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Offline buildingcincinnati

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Cincinnati Hospitals
« on: June 19, 2005, 11:21:18 AM »
The hospital building boom
By 2008, projects will total $700M

By Tim Bonfield
Enquirer staff writer

 
Good Samaritan and Bethesda North hospitals are building new, high-rise patient towers. Mercy Hospital Fairfield just opened a heart center, and St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Edgewood is expanding emergency rooms. In Middletown, a brand-new hospital will be going up soon.  Across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, hospitals are undergoing the biggest construction boom in years.

Ten major projects worth more than $700 million have recently opened or will be built by 2008. Eight are in the suburbs, adding intensive care, operating rooms, maternity suites, cardiac care, doctor's offices and state-of-the-art equipment to serve hundreds of thousands of patients for decades to come.  Construction costs alone are enough to build the $280 million Great American Ball Park 2˝ times.

Read full article here:
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050619/NEWS01/506190402/1056/rss02
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:41:38 PM by UncleRando »
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Offline buildingcincinnati

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2005, 08:26:24 PM »
Commissioners could cut chunk of levy for indigent
Proposal would chop $15M from University's funds

Jacob Dirr
Courier Contributor


University Hospital is developing a plan to prepare for a reduction or loss in the $34 million in public money it gets each year to care for the uninsured.  An independent Health Care Review Committee, convened by the Hamilton County Commissioners, is reviewing a proposal that would reduce the amount University receives each year to $19.2 million, a 43 percent cut.

"We are very concerned," said Lee Ann Liska, University Hospital vice president. "The levy only supports a portion of our total investment and therefore we would have to really look at how we deliver care."  The plan, which top managers are not ready to release to the public, includes options that could impact employees and services provided by the hospital, Liska said.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2005/12/19/story6.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:40:08 PM by UncleRando »
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Offline buildingcincinnati

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2006, 10:10:50 PM »
Hospitals put one foot in suburb, keep one in city
BY PEGGY O'FARRELL | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

Cincinnati's big three health-care providers - TriHealth, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Health Alliance - are investing hundreds of millions of dollars in new construction in Butler and Warren counties.  The expansion benefits everyone, hospital officials say. Consumers get high-quality health-care close to home, and hospitals get a customer base that keeps growing.

Even as they get ready to break ground in the suburbs, hospital officials say, they aren't abandoning Uptown, the area that's home to the city's hospitals. They're investing more to upgrade their home bases in and around Avondale with more patient beds and work space for doctors and researchers.  Hospital officials say their building boom lets them expand their patient base in the suburbs while providing care in Cincinnati's urban core.

Read full article here:
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060530/NEWS01/605300336/1056/rss02
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:38:59 PM by UncleRando »
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Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2006, 05:53:55 PM »
This kind of growth is great.....steady and it provides high paying jobs!  Not to mention they build towers!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2007, 08:55:15 PM »
A northern version of 'Pill Hill'?
By Jessica Brown, Cincinnati Enquirer | February 20, 2007

Within five years, health industry leaders predict that people living in Butler County will be able to get nearly every kind of medical care without driving south of Interstate 275.  “In five years, maybe you’ll have to go (to Cincinnati) for a transplant or a specialized service,” said John Gillespie, director of marketing and development for UC Physicians, which operates a $100 million medical campus in West Chester. “But aside from that, everything you’re going to need will be right here.”

By 2009, local health systems will have spent more than $500 million to build, relocate or expand hospitals and other medical services in Greater Cincinnati’s northern suburbs. Projects include the relocation of Middletown Regional Hospital, expansions at Mercy Hospital Fairfield, a medical campus for Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Liberty Township, and the $207 million West Chester Medical Center being built by the Health Alliance – the first truly new hospital built in Butler County in 30 years.

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http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070220/NEWS01/302200070
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:35:48 PM by UncleRando »

Offline glutmax

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2007, 09:37:21 PM »
Yeahhh, for Health Care Sprawl! :whip:
Born in Paine, livin the 'Wood. . .

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2007, 01:48:40 AM »
UC asks to join Alliance-Christ suit
May 23, 2007 | CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER

The University of Cincinnati is asking to become a party in the lawsuit between the Health Alliance and Christ Hospital.  If UC's motion, filed Wednesday, is granted, UC will be able to "participate fully in all negotiations and discussions regarding the litigation,"according to a UC press release.

"It must be remembered that all participating entities in the Health Alliance, including UC, have charitable missions," UC President Nancy Zimpher said in the release.  "UC's intention is to help facilitate an equitable transition for all Health Alliance hospitals, while preserving quality health care for our community. Our interest is in protecting the public interest and that necessitates an official place at the table," Zimpher added.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2007/05/21/daily36.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:33:48 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2007, 08:59:09 AM »
Hospitals will leave Alliance
Judge refuses to delay plans for Christ, St. Luke hospitals
By Cliff Peale, Cincinnati Enquirer | June 21, 2007

Christ Hospital can open a long-term acute care unit and recruit more doctors.  St. Luke Hospitals can proceed to negotiate a merger with St. Elizabeth Medical Center.  And both hospitals can tap the millions of dollars in revenue they produce and start to operate as independent hospitals as they negotiate their withdrawal from the Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati.

Those are the main results after a Hamilton County Common Pleas judge Wednesday rejected an attempt to delay his order that the hospitals could withdraw from the region's largest health system.  Judge Fred Nelson denied the Alliance's request to stay his order while it appeals the ruling. He offered to stay the portion ordering the Alliance to pay Christ and St. Luke attorneys' fees if it posted a $4.8 million bond - the amount of the attorneys' fees plus interest. The Alliance did not indicate whether it would do so.

Read full article here:
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070621/BIZ01/706210363/1076
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:32:13 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2007, 05:39:57 PM »
This is getting really nasty...I wonder what the source of all this animosity is?

Christ wants Alliance to fold, oust CEO
By James Ritchie, Cincinnati Business Courier | July 19, 2007

Christ Hospital's board is calling for a complete dissolution of the Health Alliance and, in the meantime, the ouster of the hospital group's CEO.  The board accuses CEO Ken Hanover of delay tactics and unnecessary legal wrangling following a judge's April ruling that Christ and the two St. Luke hospitals could withdraw from the Health Alliance. The Health Alliance released a statement in which the system's board chairwoman, Gloria Haffer, was quoted defending Hanover.

"No meaningful progress has been made over the past three months, as the alliance leadership seems to prefer to litigate rather than negotiate," according to a July 19 letter from Christ board Chairman Michael Keating to the Health Alliance board and Hanover.  Christ seeks to invoke a provision in the health system's joint operating agreement that states that if two or more members seek to get out, the remainder of the alliance is to "promptly take all action necessary to dissolve and wind up" its affairs.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2007/07/16/daily54.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:29:55 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2007, 08:35:45 AM »
Drake could become military rehabilitation center
By James Ritchie, Cincinnati Business Courier | October 5, 2007

The Drake Center is vying to become one of the rehabilitative hospitals for soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan.  Drake's top executive, Karen Bankston, met with top military leaders in Washington, D.C., about the possibility, which could bolster both the hospital's revenue and its reputation. She's hoping for word in early 2008.

Physical and staffing constraints mean the military's rehabilitation programs at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, the National Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md., and Brooke Army Medical Center in Texas are stretched thin, Bankston said.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2007/10/08/story9.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 11:24:34 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2007, 04:51:58 PM »
Tower doubles research efforts
Budget, facilities attract top-drawer scientists
By Cliff Peale, Cincinnati Enquirer | November 18, 2007

After several years of continuous construction, big new buildings at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have become rather commonplace.  But not this one.  When this $136 million research tower opens Monday, it will be the largest capital expenditure in the hospital's history. The tower will help Children's put itself on track to double the size of a research program that already attracts hundreds of millions of dollars in funding and researchers from around the world.

And it comes as federal money for research nationally has stagnated.  "It's huge," said Arnold Strauss, director of the Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation and chairman of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati. "We're opening new research space at a time when most places are having to scale back."  In the last five years, the research unit has increased its total program awards by nearly half to $123.4 million, mostly from the National Institutes of Health.

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http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071118/NEWS01/711180368
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:29:43 PM by UncleRando »

Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2008, 01:08:36 PM »
Christ Hospital leaves alliance
Departure from Health Alliance will cost millions, at first
BY CLIFF PEALE | CPEALE@ENQUIRER.COM

Christ Hospital will become independent this year, but it will spend tens of millions of dollars on the transition and on renovations.  Starting next month, Christ will start paying its own employees. In April, it will start billing for its services and in May it will unveil a new patient-information system.  The changes are part of Christ Hospital's acrimonious withdrawal from the Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati.

After 14 years as one of six hospitals in the region's largest health-care system, the withdrawal of Christ and the St. Luke Hospitals in Northern Kentucky sparked a two-year legal battle that still lingers.  Both hospitals said the alliance neglected them and didn't invest enough in their facilities.

Read full article here:
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080221/BIZ01/802210326/1076/BIZ
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:28:33 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2008, 03:01:41 PM »
This seems like a good move for Christ...and will allow for the Health Alliance to pursue their own goals without conflicting with Christ's aspirations.

Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2008, 04:01:38 PM »
Quote
To Christ Hospital and the St. Luke hospitals, which are leaving the Health Alliance after a long legal battle, the hospital represents the crux of what's wrong with the system: too much focus on growth in the suburbs, too little on maintaining existing facilities. The system - which includes University, Jewish and Fort Hamilton hospitals, along with the Drake Center rehabilitation hospital - and its departing members have clashed over how the $220 million hospital should be paid for and who should bear the costs.

Sound familiar - this is getting old.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2008, 03:34:43 PM »
Web site allows Cincinnati hospital comparisons
February 27, 2008 | CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER

A new Web site allows users to find out how individual Greater Cincinnati hospitals compare on performance measures related to heart attack, congestive heart failure and pneumonia.  The data collection effort is part of the Hospital Quality Improvement Project, an initiative of the Greater Cincinnati Health Council and the Ohio Hospital Association. The site is www.gchchospitalquality.org.

"The Web site demonstrates the commitment area hospitals have to public transparency and accountability," Colleen O'Toole, president of the Health Council president said in a news release. "For hospitals, the goal is that they use the information on their performance to improve patient outcomes, and we are indeed showing positive results. These trends mean lives are being saved."

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2008/02/25/daily40.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:23:14 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2008, 10:07:03 AM »
UC could be local health care hub
EDITORIAL | CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER
March 28, 2008


Unless you're a child or a stroke patient, the first place you go if you get sick in Greater Cincinnati is the airport - to get on an airplane to fly to a more renowned hospital.  Those aren't our words, but they are the provocative words of David Stern, the head of health affairs for the University of Cincinnati, which holds a distinct advantage and responsibility in stabilizing Cincinnati's splintering health care marketplace.

Stern, dean of the UC medical school since 2005, took on larger responsibilities for UC President Nancy Zimpher as of Jan. 1 in trying to put UC at the center of a rebuilt Cincinnati health care delivery system.  As he builds a case for developing UC as a national leader in four areas - cancer care, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease and treatment of diabetes and obesity - he uses the airport argument to make a point about Cincinnati health care.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2008/03/31/editorial1.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:22:25 PM by UncleRando »

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2008, 08:34:53 AM »
My sister is a nurse and all of her co-workers have moved here from rural Ohio towns (many from the northern part of the state).   Alot of them are in that 24-30 year old range

Cincinnati health care jobs get tougher to fill

Overall vacancy rates in 32 "hard-to-fill" health care positions increased to 6.3 percent in 2008 from 5.2 percent last year, according to the Greater Cincinnati Health Council.  The vacancy rate for registered nurses increased to 7.3 percent from 5.7 percent, the health council reports in its 2008 vacancy report, which contains 2008 vacancy data from area hospitals.

But the region has been successful in recruiting new people to the nursing, said Mary Duffey, executive director of the council's Health Care Workforce Center.  Approximately 73.8 percent of nurses employed in area hospitals are under age 50. Nearly half are under 40.

Read full article here:
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2008/04/28/daily45.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:20:57 PM by UncleRando »
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Offline arenn

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2008, 01:20:36 PM »
How many sick kids are there in Cincinnati?

I just spent some time there last week and was amazed at how many different facilities Children's Hospital has.  I think I must have seen four or five scattered around.


Offline dmerkow

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2008, 04:03:47 PM »
They serve an international audience and have been great about getting gov't money. My sense (I could be wrong) is that the strength of Children's has generally meant that the other hospitals in the area simply don't even try to compete thus giving them a monopoly of sorts.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2008, 06:40:43 PM »
Yup...Cincinnati Children's Hospital draws from a national and international audience.

Offline the pope

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2008, 10:21:14 PM »
Yes, Children's hospitals (good ones that is) serve a few purposes:

1) Magnet Hospital for Metro (and generally little competition)
2) Easier Name Recognition. Take for example University Hospitals of Cleveland. Its a top tier hospital, generally in the top quartile of whatever ranking you can find. Unfortunately it always will be in the Cleveland Clinic's shadow. But it has Rainbow Babies Hospital and that facility is always top 5 in the nation/midwest/whatever (don't quote me on that)
3) Money. Children's hospitals are magnets for big donor money. Conversely burn centers are not. Typically when it comes to being a Level I trauma center, a burn center is a sticking point for many. Not many hospitals want the investment of being Level I, since it hardly pays off (again, donors).

Someone please correct me if I'm out in left field.

Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2008, 09:47:24 AM »
Mercy plans new hospital
Western Hills, Mount Airy affected

BY CLIFF PEALE | CPEALE@ENQUIRER.COM

Mercy Health Partners is planning a new hospital on the west side of Hamilton County that would replace two of its oldest hospitals, Mercy Western Hills and Mercy Mount Airy.  The hospital operator, a unit of downtown-based Catholic Healthcare Partners, said Saturday that its board has endorsed the idea. It has not identified a site but has been scouting potential locations.

In a statement, Mercy said the hospital would take three years to build. The final plan still must be approved by the boards of Mercy and CHP.  The hospitals along Queen City Avenue in Westwood and on Kipling Avenue in Mount Airy were built more than 30 years ago, making them among the oldest in Mercy's Greater Cincinnati system. Each employs about 850 workers. Combined, they have about 400 beds.

Read full article here:
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080608/BIZ01/806080341/1076/BIZ
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:19:17 PM by UncleRando »

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #22 on: June 10, 2008, 12:19:57 AM »
The Mercy West hospital, in Western Hills, seems to be in good condition.  They have also done renovations and expansions somewhat recently.  There also seems to be more room to grow at that location.  I'm guessing they want to move their operations closer to where the new growth is on the westside (i.e. northern Green Twp).

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2008, 02:36:00 PM »
Mercy weighs new sites
Westwood, Mt. Airy hospitals' fates unknown

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080622/NEWS01/806220353/1077/COL02
...there's a reason that Elm Street and Main Street resonate in our cultural memory. It's not because we're sentimental saps. It's because this pattern of human ecology produced places that worked wonderfully well, and which people deeply loved. - Jim Kunstler

Offline AndrewN

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2008, 03:26:34 PM »
I am going to forecast that the new Mercy Western Hills site will end up somewhere near the I-74 Harrison/Rybolt interchange.  It makes sense given all the continued building that is occuring in the area.

Offline TraderJake

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2008, 06:56:15 PM »
My marbles are on right behind Bob Evans on North Bend Rd. It's supposed to be a a health care facility of some sort, why can't it be a new hospital?
Think Multimodally. Cars are only part of the equation.

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2008, 11:36:13 AM »
Health Alliance could buy Cincinnati's Jewish Hospital, shuffle power
http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2008/07/07/story2.html

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #27 on: July 06, 2008, 11:11:38 PM »

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #28 on: July 06, 2008, 11:50:20 PM »
^Yeah, that article was f                  ing ridiculous. 

Nationally, the trend is driven by healthy cash flow from suburban hospitals, heavy population growth in surrounding neighborhoods and the search for new revenues that aren't constricted by insurance payments.

"It's an opportunity for the hospitals to surround themselves with a lot of amenities and it certainly helps them control their environment," said Gary Scanlon, vice president at Miller-Valentine specializing in health-care properties.



Yeah, well that whole "control their environment" statement is a blatantly racist, anti-city one.  Recently I heard someone comment that the new suburban hospitals are being built because "people in the suburbs pay their bills".  And amenities is the name of the game...I recently visited someone in Good Sam and the whole place looked like a damn trendy hotel on the inside, and people wonder why their medical bills are so high.  Give me cinder blocks or give me death.     

Offline oakiehigh

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #29 on: July 16, 2008, 07:07:14 AM »
...there's a reason that Elm Street and Main Street resonate in our cultural memory. It's not because we're sentimental saps. It's because this pattern of human ecology produced places that worked wonderfully well, and which people deeply loved. - Jim Kunstler

Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2008, 09:47:12 AM »
New Cincinnati Children's site based on area's need
Number of patients was key factor in decision to build campus at corner of I-75 and Ohio 129.


http://www.journal-news.com/n/content/oh/story/news/local/2008/07/16/hjn071708decision.html

Offline UncleRando

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #31 on: July 23, 2008, 09:03:26 AM »

Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2008, 10:29:08 AM »
Hospital brings 550 full-time jobs to West Chester Twp.
By Dave Greber, Staff Writer
Sunday, November 02, 2008

As the West Chester Medical Center enters its final months of construction, officials are hurriedly scouring the area to fill the facility with quality doctors, nurses and support staff.  The $225 million full-service hospital is due to open in May, and construction crews are less than a month away completing all exterior work, which turns the focus inside.

"If you look at it, it looks ready to open," said Stephanie Savicki, the hospital's public relations and marketing manager.  Still, workers this week were seen putting the finishing touches on the building's entrance, doors and surrounding areas, and planting bushes and trees in nearby landscaping beds.  Inside, the activity continued on flooring, walls and ceilings. Up next is the installation of the building's complex information technology systems and medical equipment.

Read full article here:
http://www.journal-news.com/n/content/oh/story/news/local/2008/11/02/HJN110308medupdate.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 10:17:58 PM by UncleRando »

Offline PhattyNati

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2008, 10:46:35 AM »
So is this kind of growth merely a redistribution of jobs, or will the majority of these positions actually be new hires.  It seems to me that maybe there is a little of both.
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Offline Mr. Anderson

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Re: Cincinnati Hospitals
« Reply #34 on: November 03, 2008, 11:56:43 AM »
So is this kind of growth merely a redistribution of jobs, or will the majority of these positions actually be new hires.  It seems to me that maybe there is a little of both.

The West Chester Medical Center is part of what's left of the "Health Alliance".  I'd say most of these jobs are new because I haven't heard about them closing any units down in Cincinnati.