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Mass Transit / Re: Cleveland transit- ideas for the future
« Last post by nycmets2 on Today at 04:45:35 AM »
For the Red Line Rapid+ to Lorain, the designs for the stations shouldn't exceeded $50k-200k since it will only be high platform with basic shelter with stairs and a ramp for ADA. RTA spend useless amount of money overbuilding thier stations. Music Star Commuter rail was build for only $45m. That's sad that auto centric Nashville have a commuter rail before us
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After the apparent success of the Republican National Convention there, I'd say Cleveland has a pretty sizable amount of political capital to go big on a funding request to the Feds on a cap for the Shoreway, if not more besides. The time is ripe for them to be even more aggressive on projects that really build on all that they were able to showcase of the city that enabled them to draw and host the RNC.

Pittsburgh's I-579 cap looks like it's going to be nice, something that really contributes to the overall aesthetic of their downtown as the core of the city, making it an even more attractive place to visit and spend time in. Nice to see another Rust Belt city on the comeback trail.
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Mass Transit / Re: Cleveland transit- ideas for the future
« Last post by nycmets2 on Today at 04:35:28 AM »
Whatever happen to NEORail? Well since no public agency will make the necessary steps to expand rail in this region, why don't we the people fundraise and do it ourselves as a non profit organization. First line is too lease the old Nickle Plate Road to Lorain. Then buy the old stainless steel Red Line cars for cheap, send them to Brookeville Rail equipment and manufacturing company in Pennsylvania for1-1.5 for total rebuild as well DMU power. All stations will be Lorain, Avon West, Avon East, Crocker Park, Columbia Rd, Rocker River, Lakewood West, Lakewood East, W Blvd. Tower City. We should demand RTA to build a Red Line station over the Flats near the Warf after the trestle bridge. Next is to reform bus routes more like a grid instead of sending all buses to downtown Cleveland.Some buses that don't go downtown should be routed to the Rapids as a feeder route Bus stops should be more space out. 5/6 blocks in length. Most of the Rapid Park  in Ride perking spots should be develop to TOD with enough parking for transit users. W. Park should be moved closer to Lorain Ave. Parking should be closer too. Security. Red Line should return to turnstiles' with transit cop at each Red Line station and CCTV. If someone jumps, you can send a cop to the train on the next station this goes as well on the Health Line. All rapid equipment should have low/ high  platform boarding like Muni or Septa Silverliner V  The biggest one of them all is the Downtown subway/ Busway( Seattle). Phase 1 will be Huron and superior trunk subways E 13st. Cut n Cover construction. Red Line from the west turns towards Superior after getting off the viaduct Stops at W 3 , W 9 buses, E9, E12. Red Line from the East goes through Huron E 9, Euclid Playhouse Sq. Buses coming west would use the bridge subway and bus from  East heads down a bus ramp at E18. Phase 2 is to connect the tunnels through E13. You will have the Chinese or Spaniards built the tunnel because they are able to build on the cheap. RTA should buy up the parking lots in Downtown and use it as venture capture to fund it's regional system and pay for these expansion and including a increase of 50% in parking fares in location.
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In my opinion, historic preservation only really matters when you can save a whole street or whole district worth of buildings. Of course there are exceptions where a single, historically significant building should be saved. But in general, what we want to save is the historic feeling of the neighborhood.

In a neighborhood like Corryville where entire blocks are being demolished for low quality student housing, why even bother to fight that fight? Uptown Properties has the time and money to fight the historic preservationists, and even if we win, we might save 1 block of buildings in a neighborhood that's full of junk like VP3. It makes much more sense to focus our effort on areas where we can actually have an impact and start to send a message to developers: "You can not demolish an historic building in OTR. Period."

Very true.

 I also think that at the end of the day that many young cincinnatians are finally realizing how important OTR is to our culture of Cincinnati. OTR isn't just a neighborhood, but rather a vital lifeline to our past. It's history is profound, and the buildings become more than just old and antiquated buildings, but rather a key connection to our past and history.

 Other neighborhoods struggle establishing that identity that OTR has been able to establish recently with our millienials. I really think it's because it's not just about the architecture, but it's also about being able to live in a neighborhood that has so much history and meaning that OTR has to Cincinnati.

I think at the end of the day, I'll trade a 100% fully rehabbed OTR/Pendelton/Old West End/Mohawk/Brighton district, and be perfectly fine with losing everything else. There's nothing like OTR in cincinnati. No other neighborhood compares to it's beauty, and it's street layout, and it's history. Oh and the views! Certain houses on mulberry street over look above all of OTR, and downtown cincinnati. It's so damn priceless, and on a crisp sunrise there's nothing more beautiful to witness the sunrise against the historic brick row houses and church steeples.

  No other neighborhood holds the sheer magnitude of potential that OTR holds. OTR is a neighborhood time capsule that is rare to find nowadays in the midwest, and is continually disappearing in other major cities, and I promise you that it will become a premier attraction for our city when everything is built out and gentrified.

 I've grown to become a preservationist through my discovery and love for OTR. But I'll admit, my love for Cincinnati is really only because of  my discovery of OTR. It's that special of a neighborhood for me, and I'm literally obsessed with the potential it holds (in terms of rehabilitation and infill and just continued gentrification northwards).

 But it still saddens me regardless to see continue destruction of other neighborhoods, especially when it's for surface lots or ugly infill.
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If you're thinking there might be a decoration of some kind on that blank wall, nothing was submitted to planning commission.
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Current Events / Re: 2016 Presidential Election Discussion
« Last post by KJP on Today at 02:50:17 AM »
The Houston Chronicle endorsed Romney in 2012. In 2016, they made a surprising endorsement...

http://m.chron.com/opinion/recommendations/article/For-Hillary-Clinton-8650345.php

Any one of Trump’s less-than-sterling qualities — his erratic temperament, his dodgy business practices, his racism, his Putin-like strongman inclinations and faux-populist demagoguery, his contempt for the rule of law, his ignorance — is enough to be disqualifying. His convention-speech comment, “I alone can fix it,” should make every American shudder. He is, we believe, a danger to the Republic.
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Completed Projects / Re: Cleveland: Public Square Redesign
« Last post by dave68 on Today at 12:04:40 AM »
If Public Square goes the route of no bus access, what/how would one like to see Public Square adjust?
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Completed Projects / Re: Cleveland: Public Square Redesign
« Last post by mrclifton88 on Yesterday at 11:59:55 PM »
I have to say I was pleasantly surprised with Public Square holding the event, it is more spacious that I thought it would be. BUT. I agree with you still, the mall in my opinion was absolutely perfect for this event.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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In my opinion, historic preservation only really matters when you can save a whole street or whole district worth of buildings. Of course there are exceptions where a single, historically significant building should be saved. But in general, what we want to save is the historic feeling of the neighborhood.

In a neighborhood like Corryville where entire blocks are being demolished for low quality student housing, why even bother to fight that fight? Uptown Properties has the time and money to fight the historic preservationists, and even if we win, we might save 1 block of buildings in a neighborhood that's full of junk like VP3. It makes much more sense to focus our effort on areas where we can actually have an impact and start to send a message to developers: "You can not demolish an historic building in OTR. Period."
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Urbanbar / Re: Career Networking Thread
« Last post by GCrites80s on Yesterday at 10:54:13 PM »
Double. Stupid phone.
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