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Urbanbar / Re: Hipsters
« Last post by jmecklenborg on Today at 12:05:21 AM »
Just realized that this video turns 20 this year...right now in 2014 the way the guys in the band are dressed is how I see everyone who is college-aged looking now.  And Liz's look has been the standard "cool indie rock chick" look for at least 20 years. 


I was about 15 when this video aired, and the consensus was that Liz Phair looked like pretty much the coolest girlfriend to be had.  Now, she looks like after slashing your tires and calling your workplace with some made-up nonsense she'd go pounce on one of your best friends. 
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Some progress since those last photos
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City Life / Re: Condo Ownership
« Last post by jmecklenborg on Yesterday at 11:05:42 PM »
I had a discussion with a coworker about home ownership.  We discussed doing a 15 yr loan vs 30 yr.  He is a very successful guy who makes a lot & could probably pay cash for his home but has a 30 yr loan so he can invest the majority of his money rather than pay down the debt.  Higher return on his money that way he says.   

Yes that's certainly possible in theory but you do invite an element of risk. The house of cards collapsed for many people in the fall of 2008, with many people with 30-years underwater.  Something truly extreme has to happen to drop underwater on a 15.  2008 was pretty damn extreme, and no doubt many people with 15's foreclosed, but that would have been because they lost one or two incomes. 
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Hampton Inn construction today. Sad how suburban this place looks.
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City Life / Re: Condo Ownership
« Last post by jmecklenborg on Yesterday at 11:02:28 PM »
Housing isn't sold in shares, except for (I'm joking) time-shares.  But you make a good point -- when the housing market sinks, you can't rush in and buy more shares like you can with stocks, ETF's, etc. 

Now investors can and did do that back circa 2009...anyone with cash and some balls was feasting upon cheap homes and undervalued rental property.  But honestly who were those people?  Either the super-wealthy or those who happened to inherit a ton of cash in 2008-2011.  The little house across the street from me was purchased for $50K in 2009 and now that son-of-a-bitch has it parked on the market for $89,000 and he's not budging.  It's definitely not worth $89k -- he's waiting for some sucker to come along and fall in love with it and overpay in a swell of "house fever". 






 
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City Life / Re: Condo Ownership
« Last post by gottaplan on Yesterday at 11:01:08 PM »
I had a discussion with a coworker about home ownership.  We discussed doing a 15 yr loan vs 30 yr.  He is a very successful guy who makes a lot & could probably pay cash for his home but has a 30 yr loan so he can invest the majority of his money rather than pay down the debt.  Higher return on his money that way he says.   
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Sports Talk / Re: Columbus Blue Jackets Discussion
« Last post by Gramarye on Yesterday at 10:39:56 PM »
Damn these are frustrating losses!

Damn these are exhilarating wins!

But I hear the Ross Heart Hospital at OSU is still doing an abnormally large volume of business tonight ...
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City Life / Re: Condo Ownership
« Last post by Gramarye on Yesterday at 10:34:00 PM »
The appreciation element is slightly more complex than that article explains, though the truth is somewhat more complex and therefore maybe not as WaPo-friendly.

The 0.3% real returns is a good number to keep in mind, but remember that almost everyone buys real estate highly leveraged.  If you paid 20% down, that 0.3% return is 1.5% on equity, at least to start.  If you put 10% down, it's 3% to start.  However, as you begin to pay down the principal, you become less leveraged and your gains on capital begin to track the actual 0.3% statistic more and more each year.  More importantly, however, remember that the 0.3% stat is just an average.  There are some people who will not fare so well, and leverage turbocharges losses as well.  That's the real reason I'm very nervous as a homeowner.  With 20% down, a 20% drop in the sale price wipes out 100% of my capital; a 10% drop still wipes out 50%.  And, of course, it is inherently non-diversified (the amount of my down payment was considerably more than double my holdings in my largest stock holding).  If I see the value of some stocks in my 401(k) (I self-direct a solid portion of mine outside my firm's cafeteria plan) and IRA decline by 20% or more, I certainly don't lose sleep and I sometimes feel my ears perking up--the market may have just declared a sale on a company I'd be happy to own a little more of.  If I saw home prices in my neighborhood decline by 20% or more, I'd feel myself growing older on the spot.
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City Discussion / Re: Cleveland: The City in Movies & TV
« Last post by freethink on Yesterday at 10:01:36 PM »

John Travolta headed to Cleveland this spring to shoot new movie: 'Criminal Activities


"For me, having a film commissioner that understands the needs and challenges of the independent film maker is the number one factor in choosing the city to film in," said producer Wayne Rice.
"The Ohio Incentive Program is a great opportunity for our Industry, coupled with a fantastic Cleveland Film Commission that understands our business and what we need to succeed; coupled with great locations and hard working crews make the Ohio Program tough to beat," said producer Mark Johnson.

http://www.cleveland.com/moviebuff/index.ssf/2014/04/john_travolta_headed_to_clevel.html
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