Author Topic: Air Pollution  (Read 436 times)

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Offline buildingcincinnati

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2007, 01:39:30 AM »
From the 4/15/07 Dispatch:

TRACKING CO2 EMISSIONS
State EPA warms to pollution alliance
Strickland appointee backs climate registry

Sunday, April 15, 2007
Spencer Hunt
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH


While the world has debated global warming for decades, the agency sworn to protect Ohio's environment has remained stubbornly silent.  That might change.  The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is poised to take its first small step into the fray by considering joining the U.S. Climate Registry.

The multistate effort would ask businesses to track and report carbon-dioxide emissions, said Chris Korleski, who was named Ohio EPA director in January.  "It's a gentle introduction to global warming," he said.

Ohio has a big stake in the debate. Power plants, cars, trucks, factories and homes in the state released an estimated 287.3 million tons of carbon dioxide in 2003, enough to rank Ohio fourth in the U.S.  Critics say the U.S. EPA and the Department of Energy already provide emission estimates and that states need to instead limit carbon dioxide, a so-called greenhouse gas tied to warming and climate change.

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/04/15/20070415-C1-02.html
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:26:47 PM by rider »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2007, 08:31:25 PM »
Ohio EPA submits draft plan for Cincinnati area
June 18, 2007 | CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER

CINCINNATI - A proposal to bring Greater Cincinnati into compliance with federal clean air standards has been drafted by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

The plan was submitted Monday to the U.S. EPA, the Ohio EPA said in a news release. It includes requirements such as the use of cleaner paints, architectural coatings, portable gas cans and consumer products; and lower emissions from coal-burning power plants. The EPA already has replaced the E-Check emission testing with cleaner gasoline and other rules on local industries.

The Cincinnati area, including Hamilton, Butler, Clermont, Warren and Clinton counties, was rated as a "nonattainment area" in 2004, and has until June 2009 to come into full compliance with federal air standards.

The Ohio EPA will hold a hearing on the draft plan July 23, 2:30 p.m., at the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments office, 720 Pete Rose Way. For information on the plan, see www.epa.state.oh.us/dapc/, and click on "state implementation plan" under the "topics" drop-down box.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2007, 12:58:50 PM »
New rules aim for healthier air
Summer emissions in Greater Cincinnati targeted

BY MARGARET A. MCGURK | CINCINNATI ENQUIRER
July 2, 2007


CINCINNATI - Clean air comes from big solutions - such as the reformulated gas everyone around Cincinnati will be buying next summer.  But little things help, too.  Walk into a hardware store today to ask for a new gas can and what comes back might look strange.

Under a rule from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency that took effect Sunday, portable gas containers must be spill-proof and impermeable by vapor.  The regulations, based on California standards, call for a spout that shuts off when the container is full and that closes automatically when not in use.  In addition, the body of the container cannot allow any vapor to escape.

The results, which cost about twice as much as non-spill-proof versions, can feel a little clumsy, said Grant Kernan, a spokesman for Blitz USA, which makes fuel containers.  "Meeting those regulations called for a design that is not particularly intuitive," said Kernan.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:28:53 PM by rider »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #33 on: July 09, 2007, 08:41:12 PM »
Good Hair, Bad Air
Smog plan will regulate consumer products

BY DREW GIBSON | CITY BEAT
July 9, 2007


CINCINNATI - There is a direct connection between deodorants and hair-care products and smog, according to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA).  OEPA will hold a public hearing July 23 to outline its plans to bring the Cincinnati area into compliance with the federal Clean Air Act. One of the key aspects of this plan is "different formulations in consumer products that don't contribute to ozone production," says Heidi Griesmer, spokeswoman for OEPA.

The plan involves changing products such as adhesives, both aerosol and non-aerosol anti-perspirants, air fresheners, lighter fluid, furniture cleaners and various hair products to be more environmentally friendly.  "It requires the manufacturers to create the same products but with different formulations," Griesmer says.

The new formulations would have lower levels of volatile organic compounds, which contribute to the accumulation of ozone in the air.  "We have been regulating sources of ozone-causing emissions for decades, and standards get tighter," Griesmer says.  "We've already gone to the big manufacturers ... (who) are only responsible for 11 percent of the ozone problem."


The OEPA PUBLIC HEARING on its plan for Greater Cincinnati is at 2:30 p.m. July 23 at the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments, 720 Pete Rose Way, Downtown.  For a copy of the plan, visit epa.state.oh.us/dapc.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:29:50 PM by rider »

Offline noozer

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2007, 08:27:32 AM »
It's interesting that whenever these "smog alerts" are issued, the precautions include warning to the elderly or people with asthma, don't mow your lawn, don't fill you gas tank during the heat of the day, etc....

But when have you ever heard these warnings even suggest that people should refrain from doing the one thing that produces the majority of the smog in the first place.... driving their cars? Why not tell people to use mass transit or tele-commute on ozone alert days?  I even checked with my local MPO and even they don't make that suggestion when they issue the alerts in the first place.


With still half a year left, smog alerts tie '06 total
Wednesday,  July 11, 2007 3:40 AM
By Spencer Hunt
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH


After taking a few summers off, smog has settled back in central Ohio. So far this year, air-quality officials have announced six health alerts. That matches last year's total and comes at a time when families across the area are enjoying cookouts, the pool and sending their children to play summer sports.

There were eight alerts in 2005 and four in 2004, according to the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, which issues the warnings. Smog forms when hot weather, stagnant air and pollution from cars, trucks, power plants and factories converge.

Experts say there was one ingredient missing last summer. "We're having more hot days earlier," said Judy Kress of the Central Ohio Breathing Association. "And we're feeling the effects when that hot weather creates the smog."

All the alerts this year were for small children, seniors and people with breathing problems. Those susceptible are told to curtail outdoor activity or avoid going outside altogether.

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/07/11/smog.ART_ART_07-11-07_A1_HL78JR1.html
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:31:36 PM by rider »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #35 on: July 19, 2007, 01:26:40 PM »
Region now lone ozone violator
BY KEVIN EIGELBACH | CINCINNATI POST
July 19, 2007


Northern Kentucky soon will be the only region of the commonwealth that exceeds the federal eight-hour standard for ground-level ozone.  Last month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agreed that the Louisville metro area had met the standard.

The Kentucky Division for Air Quality has asked the EPA to find Boyd County - around Ashland, in northeastern Kentucky - in attainment as well, director John Lyons said.  He said he expects that to happen any time.  When it does, Northern Kentucky alone will be out of attainment.

The three Northern Kentucky counties of Boone, Kenton and Campbell are not the problem, Lyons said.  An ozone monitor in Warren County, Ohio, is.  "It just went over the standard again for the three-year period of '05, '06 and '07," Lyons said.  "They make this determination on an area-wide basis. All it takes is one monitor."

Kentucky regulators think the levels of ozone are actually decreasing in Northern Kentucky, but because the EPA considers the three counties as part of the Cincinnati metropolitan region and because air quality in southwest Ohio side doesn't meet the standard, they're technically on the non-attainment list.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:32:58 PM by rider »

Offline noozer

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2007, 09:40:27 PM »
Northeast Ohio may modify diesel engines to reduce soot

AKRON, Ohio (AP) -- Retrofitting diesel engines to make them cleaner may be the most significant step that northeast Ohio can take to reduce soot pollution in the air, and two regional planning agencies are considering recommending the potentially costly modifications.

The groups see the move as a way to help counties bring air quality standards into compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations by a 2010 deadline.

Northeast Ohio needs a framework in place to retrofit private and public diesel vehicles, said Jason Segedy of the Akron Metropolitan Area Transportation Study, which is compiling a list of recommendations for how the region can come into compliance with EPA standards for small particles in the air.

The fine particles come from diesel engines, coal-fired power plants and factory emissions and can be harmful because they settle deep inside the lungs, potentially causing breathing and heart problems. Children and the elderly are especially susceptible.

MORE: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/OH_SOOT_SOLUTIONS_OHOL-?SITE=WBNSTV&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:33:47 PM by rider »

Offline noozer

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2007, 08:47:46 PM »
SCIENCE
Going underground

Concerned that CO2 contributes to global warming, scientists drill a deep hole to see if they can bury the problem
Tuesday,  November 6, 2007 3:34 AM
By Kevin Mayhood
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH


Deep down, geologists believe Ohio has what it takes.  A preliminary look more than a mile and a half into the ground shows rock formations that might be able to hold carbon dioxide produced by coal-burning power plants, steelmakers and other manufacturers.

While the long-term future of coal is being debated, both sides say that as long as we burn the fossil fuel, pumping the carbon dioxide underground is much better than releasing it into the air.  Scientists say carbon dioxide is the key greenhouse gas that causes global warming.  Coal produces more carbon dioxide than other fuels to produce equal amounts of energy.

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, which includes Ohio, estimates there is enough underground storage capacity to hold hundreds of years' worth of carbon dioxide produced in a seven-state region.  "The results look promising at this location," said Philip Jagucki, program manger for carbon-dioxide sequestration at Battelle, which heads up the Ohio borehole project.

MORE: http://dispatch.com/live/content/science/stories/2007/11/06/sci_borehole.ART_ART_11-06-07_B4_NN8ARQL.html?sid=101
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:35:42 PM by rider »

Offline jessehallum

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2008, 12:19:44 PM »
LOWER OZONE STANDARD
New smog limits put Ohio on notice

Thursday,  March 13, 2008 3:29 AM
By H. Josef Hebert
 
WASHINGTON -- The air in hundreds of U.S. counties simply is too dirty to breathe, the government said yesterday, ordering a multibillion-dollar expansion of efforts to clean up smog in cities and towns nationwide.

The federal action, which lowers ozone limits for the atmosphere, means that 345 counties -- out of more than 700 that are monitored, including some in central Ohio -- now will be in violation of the health requirement, about four times as many as under the old rules.

Health experts say smog under the current ozone regulation -- even in areas where the limit is being met -- causes hundreds of premature deaths among the elderly and health problems for thousands of young children and people with asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

MORE: http://www.columbusdispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/03/13/ap_dirty_air.ART_ART_03-13-08_A1_SB9KK41.html?sid=101
« Last Edit: December 02, 2010, 03:38:00 PM by rider »

Offline KJP

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Re: Ohio air pollution
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2018, 01:01:10 PM »
Air pollution particles found in mothers' placentas
New research shows direct evidence that toxic air – already strongly linked to harm in unborn babies – travels through mothers’ bodies
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/16/air-pollution-particles-found-in-mothers-placentas
"Treat this (November 2018) election as if it's the last election in which you can fully exercise your democratic rights. Because it just might be." -- Margy Waller.