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Ohio Politics / Re: Ohio Gubernatorial Election 2014
« Last post by Gramarye on Today at 04:31:40 PM »
I know Kansas had some major players in the abolitionist movement.  What other liberal populism ideas were you thinking of?

William Jennings Bryan had a massive following in Kansas--agricultural populism against the Gilded Age Republican financial elite.
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Ohio Politics / Re: Ohio Gubernatorial Election 2014
« Last post by Hts121 on Today at 04:10:45 PM »
I wasn't even necessarily attacking the argument; my problem was with your characterization of Rolling Stone itself, so in this case, it really was about the source--because you, too, were saying something directly about the source.

I only said anything in response to the implication that the source was waging a "War" on the Tea Party.


In terms of Brownback's actual record in Kansas, there's a lot going on in Kansas and its status as a deep-red state is actually somewhat recent and may have been somewhat overblown; it certainly has a powerful populist streak (even though its most infamous residents are the Koch brothers), but both conservative and liberal populism have both found receptive ears there in the past.  Kansas may well be a warning about conservative policies--but if you believe that a state's economic fortunes really are so tied to its political management, then Rhode Island is an even starker warning about liberal policies, as is Michigan (even though the current governor is Republican, the state is still basically blue).

I don't think it is a warning about 'conservative policies'...... I think it is a warning about extremist Tea Party policies, sans the effects of global changes which particularly impacted a state like Michigan.  There is a big difference in my mind between conservative policies and Tea Party policies.  The former, in theory, would never follow an extremist approach and make dramatic shifts in policy in such a short time.

I know Kansas had some major players in the abolitionist movement.  What other liberal populism ideas were you thinking of?
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Railways & Waterways / Re: Cincinnati-Indy-Chicago passenger rail
« Last post by wmwoodward on Today at 04:09:11 PM »
I've not really been keeping up with what's going on with this, but this article popped up on my reddit feed today.

Plans for train connecting Columbus and Chicago chug forward
http://thelantern.com/2014/10/plans-for-train-connecting-columbus-and-chicago-chug-forward/

Ahem.....
http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,20921.0.html

Ah sorry! It was late here only browsed to see if I could find mention of it and skipped the first page completely since it was dated so long ago. But I now notice another article that I missed mentioning the route to Columbus on page 2. I guess posting the reddit thread may have been more interesting because hearing Chicago redditors complain about visiting Ohio was fun.
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Mass Transit / Re: Cincinnati Streetcar News
« Last post by ryanlammi on Today at 04:04:22 PM »
The key line at the end:

"The city can still charge for a residential permit fee but the proceeds can only cover the costs of the program, [former Cincinnati city solicitor John] Curp said."

Of course, this is his legal opinion. So it could be argued in court if someone sues the city if the city goes forward.
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Also worth pointing out that the odd orientation of the courts vis-a-vis Chester is necessitated by the geography of that block, so that weird triangular lawn is not intentional.

I understand jeremy's point though. It's always nice to take advantage of opportunities to liven up our sidewalks by making activity on adjacent lots visible, especially in parts of downtown that can feel pretty empty.  There just wasn't such an opportunity in this case.
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Ohio Politics / Re: Ohio Gubernatorial Election 2014
« Last post by Gramarye on Today at 03:53:37 PM »
I wasn't even necessarily attacking the argument; my problem was with your characterization of Rolling Stone itself, so in this case, it really was about the source--because you, too, were saying something directly about the source.

In terms of Brownback's actual record in Kansas, there's a lot going on in Kansas and its status as a deep-red state is actually somewhat recent and may have been somewhat overblown; it certainly has a powerful populist streak (even though its most infamous residents are the Koch brothers), but both conservative and liberal populism have both found receptive ears there in the past.  Kansas may well be a warning about conservative policies--but if you believe that a state's economic fortunes really are so tied to its political management, then Rhode Island is an even starker warning about liberal policies, as is Michigan (even though the current governor is Republican, the state is still basically blue).
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Mass Transit / Re: Cincinnati Streetcar News
« Last post by OllyTransit on Today at 03:53:00 PM »
Welp. Kiss that parking permit goodbye? It got a pretty lukewarm reception from council as well.

​EXCLUSIVE: $300-a-year parking permits for Over-the-Rhine might be illegal

A 2012 Ohio Supreme Court case may bar the city of Cincinnati from imposing a $300-a-year residential parking permit fee on Over-the-Rhine residents and using the proceeds to pay to operate the streetcar.

The case, Drees v. Hamilton Township, centers on the Warren County community's attempts to impose impact fees on developers building new residential or commercial property.

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/10/23/exclusive-300-a-year-parking-permits-for-over-the.html?ana=twt
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Mass Transit / Re: Light Rail / Streetcar News Outside of Ohio
« Last post by natininja on Today at 03:49:23 PM »
LOL I was positive you were joking! I couldn't even read the headline without hearing the song in my head.

What can I say, I need to listen to more Queen!
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Mass Transit / Re: Light Rail / Streetcar News Outside of Ohio
« Last post by natininja on Today at 03:48:45 PM »
I found this article about the plan for DC's streetcar system to be pretty interesting.  Increasingly, it seems like the lack of a dedicated lane for streetcars has been called out as a real transit issue.  Part of me wonders if this generation's streetcar obsession will be viewed in the same vein as the push to add monorails in places like Seattle and Detroit.  I also found the ambitious DC streetcar plan to be striking, given the already extensive subway system that exists in the city.  Getting around in DC is already really easy, I think.  Between the Metro and the efficient bus system, coupled with the fact that DC is a very walkable city, I don't see a huge transit need that isn't being met.  Whereas San Francisco has a huge streetcar/cable car/MUNI system, they also have extremely limited heavy rail service.  Together, the systems work in concert to provide a good level of coverage for most of the city.  Cincinnati is launching a streetcar system, with the hope that additional streetcar lines will be built, or that a light rail system will be constructed.  I get the case for streetcars in these settings.  In DC, I guess it's just a little harder to see the need.  Will be interesting to hear the thoughts of other forumers.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/key-questions-still-surround-planned-opening-of-dc-streetcar-line/2014/10/22/ed4d23f8-4f19-11e4-8c24-487e92bc997b_story.html

I think you're pretty spot-on. Whether streetcars are the right transit tool depends on the context. DC's streetcar is probably the most suspect of the modern crop. In a transit-poor city with a densely built, somewhat downtrodden downtown like Cincinnati's, they are a fantastic idea. Most of the critics are unfamiliar and/or unrealistic about the political climates in tier-3 urban America, as well as the urban economic and real estate contexts in those cities.

Contexts are likely to shift, too, though -- in fact that's largely the point of streetcar projects. So cities building them should keep an eye to how to keep the infrastructure relevant in the long term. For example, designing lines with the possibility in mind of making the ROW exclusive and carrying longer, heavier vehicles in the future. (One example where I think Cincinnati's streetcar maybe missed this mark is in not planning for one-way to two-way street conversions.)
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^I actually thought that was the North Residential Village at first.  Also, at one point CSU's master plan called for dormitories much like this surrounding a baseball field.  Anyone know if this is still part of the planning, maybe a phase 2 of the Langston?
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