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Author Topic: Cleveland: Historic Photos  (Read 52895 times)

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Offline MidwestChamp

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1380 on: December 14, 2017, 11:09:56 AM »
I can't read the articles, just the headlines.  Does anyone know why these officials in these cities were targeted?

Offline YABO713

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1381 on: December 14, 2017, 11:38:59 AM »
I can't read the articles, just the headlines.  Does anyone know why these officials in these cities were targeted?

I remember from a course I took in college re: Anarchy as a philosophy... These cities at the time were each home to respective titans of industry that were seen to be controlling the US Government and life in the US via their monopolies and oligopolies.

Cleveland had Rockefeller
Pittsburgh had Mellon and Carnegie
Boston has a slew of financiers

In their opinion, it were these forces that were behind the purge of socialists and communists from mainstream life.

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1382 on: December 14, 2017, 12:12:03 PM »
I can't read the articles, just the headlines.  Does anyone know why these officials in these cities were targeted?

They didn't just target officials. They bombed all sorts of places where economic power was seated. They bombed Wall Street. They derailed trains (including one on the busy Erie Railroad near the Hiram-Garrettsville station). They attacked corporate headquarters (bombs, fires, etc). And yes, they targeted political and corporate leaders including killing President McKinley of Canton and near-assassination of Carnegie Steel President Henry Clay Frick, a noted union buster.
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1383 on: December 14, 2017, 12:55:32 PM »
The Cleveland Press Building, 1961. Northeast corner of East Ninth Street and Lakeside Avenue.

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Offline Pugu

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1384 on: December 14, 2017, 03:41:47 PM »
I wish we still had the Cleveland Press.

Online westerninterloper

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1385 on: December 14, 2017, 04:00:29 PM »
I can't read the articles, just the headlines.  Does anyone know why these officials in these cities were targeted?

They didn't just target officials. They bombed all sorts of places where economic power was seated. They bombed Wall Street. They derailed trains (including one on the busy Erie Railroad near the Hiram-Garrettsville station). They attacked corporate headquarters (bombs, fires, etc). And yes, they targeted political and corporate leaders including killing President McKinley of Canton and near-assassination of Carnegie Steel President Henry Clay Frick, a noted union buster.

But McKinley and others were assassinated by anarchists, the perps of much of the political violence before WWI.  The bombings mentioned below were in response to the first Red Scare and Palmer Raids, correct - a response to/by Communists.

Offline freethink

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1386 on: December 14, 2017, 05:58:11 PM »
The Cleveland Press Building, 1961. Northeast corner of East Ninth Street and Lakeside Avenue.



And below is what was supposed to be built on top of that structure which was proposed by former Cleveland Press owner Joseph Cole.
From wiki:

North Point Tower was proposed by Cleveland Press owner Joseph Cole in 1979. In March 1980, The North Point Plan was revealed as a 500-foot (150 m), 41-story office tower with a glass-enclosed atrium. There were plans to build a hotel on the site and an atrium displaying Press printing machines to the public. The tower would have been built on top of the 1957 structure. When the Cleveland Press folded on June 17, 1982, the North Point Plan did too. Construction of a more modest North Point I began in 1983,  and the Cleveland Press building was demolished. It was completed in 1985. North Point II (North Point Tower) was added in 1990.

Offline Pugu

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1387 on: December 14, 2017, 07:34:08 PM »
^Even that layout is far better than what we ended up with. Looking at that photo, in the original plan, the tower was on the corner of 9th and Lakeside--great street presence and energy.  What we got today is a much short building set WAY BACK from the corner and a stupid green lawn or whatever on the corner of 9th and Lakeside.

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1388 on: December 16, 2017, 07:22:05 PM »
This large Christmas tree stood in the northeast corner of Cleveland Public Square in 1935, presented by the May Company to the city.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 07:30:15 PM by KJP »
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1389 on: December 28, 2017, 02:48:49 PM »
I'm working on an idea for the West Shoreway, but wanted to first learn some of the history of its predecessor -- the old Bulkley Boulevard. It's really a shame that more effort wasn't made during this latest reconstruction effort to restore the grand boulevard that Bulkley was up until it was reconstructed as a brutalist highway in 1939-40. But that was the era when folks like Normal Bel Geddes (a Cleveland Institute of Art graduate!) advocated for redesigning American cities to get more cars through them faster.

Here's how Bulkley Boulevard looked on a 1922 insurance map of Cleveland...

BulkleyBlvd-Westend-1922 by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

BulkleyBlvd-Middle-1922 by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

BulkleyBlvd-Eastend-1922 by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr


Here are a few photos taken of Bulkley Boulevard in 1938, the year before construction got underway on the Shoreway highway. I'm presenting them in the same manner as the maps, from west-to-east. But I'll revisit this first photo because it had me stumped a bit. I figured it was the railroad underpass at the Westinghouse plant, but guessed wrong on which direction the photo was taken....

BulkleyBlvd-RRbridge-westward-1938s by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

Looking west, between West 29th and West 45th intersections...
BulkleyBlvd-W28th-westward-1938s by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

Looking east from the West 29th intersection. That was the first of three closely spaced intersections in this area -- West 29th, West 28th and West 25 where the boulevard ended. Note the old St. Malachi Church (it burned down in the 1940s and quickly replaced) as well as Terminal Tower to the right of the decorative light pole...
BulkleyBlvd-W28th-eastward-1938s by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

Looking west from the West 25th intersection...
BulkleyBlvd-W28th-westward2-1938s by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

Back to the underpass. I drive or ride under this underpass almost every day. Except it's not this underpass. Bulkley Boulevard's underpass was maybe 100 feet east of the current West Shoreway underpass which was built to ease the curve on the new highway. In fact, there's a stone abutment along the Shoreway that I didn't know was built along the edge of the old Bulkley Boulevard. Sadly, it's one of the few remnants of the old boulevard that's still visible from both the ground and the air. It's visible to the right side of the 1938 and 2017 pictures (and yes, it looks like the Shoreway curve was super-elevated/banked by a few feet so cars could take it faster -- note where the grassy surface meets the stonework today)...

BulkleyBlvd-RRbridge-westward-1938s by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

BulkleyBlvd-wallremnant-2017-2 by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr

This image helps to show how much the Shoreway was realigned vs. the old Bulkley Boulevard, the retaining wall for which starts to the right of and immediately next to the Shoreway. That stone wall gently curves away from the Shoreway and then points directly at the railroad, making for a near 90-degree angle for its underpass. Any evidence of that old underpass has long since vanished from view...
BulkleyBlvd-wallremnant-2017 by Ken Prendergast, on Flickr
« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 03:36:49 PM by KJP »
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Offline bigbrian24

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1390 on: December 28, 2017, 06:35:34 PM »
Looks like the old boulevard might have gone thru were the "poo" plant is now,where the road to Wendy park is?

Offline bigbrian24

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1391 on: December 28, 2017, 06:37:43 PM »
When was the gigantic Westinghouse building built? Had to been after the rebuilding of the boulevard.

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1392 on: December 28, 2017, 06:54:23 PM »
When was the gigantic Westinghouse building built? Had to been after the rebuilding of the boulevard.

If Emporis is correct, the 8-story building was completed in 1915.
https://www.emporis.com/buildings/201301/westinghouse-building-cleveland-oh-usa
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Offline Cleburger

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1393 on: December 28, 2017, 07:43:01 PM »
Great old photos!   To me this is more evidence to take the current Shoreway blvd down to two lanes of traffic, which would allow for a bike/breakdown lane along with slowing down traffic.

Offline bigbrian24

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1394 on: December 28, 2017, 07:52:56 PM »
Most likely 1915,old school Chicago style. Looks like it is just to the left out of frame in the old pic. Maybe those shadows in the foreground are from the building?

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1395 on: January 01, 2018, 09:24:00 AM »
#Cleveland Of Years To Come (1922). Found @Cleveland_PL in Cleveland: A Prediction. It might have happened if not for the Great Depression and World War II.  Funny that they did not include the Terminal Tower complex which was  just about to start construction in 1922, although the tower itself was an afterthought. Cleveland had just become the nation's fifth-largest city in 1920, so this vision wasn't improbable.  https://t.co/YloSPKtG2z
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 09:28:44 AM by KJP »
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Offline David

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1396 on: January 01, 2018, 10:05:33 AM »
Moses Cleveland builded a great city!

Wow, look at that dense skyline.

Offline Cleburger

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1397 on: January 01, 2018, 10:08:38 AM »
#Cleveland Of Years To Come (1922). Found @Cleveland_PL in Cleveland: A Prediction. It might have happened if not for the Great Depression and World War II.  Funny that they did not include the Terminal Tower complex which was  just about to start construction in 1922, although the tower itself was an afterthought. Cleveland had just become the nation's fifth-largest city in 1920, so this vision wasn't improbable. 


What is the line of thinking on World War II slowing the growth of Cleveland?   I thought the war helped the city with its industrial might away from the coasts?  Or do you mean the white GI's running for the burbs after the war?


Offline David

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1398 on: January 01, 2018, 10:13:58 AM »
That picture is from 1922?! That's a vast number of what I think qualify as skyscrapers, for that time period.


Offline surfohio

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1399 on: January 01, 2018, 10:56:00 AM »
That picture is from 1922?! That's a vast number of what I think qualify as skyscrapers, for that time period.



Catch the vision!

Offline David

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1400 on: January 01, 2018, 11:27:07 AM »
Oh, it's an old-school rendering? It looks real.

I probably should have read the whole thing. I didn't go past the first sentence. I got distracted, wondering if "built" was a word back then.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 11:31:27 AM by David »

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1401 on: January 01, 2018, 11:53:12 AM »

What is the line of thinking on World War II slowing the growth of Cleveland?   I thought the war helped the city with its industrial might away from the coasts?  Or do you mean the white GI's running for the burbs after the war?


Nothing was being built during the war in the USA except guns, tanks, planes, bombs, etc. Most material that could be used for new structures (and cars, clothing, fuel, etc) was devoted to the war effort. Same with labor. If you weren't working in a business that was critical to the war effort, you got drafted into the military. It's also why you couldn't buy new cars, or gasoline (unless you had a ration card), or build houses or even buy nylon stockings (needed for parachutes) until after the war was over.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 11:55:31 AM by KJP »
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Online westerninterloper

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1402 on: January 01, 2018, 12:19:18 PM »

What is the line of thinking on World War II slowing the growth of Cleveland?   I thought the war helped the city with its industrial might away from the coasts?  Or do you mean the white GI's running for the burbs after the war?


Nothing was being built during the war in the USA except guns, tanks, planes, bombs, etc. Most material that could be used for new structures (and cars, clothing, fuel, etc) was devoted to the war effort. Same with labor. If you weren't working in a business that was critical to the war effort, you got drafted into the military. It's also why you couldn't buy new cars, or gasoline (unless you had a ration card), or build houses or even buy nylon stockings (needed for parachutes) until after the war was over.

Few US cities saw significant construction between 1929-1945, outside of some public works and a few buildings completed a year or so after the stock market crash. Even in the 1920s, there was significant suburbanization beginning with streetcar lines and then automobiles. I think of the dense urbanization of 1900-1950 as an aberration, not the norm; depopulation of cities after WWII contributed overall to better quality of life for most people. Rust Belt cities were dirty, crowded, polluted spaces by the 1950s. I would guess that a significant number of inner-city homes that were subject to urban renewal lacked basic plumbing. 

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1403 on: January 01, 2018, 12:55:06 PM »
I think of the dense urbanization of 1900-1950 as an aberration, not the norm; depopulation of cities after WWII contributed overall to better quality of life for most people.

While U.S. cities grew in population during the first 50 years of the 20th century, most of them became less dense because the walking city of the 19th century and before was more dense than the transit city. Depopulation did not lead to a better quality of life. Pollution control and housing codes/inspections did. Depopulation was a result of sprawl (in Cleveland's case, no-growth sprawl) and caused economic isolation of the poor and a new kind of pollution -- massive hyper-consumerist unrecycled garbage, carbon emissions from private vehicles and stormwater runoff from so much impervious surfaces.

EDIT: see Page 14 at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1538-4632.1975.tb01040.x/pdf
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 01:48:06 PM by KJP »
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1404 on: January 21, 2018, 12:03:48 AM »
34 stunning vintage shots of Coventry in the '80s https://t.co/8cCAvpNzOg
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1405 on: January 21, 2018, 12:20:06 AM »
14th & Huron, October 1988, Black Angus used to be on the corner, followed by the Rusty Scupper and Sweetwater Cafe. #Cleveland #ThisWasCle https://t.co/RFhjfeMvWn
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Online BigDipper 80

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1406 on: January 21, 2018, 08:23:46 AM »
Raging Wolf Bobs! It wasn’t the most thrilling roller coaster (or even anywhere near the bes at Geauga Lake) but it was one of Charlie Dinn’s few creations that didn’t actually bash you to death after the first year. He also built Mean Streak at Cedar Point, but I think only 3 or 4 of his rides are still in operation; the rest have either been modified into being steel roller coasters or were torn down.
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1407 on: January 21, 2018, 01:11:09 PM »
Raging Wolf Bobs bruised my shoulders pretty badly in the summer of '93.
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1408 on: January 23, 2018, 07:09:51 PM »
Loew's Park Theatre, 10209 Euclid Avenue opened 97 years ago yesterday, from the Plain Dealer, January 23, 1921. #Cleveland #ThisWasCle https://t.co/qpgyayW5YA
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Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Historic Photos
« Reply #1409 on: January 24, 2018, 11:19:17 PM »
You've probably seen a photo from @Cleve_Memory, you've probably used photos from @Cleve_Memory -- meet Bill Barrow, the Head of Special Collections at the Cleveland State Michael Schwartz library.
https://t.co/XniIFraiQg
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