Author Topic: Governor John Kasich  (Read 107350 times)

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Offline natininja

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1330 on: January 25, 2013, 03:00:52 PM »
^Are you kidding? aOSU is terrified by the idea of UC threatening their dominance.
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Offline Gramarye

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1331 on: January 25, 2013, 03:15:44 PM »
tOSU is terrified by the idea of UC threatening their dominance not bringing another major media market to the Big Ten network, which is the only reason middleweight teams are allowed in.

FTFY.

Offline natininja

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1332 on: January 25, 2013, 03:18:00 PM »
Even with UC outside the Big 10, OSU is terrified of UC.
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Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1333 on: January 25, 2013, 03:28:27 PM »
In what sports?

Offline KyleCincy

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1334 on: January 25, 2013, 03:28:57 PM »
But UC is dam near an AAU school, and a top 25 Public research school and the BIG label for UC would only bring in more $$$ to
Ohio, that has to trump all. I don't think OSU is scared or concerned like maybe 15 years ago. Gee chairs the task force on statewide university funding.

Anyway word on the street is that the Big 12 has been told they need to go to at least 12, or add 2 more schools for a CCG.
Do they raid 2 ACC schools, or grab UC, does UC end up in the ACC?

Offline KyleCincy

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1335 on: January 25, 2013, 03:31:14 PM »
In what sports?

OSU will always recruit well, doesn't matter where UC is, and they have a locked in fan base. UCs base would grow a little.
I mean jeez, Indiana has IU, Purdue and ND. UC and OSU can coexist in the same conference, it benefits Ohio.

Offline natininja

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1336 on: January 25, 2013, 03:55:50 PM »
In what sports?

The money-maker: football.

OSU changes their schedule to avoid playing UC. A UC-OSU annual match-up would be a huge money-maker. It would be a reality if OSU weren't afraid of losing.
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Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1337 on: January 25, 2013, 04:50:58 PM »
I don't think that's the reason. From 1950 on OSU would have beat UC 9 times out of 10.

Offline KyleCincy

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1338 on: January 25, 2013, 05:36:51 PM »
I don't think that's the reason. From 1950 on OSU would have beat UC 9 times out of 10.

As they probably would against most of the current Big Ten schools. Would be nice to see OSU play in Cincinnati every other year though.
OSU was supposed to come back to Cincy but they bought out of that game and moved to CBus, as allowed per the contract.
UC football and BBall has probably accomplished more with less than any other D1 program. Even OSU fans would probably agree to that.

I just want UC to end up at the big boy table, ACC or Big 12 would be fine.

Offline surfohio

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1339 on: February 05, 2013, 08:59:36 AM »
Ed Fitzgerald was interviewed by Bill Wills on WTAM this morning. Fitzgerald said Kasich has been a lousy governor and that he could do a better job. Wills pressed him a bit on running against Kasich, but Fitzgerald seems legitimately undecided at this point. He thinks he'll need about $20 million to run a viable campaign, saying that was a daunting proposition. Wills, a conservative, was very complimentary and supportive of Fitzgerald. However, Wills wished Fitzgerald would serve out another term at the County, and Fitzgerald admitted he'd be glad to do just that.

Offline Boreas

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1340 on: February 06, 2013, 09:44:03 AM »
Kasich's new "education plan" is a sop for his cronies in the charter school business.  Parents who can already afford to send their children to private schools will get our tax money to send their children to private school.  It will be about a billion dollars of state revenues that will go to these corporations.
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Offline Sherman Cahal

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1341 on: February 06, 2013, 09:56:38 AM »
IN-DEPTH: Kasich's budget gives county coffers a bum

Gov. John Kasich’s tax plan would result in a three-year windfall for counties thanks to expanding the sales tax to services, but the state would take over counties’ rates to prevent too big a boon.

Under the plan – which requires approval by the Legislature – counties are guaranteed increased revenue for three years starting with fiscal 2014, which begins July 1. They’ll get at least a 10 percent bump in revenue in the first 19 months under the new plan, compared with collections over the next few months. Over the rest of the three-year period, the state promises counties at least a 15 percent bump in revenue.

--

Hamilton County: Deficits, now projected to be $30 million in several years, would be reduced for its two stadiums. Under Kasich's plan, $6.5 million a year would be added to the fund.

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1342 on: February 06, 2013, 11:12:12 AM »
Kasich's new "education plan" is a sop for his cronies in the charter school business.  Parents who can already afford to send their children to private schools will get our tax money to send their children to private school.  It will be about a billion dollars of state revenues that will go to these corporations.

Seriously?  Of the Facebook friends I have in the education sector (only one of which works for a for-profit charter), all of them looked genuinely relieved when the budget proposal came out.  NPR has a decent rundown of the changes; the budget obviously supports vouchers more than you're comfortable with because you wouldn't be comfortable with anything short of completely eliminating them, and tries to give districts more labor flexibility, which I'm sure you also oppose.  That said, I really don't see any dramatic changes to the status quo here:

http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/2013/02/04/whats-gov-kasichs-2013-budget-does-for-education/

Offline Hts121

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1343 on: February 06, 2013, 11:50:55 AM »
Kasich undoubtedly 'moved toward the middle' with this budget proposal. 
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Offline natininja

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1344 on: February 06, 2013, 12:41:17 PM »
IN-DEPTH: Kasich's budget gives county coffers a bum

Gov. John Kasich’s tax plan would result in a three-year windfall for counties thanks to expanding the sales tax to services, but the state would take over counties’ rates to prevent too big a boon.

Totally ridiculous. Kasich pulls local funding, leaving smaller gov't entities to figure out how to fund services. Then he takes over one of the counties' main ways of controlling their revenue stream. The first is somewhat defensible under the idea of promoting local control, but when you combine that with reducing ways of raising revenue (having to ask permission of the state!) it becomes rather tyrannical.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 12:42:32 PM by natininja »
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Offline Keith

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1345 on: February 06, 2013, 12:55:35 PM »
I'm skeptical of Kasich, but so far his tax change proposals don't sound too bad. Lower income taxes and sales taxes, but sales applies to services so for most people it'll be close to a wash. (It'll apply to all brackets, therefore slightly regressive, but that's to be expected.) Some businesses will pay more and others will pay less. (Small businesses will be the ones that pay more, but again that's expected.) It does sound like counties with higher sales taxes and transit systems will make out pretty well. (but at a loss of control over their rates)

I don't like it, but compared to what I expected when I saw headlines, not to bad. (Obviously I have low expectations from Kasich.) I'll reserve further judgement till I've seen more information.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 01:06:27 PM by Keith »
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Offline Quimbob

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1346 on: February 06, 2013, 01:18:03 PM »
I was thinking that taxing professional services would actually be kinda progressive since wealthy people probably hire more pro services than poor people do but then really wealthy people jus have in house services, so.....
The county power grab is kinda weird - don't like it.
frankly I'm beginning to think Kasich is just trying to stir poop up for the sheer heck of it.
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Offline Boreas

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1347 on: February 08, 2013, 01:49:54 PM »
“I almost think it’s going the other direction. It’s like the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer,” said Brad Miller, treasurer of the Dawson-Bryant School District in southern Ohio’s Lawrence County.

“It looks like we haven’t accomplished anything. There was a lot of anticipation, and I had high hopes, but as of right now, it seems like nothing’s going to be done.”

Yesterday, Kasich said he still had not seen any material detailing how much money each of Ohio’s 612 school districts would receive under his plan.

“No, I don’t look at those because it’s the philosophy that matters,” Kasich said after a town-hall meeting with business professionals in Dayton to promote his tax proposals. “And to look at a (computer) run and yank out one part of it distorts the whole purpose of it. … We said we were going to fund the school system on the basis of dollars following pupils.”
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/02/08/this-is-not-what-we-were-told.html
=Dollars becoming revenue for school corporations
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Offline Clevelander17

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1348 on: February 10, 2013, 10:40:34 AM »
Kasich's new "education plan" is a sop for his cronies in the charter school business.  Parents who can already afford to send their children to private schools will get our tax money to send their children to private school.  It will be about a billion dollars of state revenues that will go to these corporations.

Seriously?  Of the Facebook friends I have in the education sector (only one of which works for a for-profit charter), all of them looked genuinely relieved when the budget proposal came out.  NPR has a decent rundown of the changes; the budget obviously supports vouchers more than you're comfortable with because you wouldn't be comfortable with anything short of completely eliminating them, and tries to give districts more labor flexibility, which I'm sure you also oppose.  That said, I really don't see any dramatic changes to the status quo here:

http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/2013/02/04/whats-gov-kasichs-2013-budget-does-for-education/

While I'm not a huge fan of vouchers at least the organizations that get the money tend to be trustworthy.  The problem is any expansion of charter school funding, particularly those run by for-profit companies.  That's where Kasich's ties to folks like Brennan are an issue certainly worth discussing.

At the end of the day, however, the problem with both charter schools and vouchers is that they'll only improve educational outcomes marginally while leaving behind the most troubled students in public schools with even less funding.  The math is a bit complicated, but a big part of what it comes down to is that funding for special education services is rarely enough to cover the costs of the mandates imposed by state and local governments, and these are the kids that are generally denied access to parochial and charter schools.  There are other issues, such as who actually has the time and resources to access schools of choice, too.

Offline westerninterloper

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1349 on: February 10, 2013, 12:08:40 PM »
Kasich's new "education plan" is a sop for his cronies in the charter school business.  Parents who can already afford to send their children to private schools will get our tax money to send their children to private school.  It will be about a billion dollars of state revenues that will go to these corporations.

Seriously?  Of the Facebook friends I have in the education sector (only one of which works for a for-profit charter), all of them looked genuinely relieved when the budget proposal came out.  NPR has a decent rundown of the changes; the budget obviously supports vouchers more than you're comfortable with because you wouldn't be comfortable with anything short of completely eliminating them, and tries to give districts more labor flexibility, which I'm sure you also oppose.  That said, I really don't see any dramatic changes to the status quo here:

http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/2013/02/04/whats-gov-kasichs-2013-budget-does-for-education/

While I'm not a huge fan of vouchers at least the organizations that get the money tend to be trustworthy.  The problem is any expansion of charter school funding, particularly those run by for-profit companies.  That's where Kasich's ties to folks like Brennan are an issue certainly worth discussing.

At the end of the day, however, the problem with both charter schools and vouchers is that they'll only improve educational outcomes marginally while leaving behind the most troubled students in public schools with even less funding.  The math is a bit complicated, but a big part of what it comes down to is that funding for special education services is rarely enough to cover the costs of the mandates imposed by state and local governments, and these are the kids that are generally denied access to parochial and charter schools.  There are other issues, such as who actually has the time and resources to access schools of choice, too.

The problem I have with charter schools - whether they are "good" or not, is that they are not truly public. They don't have to admit every student, and unlike public schools, they can kick students out pretty easily. So, comparing traditional public schools who admit everyone - including students with disabilities - is difficult. Those studies that have tried an "apples to apples" comparison have generally shown that charter schools, at best, do as well as traditional public schools. The other challenge for urban families is the transaction cost of searching for schools. Rather than having quality public schools for everyone, we have developed a system, like the free-market capitalism that spawned it -  that fetishizes choice over (e)quality, promotes the idea that education is an "industry", and believes that money is the root of all good.

More broadly, the education "problem" we have in the US at the moment is not one of cognitive ability, good teaching, funding, or anything else related to education. Rather, it's a tradition of racial and economic exclusion in the US that is determining most of the education "gap". Until we get to the root problems inherent (and often praised) failures of late American capitalism - such as chronic underemployment, low wages, a 24/hour economic cycle, and a lack of job security - we will be dealing with the same problems for generations.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 12:11:30 PM by westerninterloper »

Offline Civvik

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1350 on: February 10, 2013, 04:02:00 PM »
More broadly, the education "problem" we have in the US at the moment is not one of cognitive ability, good teaching, funding, or anything else related to education. Rather, it's a tradition of racial and economic exclusion in the US that is determining most of the education "gap". Until we get to the root problems inherent (and often praised) failures of late American capitalism - such as chronic underemployment, low wages, a 24/hour economic cycle, and a lack of job security - we will be dealing with the same problems for generations.

The older I get and the more I learn, the more I believe that America's problem is that its policies are just irrational by any political standard.

I could give you 100 examples from my old life of urban planning, but here's one from my new life in medicine: It's common practice to offer a woman a tube tie while she's getting a C-section. Rationale: she's just had a kid, she might not want any more, and you're already in there so you're saving time and money. A lot of women do it. But, it's illegal to offer it to a low-income mother. The state is afraid that doctors would "abuse their position of power and sterilize the poor." It's one of the small ways that America now has more births poor single mothers than rich partnered ones. That's a promising future.

It's a policy that, like many in America, is a train wreck of "personal freedom" meets "political corretness" meets a massive bureaucracy. And it makes nobody happy.
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Offline FakeCinEnquirer

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1351 on: February 10, 2013, 04:57:55 PM »
More broadly, the education "problem" we have in the US at the moment is not one of cognitive ability, good teaching, funding, or anything else related to education. Rather, it's a tradition of racial and economic exclusion in the US that is determining most of the education "gap". Until we get to the root problems inherent (and often praised) failures of late American capitalism - such as chronic underemployment, low wages, a 24/hour economic cycle, and a lack of job security - we will be dealing with the same problems for generations.



It's a policy that, like many in America, is a train wreck of "personal freedom" meets "political corretness" meets a massive bureaucracy. And it makes nobody happy.

And yet we are the ones trying to spread our brand of democracy around the world...

Offline Gramarye

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1352 on: February 11, 2013, 09:00:52 AM »
While I'm not a huge fan of vouchers at least the organizations that get the money tend to be trustworthy.  The problem is any expansion of charter school funding, particularly those run by for-profit companies.  That's where Kasich's ties to folks like Brennan are an issue certainly worth discussing.

At the end of the day, however, the problem with both charter schools and vouchers is that they'll only improve educational outcomes marginally while leaving behind the most troubled students in public schools with even less funding.  The math is a bit complicated, but a big part of what it comes down to is that funding for special education services is rarely enough to cover the costs of the mandates imposed by state and local governments, and these are the kids that are generally denied access to parochial and charter schools.  There are other issues, such as who actually has the time and resources to access schools of choice, too.

There are costs to taking the potential high achievers out of traditional failing urban public schools, true.  But there are costs to leaving those potential high achievers in those unconscionably hostile learning environments, too--namely, that that potential will never actually be realized, because critical learning years of youth will be lost.  They will be held back by the need to teach to the median (or below it) when that median is unacceptably low; many of these schools do not have the resources for gifted programs (as you note, what resources they do have are often required to go to special education first, and they can't even cover those needs).  In addition, in some of those schools, the academic culture is so hostile that enrolling in a gifted program might as well paint a target on one's back.  Akron Buchtel high school, at least as of a couple of years ago, offered all of one AP exam.  AP tests are huge for talented but poor children because they can shorten the amount of quarters or semesters that one actually needs to be in college, significantly reducing both the expenses of higher education and the time before one can start earning a paycheck with a college degree.

If leaving the potential high achievers in the traditional public school environment meant only a small loss of performance for the gifted but serious gains in performance for median-level students, then I'd be more supportive.  The hard evidence for that is extremely thin, however; as best I can tell, the exhortations to leave these students where they are because others will benefit from their presence seems to be mostly wishful thinking.  More accurately, the gifted are neglected and unchallenged while the school's resources and attention are focused on the problem populations; the school's administration in many cases simply has no choice.  That means that the status quo is unacceptable and promises of internal reform are meaningless because they come from administrations that could not deliver such internal reforms even if they wanted.  Refusing to allow high performers a way out of that system does a tremendous disservice to both the students and to the community.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1353 on: February 11, 2013, 12:14:33 PM »
I could give you 100 examples from my old life of urban planning, but here's one from my new life in medicine: It's common practice to offer a woman a tube tie while she's getting a C-section. Rationale: she's just had a kid, she might not want any more, and you're already in there so you're saving time and money. A lot of women do it. But, it's illegal to offer it to a low-income mother. The state is afraid that doctors would "abuse their position of power and sterilize the poor." It's one of the small ways that America now has more births poor single mothers than rich partnered ones. That's a promising future.

The offer makes a ton of sense also because if I'm not mistaken, any future kids will also be a C section.   Illegal to even offer is just plain stupid, ad reeks of trying to create a dependent class.
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Offline E Rocc

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1354 on: February 11, 2013, 12:15:56 PM »
[quote author=westerninterloper link=topic=24703.msg662337#msg662337 Until we get to the root problems inherent (and often praised) failures of late American capitalism - such as chronic underemployment, low wages, a 24/hour economic cycle, [/quote]

How exactly is the 24 hour cycle supposed to be a problem?
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Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1355 on: February 11, 2013, 12:53:58 PM »
^It's a very serious problem because people can't participate as normal functioning members of society when they work all these nights and weekends.

Offline GCrites80s

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1356 on: February 11, 2013, 01:02:02 PM »
While I'm not a huge fan of vouchers at least the organizations that get the money tend to be trustworthy.  The problem is any expansion of charter school funding, particularly those run by for-profit companies.  That's where Kasich's ties to folks like Brennan are an issue certainly worth discussing.

At the end of the day, however, the problem with both charter schools and vouchers is that they'll only improve educational outcomes marginally while leaving behind the most troubled students in public schools with even less funding.  The math is a bit complicated, but a big part of what it comes down to is that funding for special education services is rarely enough to cover the costs of the mandates imposed by state and local governments, and these are the kids that are generally denied access to parochial and charter schools.  There are other issues, such as who actually has the time and resources to access schools of choice, too.

There are costs to taking the potential high achievers out of traditional failing urban public schools, true.  But there are costs to leaving those potential high achievers in those unconscionably hostile learning environments, too--namely, that that potential will never actually be realized, because critical learning years of youth will be lost.  They will be held back by the need to teach to the median (or below it) when that median is unacceptably low; many of these schools do not have the resources for gifted programs (as you note, what resources they do have are often required to go to special education first, and they can't even cover those needs).  In addition, in some of those schools, the academic culture is so hostile that enrolling in a gifted program might as well paint a target on one's back.  Akron Buchtel high school, at least as of a couple of years ago, offered all of one AP exam.  AP tests are huge for talented but poor children because they can shorten the amount of quarters or semesters that one actually needs to be in college, significantly reducing both the expenses of higher education and the time before one can start earning a paycheck with a college degree.

If leaving the potential high achievers in the traditional public school environment meant only a small loss of performance for the gifted but serious gains in performance for median-level students, then I'd be more supportive.  The hard evidence for that is extremely thin, however; as best I can tell, the exhortations to leave these students where they are because others will benefit from their presence seems to be mostly wishful thinking.  More accurately, the gifted are neglected and unchallenged while the school's resources and attention are focused on the problem populations; the school's administration in many cases simply has no choice.  That means that the status quo is unacceptable and promises of internal reform are meaningless because they come from administrations that could not deliver such internal reforms even if they wanted.  Refusing to allow high performers a way out of that system does a tremendous disservice to both the students and to the community.

Even in "good schools" there's usually quite a few poor kids. They still tend to command a lot of attention because they're generally much more outgoing than the middle- and upper-income kids. That's something I noticed at every school I attended. Poor people know they need to be outgoing in order to survive -- think about why people initiate conversations. It's usually because they want or need something.

Offline Clevelander17

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1357 on: February 11, 2013, 10:05:51 PM »
While I'm not a huge fan of vouchers at least the organizations that get the money tend to be trustworthy.  The problem is any expansion of charter school funding, particularly those run by for-profit companies.  That's where Kasich's ties to folks like Brennan are an issue certainly worth discussing.

At the end of the day, however, the problem with both charter schools and vouchers is that they'll only improve educational outcomes marginally while leaving behind the most troubled students in public schools with even less funding.  The math is a bit complicated, but a big part of what it comes down to is that funding for special education services is rarely enough to cover the costs of the mandates imposed by state and local governments, and these are the kids that are generally denied access to parochial and charter schools.  There are other issues, such as who actually has the time and resources to access schools of choice, too.

There are costs to taking the potential high achievers out of traditional failing urban public schools, true.  But there are costs to leaving those potential high achievers in those unconscionably hostile learning environments, too--namely, that that potential will never actually be realized, because critical learning years of youth will be lost.  They will be held back by the need to teach to the median (or below it) when that median is unacceptably low; many of these schools do not have the resources for gifted programs (as you note, what resources they do have are often required to go to special education first, and they can't even cover those needs).  In addition, in some of those schools, the academic culture is so hostile that enrolling in a gifted program might as well paint a target on one's back.  Akron Buchtel high school, at least as of a couple of years ago, offered all of one AP exam.  AP tests are huge for talented but poor children because they can shorten the amount of quarters or semesters that one actually needs to be in college, significantly reducing both the expenses of higher education and the time before one can start earning a paycheck with a college degree.

If leaving the potential high achievers in the traditional public school environment meant only a small loss of performance for the gifted but serious gains in performance for median-level students, then I'd be more supportive.  The hard evidence for that is extremely thin, however; as best I can tell, the exhortations to leave these students where they are because others will benefit from their presence seems to be mostly wishful thinking.  More accurately, the gifted are neglected and unchallenged while the school's resources and attention are focused on the problem populations; the school's administration in many cases simply has no choice.  That means that the status quo is unacceptable and promises of internal reform are meaningless because they come from administrations that could not deliver such internal reforms even if they wanted.  Refusing to allow high performers a way out of that system does a tremendous disservice to both the students and to the community.

Just about everything you said is absolutely true.  The high achievers in this country are definitely marginalized, but this is a policy situation that starts at the Federal level and goes beyond any decisions being made at the local level.  Local administrators, particularly in urban districts, have their hands tied because their performance is rarely judged on how well their high achievers do, but instead on how much their low achievers make annual improvements.  That's where the focus of the money goes, and as such educational mediocrity is emphasized in this country by political leaders in far away offices.  Local educators are simply adapting to what they've been incentivized to do.

The solution for the high achievers is not necessarily more school choice (or more choice beyond public schools).  Charter schools and even most parochial schools aren't usually outperforming public schools with similar demographics, so I'm not sure why expanding access to these types of schools is necessary.  Why is the government's solution to the mess it has created to create another convoluted mess?  Why not loosen special education mandates and encourage tiered levels of public schools (i.e. gifted, average, remedial, special education, etc.) within the public schools system?   There's no reason why the best and brightest should need to leave the public school system to find a superior education.  If the Federal government stopped forcing districts to focus so much of their resources on such a small portion of their enrollment, districts might be able to do some more innovative things to help their high achievers flourish.  Instead of one John Hay type of a school, CMSD should have at least half a dozen, all of which would be a privilege to attend.

Offline Boreas

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Ohio's former Gov. Ted Strickland unleashed criticism on JobsOhio today
« Reply #1358 on: August 05, 2013, 07:11:47 AM »
Ohio's former Gov. Ted Strickland unleashed criticism on JobsOhio today and suggested it could turn into a scandal that could cost current Gov. John Kasich his job next year.

"I think it is scandalous now, and the way it was put together is very, very puzzling," said Strickland.  "Taking public tax dollars, giving them to a private entity, depriving the state auditor, the Republican elected state auditor from having the ability to get in there and see what they're doing, who they're giving money to and what deals have been made.  This is a scandal waiting to happen."

This week the Columbus Dispatch reported that a Columbus business is closing its doors only to reopen them - with the state's help - in Wilmington. TimberTech says it will close its Columbus factory and eliminate up to 58 jobs. In the meantime, the company will get an eight-year, 50 percent tax credit from the state if it creates 85 new jobs in Wilmington.
...
"They've already done some things that I think are so horrendous," said Strickland.  "Marathon Oil a multi-million tax cut.  Bob Evans, multi-million dollars to go from South Columbus to New Albany.  There are so many examples of where this governor has taken care of his wealthy friends."

10TV: Central Ohio's News Leader!
http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/08/02/ohio-governor-strickland-talks-jobsOhio.html
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Offline Gramarye

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1359 on: August 05, 2013, 09:07:37 AM »
On the other hand, Kasich's job approval rating has rebounded greatly since the SB 5 days, and has been above the 50% mark for a while now:

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/02/28/quinnipiac-poll-kasich-popularity-peaks.html

http://triblive.com/politics/politicalheadlines/4346614-74/kasich-ohio-job#axzz2aKYbSwNf


Offline Clevelander17

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1360 on: August 05, 2013, 12:54:26 PM »
If Strickland's going to whine like that, he should be running.  He would have a better chance than FitzGerald.

Offline 327

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1361 on: August 05, 2013, 12:59:07 PM »
FWIW, Fitzgerald is also whining about what increasingly appears to be major corruption at JobsOhio.  People who sit on its board are funneling public funds directly to their own private interests.  I don't think it's possible to bring that up too often, because it seems a lot more serious than Coingate.

Offline E Rocc

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1362 on: August 05, 2013, 01:34:43 PM »
Ohio's former Gov. Ted Strickland unleashed criticism on JobsOhio today and suggested it could turn into a scandal that could cost current Gov. John Kasich his job next year.

"I think it is scandalous now, and the way it was put together is very, very puzzling," said Strickland.  "Taking public tax dollars, giving them to a private entity, depriving the state auditor, the Republican elected state auditor from having the ability to get in there and see what they're doing, who they're giving money to and what deals have been made.  This is a scandal waiting to happen."

This week the Columbus Dispatch reported that a Columbus business is closing its doors only to reopen them - with the state's help - in Wilmington. TimberTech says it will close its Columbus factory and eliminate up to 58 jobs. In the meantime, the company will get an eight-year, 50 percent tax credit from the state if it creates 85 new jobs in Wilmington.
...
"They've already done some things that I think are so horrendous," said Strickland.  "Marathon Oil a multi-million tax cut.  Bob Evans, multi-million dollars to go from South Columbus to New Albany.  There are so many examples of where this governor has taken care of his wealthy friends."

10TV: Central Ohio's News Leader!
http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/08/02/ohio-governor-strickland-talks-jobsOhio.html

If the plant was going to move anyway. does it make sense to help the company relocate within Ohio, rather than simply lure in new companies and let the old ones go to other states?
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Offline Hts121

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1363 on: August 05, 2013, 02:01:39 PM »
^Now think about what your response to this program would be if it was spawned by and operated under Strickland or Fitzgerald.  I'm a mild fan of Kasich, but JobsOhio is without a doubt a train wreck (no pun intended) for his administration and political brand.
It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg - Thomas Jefferson

Offline 327

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Re: Governor John Kasich
« Reply #1364 on: August 05, 2013, 02:03:45 PM »
The same program minus the self-dealing and minus the cover-up might have some value.  As it currently stands, it's an abomination.

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