Author Topic: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA  (Read 1131 times)

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Offline ColDayMan

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Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« on: February 07, 2007, 12:36:59 PM »


In the Eye of the Beholder
Public, Designers at Odds On What's a Beautiful Building


By ALEX FRANGOS
February 7, 2007; Page B1

It's a question that has divided architects for centuries: What makes a great building? Can it be found in the formal columns of Thomas Jefferson's University of Virginia in Charlottesville, or the delicate glass walls of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Seagram Building in Manhattan, or the constantly changing mechanical skin of Thom Mayne's Caltrans building in Los Angeles?

For more information, click the below link.


Corrections & Amplifications

The U.S. Capitol is No. 6 on the AIA's list of most popular architecture and the Lincoln Memorial is No. 7. Camden Yards is No. 122. An earlier version of this article and a chart published with it had incorrectly switched the ranks of the Capitol and the Lincoln Memorial, and the article had incorrectly said Camden Yards was ranked No. 120. The above article and chart have been corrected.

FAVORITE ARCHITECTS


The American Institute of Architects survey reflects America's enduring love for Frank Lloyd Wright, whose buildings appear eight times on the list, more than any other. Richard Meier leads all living architects with five buildings.

Frank Lloyd Wright 8
Henry Hobson Richardson 6
Philip Johnson 5
Richard Meier 5
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Bruce Graham) 5
Cass Gilbert 3
Daniel Burnham 3
Eero Saarinen 3
Henry Janeway Hardenbergh 3
Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue 2
Frank Gehry 2
John Portman 2
John Russell Pope 2
McKim, Mead, and White 2
Michael Graves 2
NBBJ 2
Pei Cobb Freed & Partners (James Ingo Freed) 2
Thomas Jefferson 2
Wallace K. Harrison 2


The Top 150 List

http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/info-poparch07-sort2.html

Of note, besides Paul Brown, Union Terminal was voted #44.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 04:54:14 PM by ColDayMan »
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Offline 3231

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2007, 12:44:57 PM »
I like PBS a lot. Definitely a nice stadium to look at as you drive by. 

Of course this is all very subjective, but the list is so heavily tilted towards the big cities. It overlooks a lot of the beautiful old buildings in the midsize cities.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2007, 01:09:03 PM »
I find it interesting that no other city in OH, KY, IN had a bldg listed in the top 150 bldgs...Cincy had 2!!

*chants: we're #1, we're #1*

Offline 3231

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2007, 01:18:40 PM »
Looking through the top 150, there are some very suspect buildings. It takes the luster off of being mentioned in the list.  Cincy's two buildings are very deserving, though. 

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2007, 01:34:46 PM »
^Oh, I totally agree!  I was just poking fun about the situation....however I do feel there are some other bldgs withing Ohio that are worthy of making the list.

Offline BallHatGuy

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2007, 01:58:38 PM »
As a member of the AIA, I submitted buildings for consideration as a response to the survey they mentioned and I received.  I submitted a number of local buildings - City Hall, Music Hall, Union Terminal, Plum Street Temple, St. Peter-in-Chains to make sure we had some local representation.  I also included some other favs not in Cincinnati - Trinity Church, Boston; Glessner House, Chicago; Allegheny County Courthouse, Pittsburgh; Cleveland Arcade, Cleveland.

I am puzzled by the inclusion of some (The Bellagio?) and the ones that I consider missing from the list.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 02:00:22 PM by BallHatGuy »

Offline 3231

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2007, 02:06:18 PM »
Then there are buildings that are great because of those who inhabit them, not for the actual structure. Some may disagree, but I don't see Yankee Stadium as a great piece of architecture. Sure its interesting, but its not great. It may be the best place to place baseball, but that's because of the Yankees, their history and the fans.

Offline ink

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2007, 02:32:07 PM »
Based on the current state of architecture/construction, it is hard to see credibility in a survey of today's architects.

Cincinnati's are both great structures however.

Offline BallHatGuy

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2007, 02:59:47 PM »
Ink!

Just because what you see in the current state of architecture and construction, it does NOT diminish the credibility of an architect to make an opinion on what constitutes good architecture.  We went to school to study architecture and design, have training in the practical field, been practicing in that field, etc, etc.  So much comes in to play on what a contemporary building ultimately is and becomes such as money first and foremost.  I worked on a CPS school.  Is it the best design in the world?  No.  But many things were factors in what it looks like.   It doesn't make me any less a person to submit my opinion.  In fact we are far better qualified than most.  Now I didn't agree with all those buildings either and why someone would list them is beyond me.

Please don't read to much in tone here, just making a point :) although I may sound harsh - I'm really not.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2007, 03:10:04 PM »
Uhhh...I think we all can agree that Planners are really the only ones who know what they're talking about...for anything!  :wink:

Offline ink

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2007, 05:20:32 PM »
Uhhh...I think we all can agree that Planners are really the only ones who know what they're talking about...for anything!  :wink:

I think the 50's, 60's, 70's kind of ruined credibility for planners too! :lol:

But I have a feeling WE will bring it back!
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 05:38:01 PM by inkaelin »

Offline ink

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2007, 05:34:07 PM »
Ink!

...


I know what you are saying and I'm sure you are right for a number of architects. Although everytime any amazing, expensive new building goes up anymore, it is crap. Everytime I walk through an architecture department and see student models, they look like crap. While I'm sure most of what is build today ends up that way because of cost and desires of the developers, I'm still not convinced that there isn't a school of architects who believe that the Steed Hammond Pauls or the Voorhis, Slone, Welsh, Crosslands or even the Frank Gentrys is good architecture, but in my non educated view, these uninspiring, undramatic buildings aren't worth more than whats going on inside. All through junior high and high school, I wanted to go into architecture, but I finally woke up and realized the state of the art today, and ran away from it. Plus, it didn't help that OSU's program was in that new marble zebra thingie.  :lol: This is also when I realized preservation was the only way to save our physical landscape, and thus my interest in that has exploded.

Same with the tone, I'm just talking casually.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 05:37:10 PM by inkaelin »

Offline 3231

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2007, 05:38:53 PM »

I think the 50's, 60's, 70's kind of ruined credibility for planners


The 50s, 60s and 70s also ruined the credibility of architects!

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2007, 06:48:23 PM »
^and city government, federal government, etc, etc....Lets just all agree that those were terrible times for cities, with many people to blame!

Offline RiverViewer

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2007, 10:18:00 PM »
The survey doesn't say what the best buildings are - it says what people in general think are the best buildings.  Definitely can be a big difference!  But we should keep in mind that when architects and the public agree - say, in the Ascent - that it makes for a fantastic, and well-supported project!

Offline ink

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2007, 11:00:05 PM »
The survey doesn't say what the best buildings are - it says what people in general think are the best buildings.  Definitely can be a big difference! 

How do you distinguish the two? Whos to say what the best buildings really are?

Offline 3231

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2007, 11:06:16 PM »
^you'll never have a survey of that states what the best buildings are.  Architects, while obviously the most knowledgeable, seem to be one step too close to the topic to have any real perspective on the effects of a building on the city as a whole.

Offline kevmr25

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2007, 06:41:19 PM »
No terminal Tower?

Offline redbuck

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2007, 08:55:38 PM »
Keep in mind that what the AIA focuses on is not what most fans and observers notice. Petco Park is architecturally renowned but among baseball and ballpark circles it is a more or less average park. While the AIA may note a stadium for its impressive use of glass on an external facade, that really means nothing to fans who are looking for good sightlines, wide concourses and who are willing to sacrifice a lot of architectural creativity for functionality.

Offline thomasbw

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2007, 08:57:16 PM »

I think the 50's, 60's, 70's kind of ruined credibility for planners


The 50s, 60s and 70s also ruined the credibility of architects!

the 50s 60s and 70s ruined the united states of america.

Offline thomasbw

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2007, 08:57:47 PM »
^except for the civil rights movement, voting rights act, man on the moon, etc.

Offline redbuck

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2007, 09:03:36 PM »
Well, as poorly as the 50s through 70s are viewed in terms of architecture, we now see some great international style buildings. While some of the skyscrapers and schools are quite ugly, that style did bridge well older building types and new technology and has allowed for postmodernism to take off. Keep in mind that a lot of cities' skylines are defined by buildings from that era. Chicago, for instance, is far more interesting with the Hancock and the Sears, but its 1960s boxy apartment buildings are at the same time one of the negative spots of the city.

Offline David

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2007, 09:14:50 PM »
^except for the civil rights movement, voting rights act, man on the moon, etc.
Nice save, lmao

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Offline David

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2018, 02:08:40 PM »
You think it'd be worth it, though?

I was reading an article recently about how no one wants to host the Olympics anymore. It's too much of a headache and it ends up costing the cities more money than the revenue it brings in. They've been getting less and less bids for that event. In fact, I think for the latest one up for grabs, they only received bids from two cities and they were pretty obscure cities.

It certainly puts your city on the map but most people don't care about that. 

Perhaps the World Cup is a little different. I don't know. I'm not that big on sports.

Offline LAW 21

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2018, 08:00:08 PM »
You think it'd be worth it, though?

I was reading an article recently about how no one wants to host the Olympics anymore. It's too much of a headache and it ends up costing the cities more money than the revenue it brings in. They've been getting less and less bids for that event. In fact, I think for the latest one up for grabs, they only received bids from two cities and they were pretty obscure cities.

It certainly puts your city on the map but most people don't care about that. 

Perhaps the World Cup is a little different. I don't know. I'm not that big on sports.

The problem with the Olympics is that you basically need to build an entire village to support it.  Once the games are over, you suddenly have a vacant village and that obviously has a negative effect on the rest of city.  It's basically impossible to have a positive roi.

I'm not too familiar with what goes into the world cup, but I think Cincinnati is only going to be in one of the opening rounds, so there's not really any significant cost involved.

Offline David

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2018, 04:20:17 AM »
Right!

After I wrote that post, I was at work, realizing what the difference might be. For the Olympics, you're almost always required to build brand new, larger stadiums to accommodate the crowd. Those stadiums are essentially useless or unnecessary after the Olympics. They become abandoned. If Paul Brown Stadium is ideal for the World Cup, then there's no need to worry about that. They'd just be utilizing a stadium that currently exists, so that's the difference.

That would be really cool if Cincinnati gets it. Cincinnati has a lot of Soccer fans, for some reason.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2018, 04:24:35 AM by David »

Online jmecklenborg

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Re: Paul Brown Stadium: Top Football Stadium by the AIA
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2018, 12:00:24 PM »
60 2026 World Cup games will be played in the United States.  Cincinnati is listed as a likely host.

If Cincinnati hosts, we will get either four or five games over a 2-week period.