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Author Topic: Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News  (Read 5236 times)

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Offline theguv

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #150 on: June 21, 2008, 04:26:26 PM »
Developers buy Midtown Cleveland property
Posted by Michelle Jarboe June 20, 2008 15:03PM
Categories: Real estate

Developer Fred Geis has teamed up with the Coyne and Asher families to buy 6 acres in Midtown Cleveland for a project that could include shopping and offices or homes.

The deal, which closed in early May but was announced today, involved property at 6700 Euclid Ave., across from the Dunham Tavern Museum. The seller was Richard Cohen. Local Grubb & Ellis broker Terry Coyne represented his family and the other buyers in the transaction....
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 02:25:17 PM by McCleveland »

Offline MyTwoSense

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #151 on: June 21, 2008, 05:17:35 PM »
theguv...is there a link?

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #152 on: June 21, 2008, 08:12:50 PM »
That was already posted at "Filling In Euclid Avenue" but I suppose this thread is as appropriate as any.
America will never be destroyed from the outside. -- Abraham Lincoln.

Offline KJP

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #153 on: June 27, 2008, 01:35:55 PM »
http://blog.cleveland.com/cribnotes/2008/06/notes_on_midtown_cleveland.html

Notes on MidTown Cleveland
Posted by Michelle Jarboe June 27, 2008 08:00AM

The MidTown Cleveland economic development group had its annual meeting last week. I wasn't on the guest list, but the folks who do MidTown's PR were nice enough to pass along some video and other materials about the event...
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 02:25:56 PM by McCleveland »
America will never be destroyed from the outside. -- Abraham Lincoln.

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #154 on: August 20, 2008, 09:44:25 AM »
Agora complex to be revamped, expanded in deal expected Wednesday
by John Petkovic
Tuesday August 19, 2008, 7:26 PM

The club that helped turn Cleveland into the "Rock 'n' Roll Capital of the World" is close to getting an infusion of new blood and money...

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2008/08/deal_expected_to_be_announced.html
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 02:27:36 PM by McCleveland »

Offline ExSpectator36

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #155 on: August 22, 2008, 10:01:22 AM »
For anyone interested, there is a free MidTown Cleveland Security Fair going on at Applied Technologies (E. 36th & Euclid) going on right now until 1:00.  Lunch is said to be provided.  I'm about to walk over there myself.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2008, 10:06:43 AM by ExSpectator36 »

Offline ExSpectator36

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #156 on: September 16, 2008, 11:04:32 AM »
I was just at the midtown bloc party in the courtyard behind 4500 Euclid today, they had a rather impressive array of food, some music, and a bunch of health related booths set up inside.  There seemed to be a fair amount of people attending.

Offline FerrariEnzo

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #157 on: September 16, 2008, 09:28:40 PM »
I am so pumped LaConti isnt selling out to live nation!  I hate those pigs... Ive partnered with some buddies to produce shows in Columbus at independent venues such as Veterans Memorial etc and loved it, came up here to Cleveland and was looking at a few venues all of which (aside from agora) are coroprate owned and dont like dealing with "small fries".  Stick it to em'!  Still trying to get Bloc Parties booking party to get off his live nation crack-like addiction and let me do a show with them...
p.s. just so you know how good this is for the CLEVELAND music scene.  Live nation likes to put on shows only that go to multiple venues (all belonging to them of course) and often times shut down independent producers trying to bring in different acts to town for just one performance in one city.  Ill put it this way, if your pop and the CEO has heard of you, green light.  Anything off the beatin' path... good luck.

Offline 327

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #158 on: October 01, 2008, 04:02:34 PM »
This could go into several different threads, hope I have the most appropriate one...

There has been a lot of talk about developing CC/UH-related health and tech all up and down Euclid, particularly in the Midtown area.  We've got a 24-hr transit line there and a setup that encourages pedestrians over cars.  Sounds ideal for mass residential, and for entertainment.  Also sounds underutilized if surrounded by secured 9-5 offices.  Meanwhile residential projects great and small are lining up for the 8 lane sub-freeway that is Chester.  I suggest a switcheroo.

The Agora theater could anchor a killer new neighborhood for young people.  It consistently draws people who are seeing the inner city for the first time and seem to like it.  With another venue or two (smaller ones) and some apartment construction, this could be a showpiece neighborhood.  Have a musicians' village all living together and sharing ideas.  It capitalizes on the city's musical heritage and replants it for another generation.  Chester and Carnegie are car-oriented and better suited for what amounts to modern light industry.  Euclid should be inviting and alive with people.  The core attraction is already there.

Any thoughts?
« Last Edit: October 01, 2008, 09:29:12 PM by 327 »

Offline jpop

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #159 on: November 04, 2008, 07:30:58 AM »
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/cuyahoga/1225791059125390.xml&coll=2
Developer Dick Pace restoring Baker electric car showroom into offices
Baker electric car site to become offices
Tuesday, November 04, 2008 / Michael O'Malley / Plain Dealer Reporter

At night, they would glimmer under the glow of hanging lamps -- the coupe, the brougham, the roadster -- all battery-powered cars displayed through big showroom windows for the eyes of high society...
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 02:28:13 PM by McCleveland »

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #160 on: June 02, 2009, 11:58:50 AM »
From Medcity about a new study being done:

http://www.medcitynews.com/index.php/2009/06/cleveland-considers-a-cluster-health-care-technology-and-can-it-be-done/

Cleveland considers a cluster. Health care? Technology? And can it be done?
June 2, 2009 by Chris Seper   
Filed under Feature, Innovation, Top Story


Euclid Avenue: A strip of opportunities and challenges


CLEVELAND, Ohio — Members of the health-care industry, public officials and business interests have launched a study to see whether space between the edge of Cleveland’s downtown and the hospital-heavy University Circle neighborhood could be a hub for medical business.

The study will look mostly at the “HealthLine” — a three-mile stretch of Euclid Avenue bookended by a neighborhood that includes Cleveland State University, St. Vincent Charity Hospital and Cuyahoga Community College on one end, and by Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University on the other. The study also will examine the areas around those end points and portions of E. 55th Street next to Euclid Avenue, as well as the role of the Port of Cleveland.

Angelou Economics, a Texas economic consulting firm, started the study in mid-May to determine whether that area could create a focused biomedical cluster in the tradition of North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park, or whether it should be broadened to include all innovation and technology companies.

The firm’s final recommendations and an implementation strategy should be done by September, said Jim Colson, the company’s chief operating officer.

An array of organizations — city and county governments, the Cleveland Port Authority, biotech advocate BioEnterprise and the non-profit Cleveland Foundation — are participating in and funding the study. BioEnterprise President Baiju Shah said the region already has created a vibrant collection of businesses and medical research that has yet to reach its potential.“We’ve struggled to create the energy because we have sprawl,” Shah said. “We have companies hidden away in different parts of our region that aren’t easily connected with one another or the [medical] institutions.”

Clustering can be geographic or by interests. Michigan, for example, ”clustered” its top medical universities — though they’re hours apart from one another — to better collaborate on and spin off commercially viable medical research. Akron launched a biomedical corridor project based on its concentration of polymer, engineering and orthopaedic research, among other things.

Euclid Avenue has its mix of opportunities and challenges. Cleveland Clinic gradually has expanded along Euclid Avenue anyway — it is in negotiations to purchase the Cleveland Playhouse, one of the large masses of well-kept properties on the street. However, many patches of the street are peppered with abandoned and toxic properties that could make a true “connection” between sides difficult.

Plus, some research say it’s less clear whether clusters can help increase jobs as much as they aid businesses that join the clusters. Sometimes, jobs created by businesses in a cluster are created somewhere else.

Shah said the health services around University Circle have outgrown that area. “How do we create a vision for what happens in 10 years that really creates a health corridor around the two major poles [University Circle and Cleveland State-area] and that takes advantage of the transformation of the HealthLine?” he asked.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 12:12:04 PM by MuRrAy HiLL »

Offline Oldmanladyluck

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #161 on: June 02, 2009, 12:13:43 PM »
^This is the type of discussion the city should have in regards to this area.  This strip has massive potential.

Online StapHanger

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #162 on: June 02, 2009, 04:25:20 PM »
Shah said the health services around University Circle have outgrown that area.

This commonly held view pretty much sums up the problems with UC land use.  The Clinic is surrounded by many acres of surface parking and plans all new buildings with generous front lawns.  UH, as I understand it, is creating a new park on Euclid to bank a large empty lot.  These institutions already own more land than they know what do with. 

Thumbs up to a cluster of property tax paying developments centered around medical technology.  Thumbs down for treating midtown as just an extension of undisciplined institutional sprawl.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 04:25:47 PM by StrapHanger »

Offline punch

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #163 on: June 03, 2009, 06:38:51 AM »
Didn't they just complete a Midtown master plan?  Are they looking to change it already?

Offline w28th

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #164 on: June 03, 2009, 07:02:53 AM »
They did, and it could be substituted by any other master plan done for a green field suburban site.

Offline Oldmanladyluck

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #165 on: June 03, 2009, 08:15:56 AM »
This is a link to Midtown's masterplan, from the Midtown Cleveland website.  The plan was completed in 2005.

http://www.midtowncleveland.org/data/pdf/MTC%20master%20plan-zoning%20summaries.pdf

Offline McCleveland

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #166 on: June 08, 2009, 02:10:31 PM »
hmmm... steel is in the air at East 83rd and carnegie (NW Corner)... I still have no idea what this is and there is no world class signage up to let me know.  :)

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #167 on: June 08, 2009, 02:13:48 PM »
nothing to do with the Juvenile Justice Complex...correct?  I'm thinking that is on Quincy

Offline McCleveland

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #168 on: June 08, 2009, 02:16:27 PM »
nope... this is right across from the Cleveland Playhouse on Carnegie.

Offline 3231

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #169 on: June 08, 2009, 02:25:29 PM »
That is going to be some sort of arab/lebanese (not sure which) grocery and restaurant/cafe. It was announced a couple of years ago.

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #170 on: June 08, 2009, 02:32:21 PM »
^^ah yes, I remember now!...it's been in the works for a while.  It is in fact going to be a grocery store.  I had a conversation with someone "in the know" and it was referred to as "middle eastern."  I believe the eastside Mosque is nearby, correct?.  BIG addition to the area.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 02:33:03 PM by MuRrAy HiLL »

Offline McCleveland

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #171 on: June 08, 2009, 02:36:19 PM »
well i hope it's sited well...

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #172 on: June 08, 2009, 02:39:58 PM »
Here's something from 2007...

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/crr06-18-07.htm


9:30    Ward 6
Calendar No. 07-78:  2040 East 83rd Street Patricia Britt 
     
East 83rd and Carnegie LLC, owner and Ali Lofti Fard, appeal to construct a one-story grocery store and restaurant, proposed to be situated on consolidated parcels located in split zoning between General Retail Business and Multi-Family Districts on the west side of East 83rd Street at 2040 East 83rd Street; subject to the limitations of Section 337.08, a grocery store is not permitted in a Multi-Family District; and contrary to Sections 352.10 and 352.11, a 4’ wide frontage landscape strip is proposed where a 6’ width is required along the parking lot on East 83rd Street and Section 325.03 stipulates that parking spaces shall be at least 180 square feet and accessory uses shall be no less than 10’ from the side street line according to Section 357.05 of the Codified Ordinances. (Filed 5-15-07)

Obviously outdated...but the names might help.

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #173 on: June 08, 2009, 02:44:21 PM »
OK, I'm on a googling frenzy:

http://www.freetimes.com/stories/15/41/quothalf-the-world-is-here

Half The World Is Here
An Economics Student Turned Butcher Serves His Own Growing Community, And Many Others
By Jo Steigerwald

Once a week, Mr. Ali Lotfi-fard, an Iranian-born Muslim, drives to Bristol, Ohio, just a jog south of Middlefield. His destination: a slaughterhouse where Amish workers will help him corral the beef on the hoof needed for the week. Mr. Lotfi-fard is a halal butcher, whose store at West 95th and Detroit packs the world between its walls.

Tinned mackerel from Izola, Slovenia. Rice from Pakistan; rice from Thailand. Moroccan sardines. Feta cheese: French, Bulgarian, Romanian. The most fragrant green tea with jasmine from Karachi, Pakistan. Goya-brand beans and recaito. Dettol, the antiseptic cleaner mentioned in seemingly every contemporary novel from India. A phalanx of silver and gold hookah pipes. Henna hair dye. Tea samovars and china; liters of Pepsi, boxes of corn flakes. And during Ramadan, the cases of medjool dates are stacked as high as a man.

Want to know how a city grows? Watch what it eats. Cleveland, long a bastion of pierogis (or piroshke or pyrohy, depending on which side of what Eastern European border your great-grandmother traveled from), is now enriched by a conflation of Arabic, African and Asian tastes - all of whom have among them the commonality of a fast-growing religion, Islam.

Mr. Lotfi-fard (whom everyone calls Ali) and his wife, Paradise, immigrated to the United States in 1977. They came to escape the revolution brewing in Iran that ended with the overthrow of the reigning monarchy and the establishment of an Islamic republic under the Ayatollah Khomeini. Ali studied economics at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland State, worked several jobs and raised a family of four sons with Paradise.

How did a student of economics become a butcher? Market demand. There was a dearth of halal butchers in Cleveland in the late '70s, and so Ali started Halal Meats to provide acceptable meat for his family. Then for friends. Finally, he and Paradise opened the store at 9418 Detroit in 1983.

"Halal means lawful, or permitted," explains Ali. "One takes the life of an animal with intention and respect in a humane way, and one invokes the name of God. A halal butcher must be intentional; must be humane; and must invoke the name of God." Like the kosher designation for Jews, halal signifies the divine present in the everyday, where God is in the details. Unlike kosher standards, a halal certification does not require its butchers to be overseen by a mosque official; it is enough that they are Muslim.

In addition to the beef from Bristol, Halal Meats has goat, lamb and chicken, whole or cut to order. His assistant, Noor Najmiah, who sports a pompadour that would make a rockabilly front man proud, travels to Detroit once a week for halal chicken, bakery and most of the store's grocery stock. "It used to be that the distributors delivered to us," says Paradise. "But since the price of gas is so high, we must go to them. Most of what is in the store we get from Detroit, which has a large Arabic community."

According to the American Religious Identity Survey, conducted in 2001 by the City University of New York with a sample size of 50,000 Americans, Islam ranks third on the list of the top 20 religions in the United States. Since 1980, the proportion of mosques founded in this country had increased by 62 percent, according to a 2001 study from the Hartford Institute for Religious Research.

Of course, Muslims have come to the United States for much longer than the past 30 years. Paradise tells this story: "About 15 years ago, there was an old Iranian man who came to the store, maybe twice. He had come to this country long ago, probably in the early 1900s. The second time he was in the store, he brought some things his mother gave him to take with him to America. He said his family wasn't interested in them and he wanted to give them to me. There was a magnificent prayer rug, a string of prayer beads, and two books. The one book was the Koran. He didn't know what the other book was, he couldn't read it." It was a cookbook. Humanity needs nourishment, physical and spiritual.

A prohibition on eating pork is part of the Muslim faith, as are drinking alcohol and gambling, which is one reason Ali won't sell beer or lottery tickets. The other? "If it's not good for my family," says Ali, "it's not good for yours. People tell me I'd make a lot of money in this neighborhood if I sold alcohol and lottery tickets. But it's not just about making money."

In fact, for most of Halal Meat's history, Ali has worked at other jobs and owned other businesses in order to support his family. "I don't do this for the money. I started this because there was no halal meat here for my family. Then friends wanted some. So, there was a demand; a market." He shrugs. "It was important to me to make it available."

This availability now includes supplying several Indian and Turkish restaurants in Northeast Ohio. And within the next month, Ali will break ground for a new store at East 83rd, between Euclid and Carnegie, next to the Cleveland Playhouse and down the block from the Cleveland Clinic. Named after the mystic Sufi poet, Rumi International Foods will feature prepared foods, a food court and halal catering services, in addition to halal meats and groceries.

At the original store, Ali takes phone orders: one whole goat, two lambs. He makes change for a sweet, lumbering man who gives out Catholic holy cards; totals up two liters of pop, dish soap and 25 pounds of flour, entering it into his book of store credit. He sells a $15 phone card for Africa and confers with Paradise.

"When customers are waiting, I tell them, look around you! Half the world is here! There's Somalia. Romania. Turkey, Egypt, Morocco. Pakistan. Iran."

All shopping for blessed meat, spices, dish soap and pop. The world goes to Ali's store and smiles.

Offline MuRrAy HiLL

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #174 on: June 10, 2009, 12:30:49 PM »
http://www.cleveland.com/goingout/index.ssf/2009/06/clevelands_agora_theater_and_b.html

Cleveland's Agora Theater and Ballroom to close for summer: After Dark
by John Petkovic / Plain Dealer Reporter
Wednesday June 10, 2009, 1:35 PM

"I'm closing for three months -- June, July and August," said Hank LoConti, owner of the Agora Theater and Ballroom, 5000 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. "I'm still renting the place for shows that other promoters are doing, but I'm not booking shows until September."...

« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 02:29:42 PM by McCleveland »

Offline doctabroccoli

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #175 on: June 10, 2009, 01:05:31 PM »
OK, I'm on a googling frenzy:

http://www.freetimes.com/stories/15/41/quothalf-the-world-is-here

Half The World Is Here
An Economics Student Turned Butcher Serves His Own Growing Community, And Many Others
By Jo Steigerwald

Once a week, Mr. Ali Lotfi-fard, an Iranian-born Muslim, drives to Bristol, Ohio, just a jog south of Middlefield. His destination: a slaughterhouse where Amish workers will help him corral the beef on the hoof needed for the week. Mr. Lotfi-fard is a halal butcher, whose store at West 95th and Detroit packs the world between its walls.

Tinned mackerel from Izola, Slovenia. Rice from Pakistan; rice from Thailand. Moroccan sardines. Feta cheese: French, Bulgarian, Romanian. The most fragrant green tea with jasmine from Karachi, Pakistan. Goya-brand beans and recaito. Dettol, the antiseptic cleaner mentioned in seemingly every contemporary novel from India. A phalanx of silver and gold hookah pipes. Henna hair dye. Tea samovars and china; liters of Pepsi, boxes of corn flakes. And during Ramadan, the cases of medjool dates are stacked as high as a man.

Want to know how a city grows? Watch what it eats. Cleveland, long a bastion of pierogis (or piroshke or pyrohy, depending on which side of what Eastern European border your great-grandmother traveled from), is now enriched by a conflation of Arabic, African and Asian tastes - all of whom have among them the commonality of a fast-growing religion, Islam.

Mr. Lotfi-fard (whom everyone calls Ali) and his wife, Paradise, immigrated to the United States in 1977. They came to escape the revolution brewing in Iran that ended with the overthrow of the reigning monarchy and the establishment of an Islamic republic under the Ayatollah Khomeini. Ali studied economics at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland State, worked several jobs and raised a family of four sons with Paradise.

How did a student of economics become a butcher? Market demand. There was a dearth of halal butchers in Cleveland in the late '70s, and so Ali started Halal Meats to provide acceptable meat for his family. Then for friends. Finally, he and Paradise opened the store at 9418 Detroit in 1983.

"Halal means lawful, or permitted," explains Ali. "One takes the life of an animal with intention and respect in a humane way, and one invokes the name of God. A halal butcher must be intentional; must be humane; and must invoke the name of God." Like the kosher designation for Jews, halal signifies the divine present in the everyday, where God is in the details. Unlike kosher standards, a halal certification does not require its butchers to be overseen by a mosque official; it is enough that they are Muslim.

In addition to the beef from Bristol, Halal Meats has goat, lamb and chicken, whole or cut to order. His assistant, Noor Najmiah, who sports a pompadour that would make a rockabilly front man proud, travels to Detroit once a week for halal chicken, bakery and most of the store's grocery stock. "It used to be that the distributors delivered to us," says Paradise. "But since the price of gas is so high, we must go to them. Most of what is in the store we get from Detroit, which has a large Arabic community."

According to the American Religious Identity Survey, conducted in 2001 by the City University of New York with a sample size of 50,000 Americans, Islam ranks third on the list of the top 20 religions in the United States. Since 1980, the proportion of mosques founded in this country had increased by 62 percent, according to a 2001 study from the Hartford Institute for Religious Research.

Of course, Muslims have come to the United States for much longer than the past 30 years. Paradise tells this story: "About 15 years ago, there was an old Iranian man who came to the store, maybe twice. He had come to this country long ago, probably in the early 1900s. The second time he was in the store, he brought some things his mother gave him to take with him to America. He said his family wasn't interested in them and he wanted to give them to me. There was a magnificent prayer rug, a string of prayer beads, and two books. The one book was the Koran. He didn't know what the other book was, he couldn't read it." It was a cookbook. Humanity needs nourishment, physical and spiritual.

A prohibition on eating pork is part of the Muslim faith, as are drinking alcohol and gambling, which is one reason Ali won't sell beer or lottery tickets. The other? "If it's not good for my family," says Ali, "it's not good for yours. People tell me I'd make a lot of money in this neighborhood if I sold alcohol and lottery tickets. But it's not just about making money."

In fact, for most of Halal Meat's history, Ali has worked at other jobs and owned other businesses in order to support his family. "I don't do this for the money. I started this because there was no halal meat here for my family. Then friends wanted some. So, there was a demand; a market." He shrugs. "It was important to me to make it available."

This availability now includes supplying several Indian and Turkish restaurants in Northeast Ohio. And within the next month, Ali will break ground for a new store at East 83rd, between Euclid and Carnegie, next to the Cleveland Playhouse and down the block from the Cleveland Clinic. Named after the mystic Sufi poet, Rumi International Foods will feature prepared foods, a food court and halal catering services, in addition to halal meats and groceries.

At the original store, Ali takes phone orders: one whole goat, two lambs. He makes change for a sweet, lumbering man who gives out Catholic holy cards; totals up two liters of pop, dish soap and 25 pounds of flour, entering it into his book of store credit. He sells a $15 phone card for Africa and confers with Paradise.

"When customers are waiting, I tell them, look around you! Half the world is here! There's Somalia. Romania. Turkey, Egypt, Morocco. Pakistan. Iran."

All shopping for blessed meat, spices, dish soap and pop. The world goes to Ali's store and smiles.


Oh man, I am soooooo there.

Offline 327

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #176 on: June 10, 2009, 01:40:45 PM »
On the Agora:  I'm glad the Jigsaw misadventure didn't do any more damage than it did.  Very sad they'd close for the summer... if only there were a small entertainment district around it to add some summer foot traffic... Beachland and Grog Shop aren't closing for the summer, so it's not an industry thing.  It's a Midtown thing.  Building a research park nearby is not going to help this situation.  It only will further isolate what should be viewed as a premier attraction for this city.  That's right, we're the home of Rock & Roll, but we're going to develop a sterile environment around our most venerable rock club as if it's not even there.  Madness.

On the grocery store:  That is the worst urban zoning code imaginable.  Wow.  Let's examine:

"a grocery store is not permitted in a Multi-Family District"

"frontage landscape strip... a 6’ width is required along the parking lot"

"parking spaces shall be at least 180 square feet and accessory uses shall be no less than 10’ from the side street line"

All these bad decisions we keep complaining about have been required by Cleveland law.  If we're going to keep those laws on the books there's no sense in trying to redevelop anything.  The zoning code must change.  It must change and it must change NOW.  It is the A#1 overwhelming reason the wrong things get built here, in the wrong manner and in the wrong places.  We have got to do something about this and it is urgent.  Extremely simple, but urgent.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 02:08:54 PM by 327 »

Offline X

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #177 on: June 10, 2009, 02:22:09 PM »
The Agora closing for the summer is indeed an industry thing.  Summers are a tough time for midsized venues like the Agora, as outdoor shows suck up several bands each that could otherwise headline a midsize venue.  Beachland and Grog Shop are different sizes from the Agora, much smaller, and aren't drawing from the same set of bands.  They have a much larger set they can draw from to fill their venues, including many small local bands.  Also, their overhead is much lower.  I don't know about the Beachland, but I bet the Grog can open up just as a bar for the evening and still make some money- not an option for the Agora.

Offline willyboy

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #178 on: June 10, 2009, 02:32:30 PM »
On the grocery store:  That is the worst urban zoning code imaginable.  Wow.  Let's examine:

"a grocery store is not permitted in a Multi-Family District"

"frontage landscape strip... a 6’ width is required along the parking lot"

"parking spaces shall be at least 180 square feet and accessory uses shall be no less than 10’ from the side street line"

All these bad decisions we keep complaining about have been required by Cleveland law.  If we're going to keep those laws on the books there's no sense in trying to redevelop anything.  The zoning code must change.  It must change and it must change NOW.  It is the A#1 overwhelming reason the wrong things get built here, in the wrong manner and in the wrong places.  We have got to do something about this and it is urgent.  Extremely simple, but urgent.

Also, shouldn't these types of things be guided towards some sort of "culinary district" like has been mentioned for the area around the West Side Market or other areas, where the idea would be to group various culinary/International food stores etc., to create a bustling district?  I guess the city is more interested in this scattered auto-centric approach.       

Offline X

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Re: Cleveland: Midtown Developments
« Reply #179 on: June 10, 2009, 02:40:45 PM »
I don't think the City decided where these private investors were going to put their business.  I'm guessing the private investors decided where to put it, and that they wanted to be close to the large South and West Asian communities associated with the hospitals.