Photos > General Photos

Urban Ohio "Picture Of The Day"

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J.Remy:
That's a lot of Technical info.  What exactly is ISO.  I was taking photos a couple of months ago and I pushed a button accidently and the ISO kept changing.  I didn't notice any difference in my pictures. 

Anyway, here is my photo.  I was quite pleased when Reviewer said he found this to be stunning.  Made my day  :-D



So, some info about the picture/camera

Canon PowerShot SD450 Digital ELPH
Canon Zoom Lens 3x
5.8-17.44mm
1:2.8-4.9
5.0 Mega Pixels

Basically just reading the front of my camera

Any feedbackon how to figure stuff out about my camera and what things mean would be great. 

Thanks

Florida Guy:
Love that photo Musky!

Wow... Nice shot!

C-Dawg:
What exactly is ISO.  I was taking photos a couple of months ago and I pushed a button accidently and the ISO kept changing.  I didn't notice any difference in my pictures.

ISO hails back to the era of film. It refers to an emulsion's sensitivity to light. The higher the ISO, the less light that is needed. An ISO 200 film needs twice the light of an ISO 400 film. And ISO 100 film needs four times the light of an ISO 400 film, etc., etc. ISO also is related to a film's level of grain. An ISO 100 film like Fuji Reala has small, hardly noticeable grain while an ISO 400 film like Kodak Max has much larger, more offensive grain. So why does anyone even bother shooting high ISO? Basically, high ISO's allow more handheld work under poor lighting conditions (you can can use faster shutter speeds). Low ISO films look cleaner, but they're only hand-holdable in good lighting since they require slower shutter speeds. An ISO 400 film will require a shutter speed of 1/125 where an ISO 100 film will require 1/30 under the same lighting conditions. High ISO = fast film. Low ISO = slow film.

In digital, high ISO (ISO 400, 800, etc.) leads to more "electronic/digital noise," which is basically the same thing as grain (though I generally find it uglier than film grain), while low ISO (ISO 100) should have no grain at all, unless you're using a cheap camera.

If you enlarge your digital pictures, you should notice a difference between an ISO 100 shot and an ISO 400 shot.

richNcincy:
Camera Model: Canon EOS Digital Rebel
Color Representation:  sRGB
Shutter Speed:  30 sec.
Lens Aperture: F/40
Flash Mode:  No Flash
Focal Length:  400 mm
F-Number:  F/40
Exposure Time:  30 sec.
ISO Speed:  ISO-100
Metering Mode:  Pattern
Exposure Compensation:  0 step
Date Picture Taken:  11/25/2006 11:46PM

musky:
Absolutely the best picture of the day... at least until December 8

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