"Residents of Third Street met Tuesday evening. The group decided to make it clear that they are completely opposed to the removal actions the City of Cincinnati has taken against those who were living underneath Ft. Washington Way. Understanding that they are likely the cityís next target, the Residents who live on the sidewalk of Third Street are announcing that they do not intend to leave Third Street because of a city order, but instead demand that the city act on focused solutions to homelessness, which are affordable housing that is available for all, employment, mental health services when needed and access to additional basic necessities."

Josh Spring gets under my skin he is only there to drum up the media and drama. He is never there to create lasting solutions. Biggest issue with many of the homeless is there are rooms at shelters and clinics for drug addiction. However many dont want to give up there life choices to try and better themselves in the long run. Another issue is many have mental issues, and since on a federal level mental health spending has been cut over the years the resources are just not as great for those with mental problems.
     
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 30, 2018, 03:19:43 PM
The "residents" of 3rd St put out another press release today put together by Josh Spring and his worthless crew.  As I said before if they don't get these people to move off 3rd St before Oktoberfest it's going to get really ugly. 


"To the People of Cincinnati Hello Neighbor,

You may have heard about those of us who live outside along 3rd Street. We want to take a moment to communicate directly.

Without this publicly-owned space to lay our heads and protect one-another, we would not have a consistent place to be.Itís not that any of us want to be without a home, but like millions of other people in this country, we are.

In Hamilton County we have a shortage of more than 40,000 affordable homes.About 56,000 people are trying to fit into 16,000 affordable homes.

Big problems like this one require big solutions.We know that forcing us from the support of the community we have built, and this public land is not a solution.Living outside is already very difficult without the hammer of being forced from even a public sidewalk hanging over our heads.We already have to deal with the weather, lack of privacy, constant noise from traffic, lack of bathroom access, inability to store healthy food and never being able to really relax and have moment to ourselves.

We know we are a part of a large and growing number of women, men and children facing homelessness in Cincinnati.We implore the City of Cincinnati and City Council to act toward us in good faith, not only in terms of immediate needs, but to focus on long-term solutions that will create desperately needed access to an adequate quantity of affordable housing.

With this said, as Cincinnatians, we release the following list of actions we call for the City of Cincinnati to take with us.

The City of Cincinnati will not engage in the actions of warning, citing, noticing or otherwise telling, forcing or intimidating persons to vacate public land. In order to sustain a healthy environment for the residents of Third Street, the City will supply and maintain at least three public restrooms with showers, which could be in the form of port-o-lets that are accessible to people with handicaps and are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. These facilities will be regularly cleaned, and supplied with adequate quantities of toilet paper and hand sanitizer. The city will provide such restrooms in other areas as deemed necessary for health safety. All people will have the right to access all restrooms in city-owned facilities with an indoor entrance during the regular business hours of that facility and all restroom in city-owned structures with an outdoor entrance at all times. The City will furnish garbage and recycle vestibules on each block of Third Street in such a quantity necessary to contain all garbage items produced along these blocks (at least four city garbage cans per block) with an adequate rate of pickup; at least weekly. The city will provide such vestibules in other areas as deemed necessary for health safety and sanitation. Any person residing on public land will have access to reasonable opportunity to relocate into a permanent housing option that is suitable to them. The City will partner with local housing-focused organization and the City will follow the basic assistant tenants provided in the Uniform Relocation Act as a minimum standard. The City will provide the necessary funding for a no-barrier shelter that is open and available all year-round. The City will increase the Human Services budget to ensure that social service agencies can adequately provide the following services which are necessary for some people:

Access to IDs
Reduce barriers to employment
Mental healthcare/ addiction recovery
Transportation assistance
The city will approve a motion necessary to re-start the Afford able Housing Working Group staffed by the Department of Community and Economic Development, with the task of bringing forth legislation for City Council to pass in order to establish and adequately fund an Affordable Housing Trust Fund.

City Council will begin discussion of proposed legislative protections for people who rent and legislation in the form of a Homeless Bill of Rights.

Sincerely with Hope,

Residents of The Colony on Third Street"
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 30, 2018, 03:50:41 PM
The "residents" of 3rd St put out another press release today put together by Josh Spring and his worthless crew.  As I said before if they don't get these people to move off 3rd St before Oktoberfest it's going to get really ugly. 

After much delay and procrastination, the Plum Street Underpass tent city was expeditiously removed mere days before the start of Bengals training camp and the Cincinnati Music Festival. I imagine the same fate will be faced by the rest of the 3rd street bum camp prior to Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest vendors will have permits to use the space and the city will be obligated to turn over a clean and empty street. I just don't expect the city to do much about it until they're facing an immediate deadline.

A few months after Oktoberfest, temperatures will get cold and the vast majority of the "residents" will no longer have the desire to camp out on the street as they'll make their way to any of the plentiful shelters nearby. Then we can repeat it all over again in the spring when Taste of Cincinnati is on the horizon.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on July 30, 2018, 03:52:19 PM
Josh Spring needs to eat a bag of s**t
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on July 31, 2018, 12:34:18 PM
I just don't expect the city to do much about it until they're facing an immediate deadline.

Maybe I'll be proven wrong:

Mayor calls downtown homeless camps unacceptable, says they must go

https://www.wlwt.com/article/mayor-calls-downtown-homeless-camps-unacceptable-says-they-must-go/22596008

CINCINNATI ó

Cincinnati's mayor said Monday that the homeless tents along Third Street and under an overpass near US Bank Arena must be removed.

John Cranley characterized it as a public health issue.

As the homeless along Third Street dug in, resolving anew to stay put, Cranley minced no words about why the tents will have to go.

"It's a public health hazard for the people living there and for the city as a whole," he said. "So, I find them to be totally unacceptable."
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 31, 2018, 12:45:28 PM
Sadly the mayor rightfully saying this will likely lead to nothing happening.  The "progressive 5" on city counsel seem to go against anything he wants done out of spite, even in the rare instances that he's in the right.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on July 31, 2018, 12:47:44 PM
Sadly the mayor rightfully saying this will likely lead to nothing happening.  The "progressive 5" on city counsel seem to go against anything he wants done out of spite, even in the rare instances that he's in the right.

This particular issue though is a city manager one, so unless City Council passes any ordinances or the like (which are subject to mayoral veto) this is an issue managed by Patrick Duhaney.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on July 31, 2018, 01:12:31 PM
Speaking of which, are we ever going to get a permanent city manager?  Or is keeping an interim city manager a way for Cranley to have even more power than he would have otherwise?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: brian korte on July 31, 2018, 02:30:40 PM
Speaking of which, are we ever going to get a permanent city manager?  Or is keeping an interim city manager a way for Cranley to have even more power than he would have otherwise?

The latter.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on July 31, 2018, 02:47:36 PM
The City of Cincinnati will not engage in the actions of warning, citing, noticing or otherwise telling, forcing or intimidating persons to vacate public land.

Sincerely with Hope,

Residents of The Colony on Third Street"

City moves to clear out another homeless camp in downtown Cincinnati (https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/hamilton-county/cincinnati/downtown/city-moves-to-clear-out-more-homeless-downtown)

The city already cleared out one homeless camp Downtown. A second could be gone within days, too.

Police served notices Tuesday afternoon to people living outdoors along Third Street, city spokesman Casey Weldon said. It gives people 72 hours to remove their property from the sidewalk and side of the street.

Officers handed notices to people, if they were there; in some cases, they left notices on people's tents.

Capt. Mike Neville, commander of the police department's Central Business District, said there was no "directive" to clear out the camp.

Cont. (https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/hamilton-county/cincinnati/downtown/city-moves-to-clear-out-more-homeless-downtown)
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on July 31, 2018, 03:07:19 PM
I'm very glad to see they're making them move off 3rd street.  For such a prominent street to our downtown it's a horrible look right now.  It seems like with each time they do a clear out they get some portion of the homeless to move into shelters so that is a positive.  I'm sure the portion that have no plans to leave the streets will find somewhere else to go though so it's a situation that's worth following. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on July 31, 2018, 03:30:25 PM
It is refreshing for a mayor to actually talk about clearing up the problem instead of pussyfooting around the issue and placating the Josh Spring's of the world. This is what happens in many other big cities and it is good to see Cranley is taking a tough stand.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on August 03, 2018, 11:54:17 AM
Homeless file lawsuit against the city: 'Do the right thing' says homeless coalition leader (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/08/03/cincinnati-homeless-file-lawsuit-agains-city/897918002/)

The homeless living on Third Street say they arenít going anywhere today.

The people living in the tent city filed a lawsuit in federal court Friday asking for relief from a city-scheduled cleanup.

The lawsuit claims the city breaks constitutional law by evicting the homeless from Third Street and throwing away belongings.

Cont (https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/08/03/cincinnati-homeless-file-lawsuit-agains-city/897918002/)
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on August 03, 2018, 12:04:30 PM
Update: A judge denied a motion for a restraining order against the city filed by residents of the Third Street homeless camp, according to Josh Spring, CEO Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 03, 2018, 12:58:00 PM
Good.  Go away Josh
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: 1400 Sycamore on August 03, 2018, 01:26:03 PM
I guess Josh Spring is the reincarnation of Buddy Gray.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on August 03, 2018, 02:53:30 PM
From WCPO on Twitter:

Some tents relocated around the corner as city cleans area of homeless camp on Third Street http://bit.ly/2vAy1fZ
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Djse4neXsAAqbZZ.jpg)
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 03, 2018, 03:23:26 PM
That's an even worse spot.  Now they're in the way for the thousands that walk to and from the banks garage for work everyday.  Not to mention people walking to the Reds games from downtown, people walking to the banks for lunch and dinner, people walking to the park, ect.  What a horrible look for the city.  They need to get them out permanently. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cygnus on August 03, 2018, 03:49:05 PM
And just like that, all tents, save for one that moved down by Great American Tower, have returned to where they were prior to the ďclean-up.Ē
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 03, 2018, 04:03:26 PM
It is going to be a battle for a while, but if the city keeps giving them 72 hour notices, enough of them will get frustrated and just go somewhere else where they will not be harassed.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on August 03, 2018, 04:27:56 PM
FWW has been there in this configuration for 18 years.  This is the first time we've seen tents on the overpasses, so it looks a bit like a set-up. 

I remember when homeless people used to live in the overgrown bushes along the south side of 3rd St. when the old FWW was there, but it was only 2-3 people. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 03, 2018, 04:54:52 PM
The 72 hour notices are pretty pointless because when the clock winds down, all that happens is the city comes in, picks up trash, and pressure washes the sidewalks. They don't stick around to monitor the area and keep people from simply moving back in, so the tents are put back up almost immediately. This happened a few times at the Plum Street underpass before the city finally put up the fence to keep people out - a strategy that won't work on 3rd, and probably won't work long term for the underpass as I'm sure the Bengals will want it open when the season starts. Unless the city is willing to ticket/arrest people who set up camps on public rights of way, the camps aren't going anywhere.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 03, 2018, 05:03:29 PM
unfortunately a judge says you need the 72 hour notice, so you have to do that. Arresting them does not help. The only way is to continue to frustrate them until they give up.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 03, 2018, 06:27:38 PM
^ They have to give 72 hour notice before they clear out the camps, the problem is they give the notice but don't go through with clearing out out the camps - they just clean up and let everyone come back. The camp is already set up again, hours after the alleged deadline. This doesn't frustrate the campers, it's more like complimentary maid services.

After the initial notice, the city should be able to remove tents at will indefinitely.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ColDayMan on August 04, 2018, 04:06:32 PM
Judge denies homeless camp's motion to stay on Third Street

A federal district court judge on Friday denied a request by the residents of a homeless camp on Third Street downtown to stop the city from kicking them out.

The residents of the tent city set up along Third Street downtown filed a lawsuit on Aug. 3 in the Southern District of Ohio against the city of Cincinnati, asking the court to halt a planned removal of the homeless on Friday. Judge Timothy Black Friday afternoon denied a motion for injunctive relief that would have halted the removal.

More below:
https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2018/08/03/judge-denies-homeless-camps-motion-to-stay-on.html
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: unusualfire on August 05, 2018, 11:53:54 PM
If  this happened in Indian Hill do they also have to get 72 hours notice???
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 06, 2018, 10:06:03 AM
^ Don't know, don't care. It wouldn't happen in Indian Hill because they know how to make the problem go away without anyone knowing it in Indian Hill.


In all serious, it does not happen in Indian Hill because it is not a population center with people walking by all the time. There is not the transportation or other means to get there along with other logistical challenges. That is why you never see it in Indian Hill.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 06, 2018, 10:17:00 AM
https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/politics/2018/08/06/cincinnati-homeless-deters-file-suit-remove-homeless-camp-downtown/912727002/

Deters is trying to get a civil nuisance lawsuit passed where it will be illegal for a camp to exist downtown "south of Central Parkway to the river, east of Interstate 75 and west of Eggleston Drive."  He claims that HIV positive needles have been found at the camp, as well as human waste and urination.  If true then I don't see how a judge could disagree with the camps being a threat to the health and public safety of residents.  Hopefully he can get this passed/approved and we can get the camps moved out permanently. 

Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ColDayMan on August 06, 2018, 02:10:56 PM
Judge rules Cincinnati homeless camps must go

A Greater Cincinnati judge has granted a temporary restraining order that calls for downtownís homeless camps to be closed.

Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Robert Ruehlman granted the restraining order on Monday afternoon after Prosecutor Joe Deters filed a civil nuisance lawsuit asking to remove the Third Street homeless camp and prevent others from popping up.

A full hearing on the request has been scheduled for 9 a.m. Aug. 20.

More below:
https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2018/08/06/judge-rules-cincinnati-homeless-camps-must-go.html
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: cincydave8 on August 07, 2018, 07:00:36 AM
Lots of homeless tent have popped up in the small park between Reading and Central across the street from the casino.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 07, 2018, 08:06:52 AM
Lots of homeless tent have popped up in the small park between Reading and Central across the street from the casino.

I guess being less than a block away from the jail will make it easier when they're inevitably locked up.

On the flip side Third Street was cleared this morning.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 07, 2018, 08:15:15 AM
You knew that was going to happen.  I'm willing to bet Josh Spring is telling them each time where to setup the new camp.  I'm not sure why Deters wanted to make Central the north end of the no camps zone, now he's just going to piss off the casino and all the people/businesses in OTR and Pendleton.  He should have made the line Liberty or McMiken. 

Also there were still plenty of tents on 3rd St this morning.  We'll see if they move out today or if they stay and continue to fight.  If they don't leave hopefully they stop babying the situation and just arrest them. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 07, 2018, 08:25:10 AM
I just dropped off my daughter at a daycare around 8am this morning on Third and Walnut and I didn't see a single tent.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 07, 2018, 08:28:48 AM
I just dropped off my daughter at a daycare around 8am this morning on Third and Walnut and I didn't see a single tent.
I know that's where most of them were but I can't see that area while walking to work.  There were still 5-10 of them on 3rd between Race and Elm around 7:45.  Good to hear they're in the process of clearing them out though. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on August 07, 2018, 09:00:25 AM
The camp by lytle tunnel under 71 was still going strong at 830 am. They are suppose to be moved out as well.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 07, 2018, 12:05:25 PM
You knew that was going to happen.  I'm willing to bet Josh Spring is telling them each time where to setup the new camp.  I'm not sure why Deters wanted to make Central the north end of the no camps zone, now he's just going to piss off the casino and all the people/businesses in OTR and Pendleton.  He should have made the line Liberty or McMiken. 

So long as the city is only allowed to enforce the law in certain, specific areas, the camps will continue to relocate. The problem will perpetually be moved like a big game of whack-a-mole, and the Josh Spring's of the world will always be there to make sure the problem moves from one in-your-face location to another.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: SleepyLeroy on August 07, 2018, 12:17:30 PM
So now everyone is here on this traffic island?!?

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1084855,-84.5087762,3a,75y,121.3h,87.75t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sMgDJYRpqW19bKl8mF4zZkw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: cincydave8 on August 07, 2018, 01:03:09 PM
So now everyone is here on this traffic island?!?

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1084855,-84.5087762,3a,75y,121.3h,87.75t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sMgDJYRpqW19bKl8mF4zZkw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656



Yes
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on August 07, 2018, 01:50:24 PM
Did they take the streetcar?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 07, 2018, 02:11:25 PM
I cant wait until city council cuts the funding to Josh Spring's organization for this clown show.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 08, 2018, 10:35:44 AM
Anyone have an update on the Lytle tunnel encampment or Jack Casino one?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 08, 2018, 10:42:05 AM
^ Deters went back to the court yesterday and extended the "no-tent zone" from the Ohio River to the Norwood Lateral, between 71 and 75. The first time I heard that I thought it was a joke because the border seems so arbitrary. So far I don't think the police have taken down the encampments, though - per the Enquirer:

"As of 9:45 a.m., tents were still up on Central Parkway and no police or sheriff's personnel were seen."

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/08/08/cincinnati-homeless-camp-jack-casino-move-police/928408002/
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 08, 2018, 10:48:21 AM
Yeah, I heard about the extension of the borders.  Has anyone walked by either Lytle Tunnel or Jack Casino yet today?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: SleepyLeroy on August 08, 2018, 11:01:01 AM
This was an informative listen from the beginning, but particularly revelant from -11.00 on. He mentions how there are two guys using this as a personal stand for themselves and disappear when the cameras are gone. We can speculate on who he means by the other but one is identified shortly after this clip starts. Hard issue all around but these people surely don't need to be pawns in other peoples quest for fame/recognition.  https://www.facebook.com/randall.wyatt.9/videos/2062053027456078/?t=808
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: savadams13 on August 08, 2018, 11:41:48 AM
They have removed the camp by the south entrance of Lytle Tunnel across from US Bank Arena.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 09, 2018, 04:18:23 PM
Deters is finally looking to get rid of the tent-city enforcement boundaries and extend the ability to shut down the camps to the entire county:

Deters wants homeless ban for all of Hamilton County: 'They need to go to shelters'

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/08/09/homeless-ban-deters-wants-extended-all-hamilton-county/947325002/

Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on August 09, 2018, 04:31:32 PM
Great news. It's hard to encourage surburban folk to try, "urban living" when the streets reek of piss, you can visually see human feces on the side walk from the homeless, and encounter constant harassment from the homeless to give, "change", and encounter multiple police visits a night to these said camps.

Good to see this city is finally growing a pair.

I know there needs to more affordable housing options. I understand that. But the majority of these homeless tent residents enjoy there way of life, and enjoy the fact that they can freely be on heroin and drink alcohol whenever they want. They enjoy that freedom.

I can't wait to see Josh Springs load these tent residents on a bus and plop them in Warren County on the streets of West Chester. It's gonna be hilarious!
 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 09, 2018, 04:33:37 PM
Good to see Cranley and Deters taking a strong stance on this.  Trying to work with them or just ignoring the problem is how the west coast cities lost control of this issue.  If you don't want to go to a shelter and get help then find another city to live in. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on August 09, 2018, 04:36:17 PM
Good to see Cranley and Deters taking a strong stance on this.  Trying to work with them or just ignoring the problem is how the west coast cities lost control of this issue.  If you don't want to go to a shelter and get help then find another city to live in.

I'm sort of surprised there sticking around the cbd of cincy, and haven't simply jumped across the river to NKY...
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 09, 2018, 04:41:14 PM
Good to see Cranley and Deters taking a strong stance on this.  Trying to work with them or just ignoring the problem is how the west coast cities lost control of this issue.  If you don't want to go to a shelter and get help then find another city to live in.

I'm sort of surprised there sticking around the cbd of cincy, and haven't simply jumped across the river to NKY...

It wouldn't be in Josh Spring's interest to do that.  This is all about him.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: The_Cincinnati_Kid on August 09, 2018, 05:23:18 PM
While I like the strong stance, the ACLU will be all over blocking this.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: wjh2 on August 09, 2018, 06:47:09 PM
Iím no legal expert. But how is it a Civil Liberty (ACLU) to live on the sidewalk (and some - not all - drinking and doing drugs on public land)? There are options to get job training and shelter. If you donít want to contribute to society then you canít expect people to come to the table to come to an agreement.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Ram23 on August 09, 2018, 06:58:30 PM
The court ruled in Deters favor, so tent cities are effectively banned county-wide. I've already seen local media and other dweebs on social media start to refer to this as a "homeless ban" so I wouldn't be surprised if it ends up being national news within a few days. The Vox's and Huffington Post's of the world love these kinds of stories.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: ryanlammi on August 09, 2018, 07:13:54 PM
What determines what a "tent city" is? Will two tents make up a "tent city"?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Jimmy Skinner on August 10, 2018, 10:58:58 AM
The homeless camp has moved to a lot at 13th and Republic. At least this made the drug dealers move out.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 10, 2018, 11:29:39 AM
The homeless camp has moved to a lot at 13th and Republic. At least this made the drug dealers move out.
The little grass area?  Not sure why they keep moving somewhere when they know they'll just get kicked out again.  If they find it to be the same people they're continuing to deal with they should arrest them.  And there were drug dealers there before?  I've walked by that area a bunch but maybe I just never noticed them. 

Little "parks" like that really serve no purpose and only attract negative things like homeless and drug activity.  Considering there's a real park less then 300 feet away they should develop that lot.   
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on August 10, 2018, 11:47:16 AM
The homeless camp has moved to a lot at 13th and Republic. At least this made the drug dealers move out.
The little grass area?  Not sure why they keep moving somewhere when they know they'll just get kicked out again.  If they find it to be the same people they're continuing to deal with they should arrest them.  And there were drug dealers there before?  I've walked by that area a bunch but maybe I just never noticed them. 

Little "parks" like that really serve no purpose and only attract negative things like homeless and drug activity.  Considering there's a real park less then 300 feet away they should develop that lot.

It's a privately owned park and they've been given permission by the owner to be there. And yes, drug dealers regularly congregate there.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: SleepyLeroy on August 10, 2018, 11:59:05 AM
I could be wrong but it appears the owner of that property does not live near there which is a pretty crappy way to help IMHO. I initially thought they lived nearby but did some googling.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: DEPACincy on August 10, 2018, 12:03:43 PM
I could be wrong but it appears the owner of that property does not live near there which is a pretty crappy way to help IMHO. I initially thought they lived nearby but did some googling.

It's owned by Over the Rhine Community Housing, which is on 14th Street. It's a three minute walk away according to Google maps.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: SleepyLeroy on August 10, 2018, 12:14:15 PM
I could be wrong but it appears the owner of that property does not live near there which is a pretty crappy way to help IMHO. I initially thought they lived nearby but did some googling.

It's owned by Over the Rhine Community Housing, which is on 14th Street. It's a three minute walk away according to Google maps.

Ahhh, thanks looks like my google power was off a bit. I'm sure the neighbors to the 'park' didn't expect that this was one of the ways it was going to be used though. It may be a place for a tent but it has the same problems that all the other places had, namely no bathrooms/showers/privacy or security.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 10, 2018, 12:42:42 PM
There has to be a zoning/use violation here.  I can't believe that in an urban area that camping is permitted like this.  I really hope that the city no longer provides any funding for Over the Rhine Community Housing projects in the future after this.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: cincydave8 on August 10, 2018, 01:03:34 PM
I just had lunch at Kruegers and there was a homeless person out front telling (almost yelling to) anyone she could about the new camp around the corner and how they could use anything to help like hand sanitizer or water.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Cincy513 on August 10, 2018, 01:36:47 PM
Yeah the city needs to get them out of there asap. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on August 10, 2018, 02:08:45 PM
I mean they can also take the drug dealers with them on the way out.

I'd almost rather have homeless camps, than drug dealers who could mug you at any time to increase his paystub for the day. That lot really should be developed by now....Advocates complain that OTR doesn't have enough affordable housing, and gentrification and blah blah blah...yet they are sitting on an empty lot that is used for drug dealers, and homless camps...what a joke these organizations are. They only look out for themselves in the end. 
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 10, 2018, 02:12:04 PM
Friday nights are particularly bad for drug dealing in that area.  Tonight is going to be rough.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: troeros on August 10, 2018, 02:19:21 PM
This might be a rhetorical question, but if this is a, "private" park is it legal for the owners to allow illegal drug activity on their private land? Do laws not abide anymore if the land is designated private? Curious, because im sure the owners of the lot know what is going on in that sub park. No actual otr resident uses that park, and I always try to avoid that street at night because i'm afraid of becoming a victim.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: GCrites80s on August 10, 2018, 02:24:23 PM
I do know it makes some laws harder to enforce. Like if a car accident happens in a mall parking lot all the police do is take a report (as long as there aren't drugs or alcohol involved) and then the accident becomes no-fault. Also there aren't any citations.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 10, 2018, 05:08:48 PM
This might be a rhetorical question, but if this is a, "private" park is it legal for the owners to allow illegal drug activity on their private land? Do laws not abide anymore if the land is designated private? Curious, because im sure the owners of the lot know what is going on in that sub park. No actual otr resident uses that park, and I always try to avoid that street at night because i'm afraid of becoming a victim.

Technically no, if it is a controlled substance owners of private property have a duty to report it or they may be subject to fines. This is often easier said than done and hard to enforce but technically it is the law.

For example, in apartments, if your tenant is known to have drugs in the unit (even if they are not a dealer) then under Ohio law, you are required to evict them (if you can prove the illegal drug activity). If you do not evict them and let the illegal drug activity go on, the landlord may be subjected to fines.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Wally on August 10, 2018, 07:52:38 PM
So is someone going to bring in Port-A-Lets for the homeless to use, or are they just gonna start using every nook and cranny and alley in that area as their restroom?
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 13, 2018, 08:05:21 AM
So is someone going to bring in Port-A-Lets for the homeless to use, or are they just gonna start using every nook and cranny and alley in that area as their restroom?

The latter sadly.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: bfwissel on August 13, 2018, 08:08:31 AM
This might be a rhetorical question, but if this is a, "private" park is it legal for the owners to allow illegal drug activity on their private land? Do laws not abide anymore if the land is designated private? Curious, because im sure the owners of the lot know what is going on in that sub park. No actual otr resident uses that park, and I always try to avoid that street at night because i'm afraid of becoming a victim.

Technically no, if it is a controlled substance owners of private property have a duty to report it or they may be subject to fines. This is often easier said than done and hard to enforce but technically it is the law.

For example, in apartments, if your tenant is known to have drugs in the unit (even if they are not a dealer) then under Ohio law, you are required to evict them (if you can prove the illegal drug activity). If you do not evict them and let the illegal drug activity go on, the landlord may be subjected to fines.

If that's true about evictions that's pretty funny.  The head of Tender Mercies has told me that new-ish HUD rules indicate they are required to try to keep drug addicts housed even if they're actively abusing.  This means their properties on 12th Street between Race and Vine are a constant nuisance with drug abuse/dealing happening all the time in front of their buildings as well as in the surrounding area.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: Brutus_buckeye on August 13, 2018, 08:57:28 AM
It is an example where HUD regs conflict with state law and in some cases federal law. This is what leads to lawsuits because you have landlords trying to follow 3 different laws in conflict with each other in many cases. In some cases the Fed law and HUD rules are in direct conflict with each other and some law firms use this to exploit the issue.
Title: Re: Cincinnati's Homeless Population
Post by: jmecklenborg on August 13, 2018, 12:00:47 PM
The tent village on Republic St. seems like a bit of a non-event.  It's not quite big enough or high profile enough to really piss off the general public.  It is, however, very close to Washington Park, so we again, 30 years later, see homeless advocates trying to move their people as close to Music Hall (and rich people) as possible.

Speaking of rich people, I noticed that the lots that Josh Spring's organization owns on Vine across from and just north of Kroger are still being used for parking for who-knows-who.  So if Spring really wanted a higher profile location for his people, they could be setting up on those very valuable vacant lots next to his building.  But they didn't want to inconvenience whoever parks there, which likely includes Spring himself.

Also, Spring still personally owns the 90x90 foot parcel on York St. near Kaiser Pickle.  He put the lots up for sale earlier this year but they did not sell.  He personally owns land where people could camp but he doesn't invite them there - he puts them instead at the corner of Republic & 13th.