Author Topic: Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News  (Read 8771 times)

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Offline Toddguy

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Re: Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News
« Reply #270 on: July 13, 2018, 12:37:04 PM »
Now that this is 'on hold', is there any chance that the property involved with this project could be combined at some time with the strip mall at the intersection with High?

Are there any plans for that little strip mall? If they could combine these properties they could go higher right along High. I have hated that little strip mall for nearly 35 years since that restaurant at the corner was called the Toll House Inn and the Short North was ungentrified.

Offline ink

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Re: Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News
« Reply #271 on: July 13, 2018, 01:01:47 PM »
^Wood Companies owns that little strip mall, I believe. Unless they would acquire the Kaufman site, I see them holding onto the strip mall and High Street frontage for their own project in the future.

Online casey

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Re: Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News
« Reply #272 on: July 15, 2018, 12:18:56 PM »
Not shocked, this development did not fit the area where it was located and given it's surroundings.  If they would've scaled down to 5 stories and built something that was appropriate for the neighborhood it is in it would've been approved. But like my dad used to say they were "trying to fit 10lbs of sh*t in a 5lbs bag."  It didn't fit and I'm glad the neighborhood fought back as strong as they did.

First of all, a 9 story version was fully approved. So they could have just built that. There was almost no vocal opposition at the time. So this notion that something has to be 5 or less to "fit the neighborhood" is ridiculous

But, the real killer of this project I have to say has been Kaufman, not NIMBYs or the VVC. They're the ones who came back and opened a can of worms by seeking to alter the previous approval and revise the project to 14 stories. That brought people out of the woodwork, and they didn't really have any compelling story prepared to sell the benefits of a vastly larger project to the community

The fact that they ended up going back down to 10 in the latest version also demonstrates that they over-asked as far as what was really necessary to make the project viable. If they'd gone straight from the approved 9-story version and sought to change it to the final 10-story one from this month I think it would have passed easily, flying under the radar as a minor revision with no one being stirred up enough to come out and oppose it in meaningful numbers

Also, the other deadline they were working against was needing it approved this summer to avoid having to comply with the city's new affordable housing requirements for the Short North. This is one of the last really large development sites in the neighborhood, and now whatever project is eventually proposed and built here will also be providing a sizeable affordable housing component. That's the kind of added community benefit that I think could have swayed people into accepting a trade off for a somewhat denser or larger project because it is giving something more tangible back to the area as a result. Meaningful investment in public art would also be an example of such a benefit, neither of which we saw materialize with this project

Actively seeking to avoid the affordable housing rules is really what's putting this on ice right now more than anything else. That appears to be a hard deadline they were up against, which is now forcing them to regroup

Finally, Kaufman still owns this land. They weren't just exploring an option on it, they've already purchased it and spent several million dollars. They'll come back and propose something else to build here, or sell it to another developer who will. I supported this project, but it's not the end of the world to lose it

Offline wpcc88

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Re: Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News
« Reply #273 on: Yesterday at 01:25:15 PM »
Not shocked, this development did not fit the area where it was located and given it's surroundings.  If they would've scaled down to 5 stories and built something that was appropriate for the neighborhood it is in it would've been approved. But like my dad used to say they were "trying to fit 10lbs of sh*t in a 5lbs bag."  It didn't fit and I'm glad the neighborhood fought back as strong as they did.

First of all, a 9 story version was fully approved. So they could have just built that. There was almost no vocal opposition at the time. So this notion that something has to be 5 or less to "fit the neighborhood" is ridiculous

But, the real killer of this project I have to say has been Kaufman, not NIMBYs or the VVC. They're the ones who came back and opened a can of worms by seeking to alter the previous approval and revise the project to 14 stories. That brought people out of the woodwork, and they didn't really have any compelling story prepared to sell the benefits of a vastly larger project to the community

The fact that they ended up going back down to 10 in the latest version also demonstrates that they over-asked as far as what was really necessary to make the project viable. If they'd gone straight from the approved 9-story version and sought to change it to the final 10-story one from this month I think it would have passed easily, flying under the radar as a minor revision with no one being stirred up enough to come out and oppose it in meaningful numbers

Also, the other deadline they were working against was needing it approved this summer to avoid having to comply with the city's new affordable housing requirements for the Short North. This is one of the last really large development sites in the neighborhood, and now whatever project is eventually proposed and built here will also be providing a sizeable affordable housing component. That's the kind of added community benefit that I think could have swayed people into accepting a trade off for a somewhat denser or larger project because it is giving something more tangible back to the area as a result. Meaningful investment in public art would also be an example of such a benefit, neither of which we saw materialize with this project

Actively seeking to avoid the affordable housing rules is really what's putting this on ice right now more than anything else. That appears to be a hard deadline they were up against, which is now forcing them to regroup

Finally, Kaufman still owns this land. They weren't just exploring an option on it, they've already purchased it and spent several million dollars. They'll come back and propose something else to build here, or sell it to another developer who will. I supported this project, but it's not the end of the world to lose it

Basically what you just said is they got greedy, which is true.  However even at 9 stories the impact would've been felt.  This project at 3-4 stories on Price and up to 6 towards High would've gotten immediate approval and would've been appropriate.

*Side Note: LOL to the person who said that Kaufman uses high grade materials, look at 600 Goodale and their two projects downtown(the Commons is atrocious at best).  The project in Franklinton is by far their best and even it is questionable.